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Manage your research articles freely on ScienceOpen

In the current ecosystem of academic publishing, research outputs make a long journey from the desks of researchers to research platforms. Once a preprint has been turned into a published paper, authors have almost no influence on metadata tagging, or whether their articles got indexed in a whole world of databases and research platforms. If you have ever come across a ‘ghost profile’ of yourself on the Web, this is where it came from.

With MyScienceOpen, our vision was to create a holistic platform where researchers can flexibly interact with their research outputs, and control the content themselves. In addition to our range of visibility enhancement services and impact monitoring tools, it remains crucial to enable authors to freely manage their articles on our platform and add new content easily and in a 100% legal way.

Flexible interaction with content from publishers

As a result, we are excited to announce our new article integration feature. This is the first time that a major research networking platform facilitates interaction with content from publishers, as opposed to manually uploaded[1] records from individual authors.

In a time where we are all over-worked, it is crucial not to add to researcher fatigue. This is why we leverage ORCID for seamless and efficient integration of your research outputs into ScienceOpen.

Here, we will briefly guide you through our new content management features and share some tips and tricks to make the most out of them. Ready?

How to add your content to ScienceOpen and manage your publications

At the moment, you can add content to your ScienceOpen profile from two sources: from ORCID or form our existing corpus of 32 million article records. In addition, collection editors are also welcome to submit DOI lists, and BibTex or RefWorks files to us, and let us work our magic behind the scenes to integrate these into our database or your profile.

  • Via ORCID

ORCID integration on ScienceOpen has never been easier. Your ScienceOpen profile and list of publications can be updated directly using your ORCID profile, providing effortless integration of the two.

This means that there’s no journal policy checking, no manual uploading, and no takedown notices, as the whole thing is based directly on your publication record itself.

ORCID integration on ScienceOpen
Seamless ORCID integration on ScienceOpen 1.

The new ORCID integration button on your profile page takes you to your Dashboard where you can import articles from your ORCID account with one click. After clicking on Refresh from ORCID, your ORCID records will be automatically imported to ScienceOpen. If needed, you can update ORCID permissions or edit your ORCID profile.

Get more content on ScienceOpen
Seamless ORCID integration on ScienceOpen 2.
  • Claim authorship feature

Another option for adding content to your ScienceOpen profile is claiming authorship of articles from our research corpus. It’s simple: select the Get more content menu on your dashboard (or just click on the Get more content button on your profile). Here the Claim your articles option shows how many potentially matching articles are found for you to claim.  In case of finding this result list too long, the multi-layered searching and filtering tools available on all our search pages will help you to filter the needles from the haystack.

In addition to the Claim authorship button, a Mark as not mine button is also available on each article record waiting for your confirmation of authorship.  A click to this will ensure that the record in question will never appear again on your list. By doing so, you can help us to improve our database.

Add content to your ScienceOpen profile
Steps of adding content to your ScienceOpen profile

By claiming your articles, each record will become displayed among your publications. On the top of this, the claimed record will also be linked back into your ORCID profile via real-time synchronization.

ScienceOpen source on ORCID
Source: ScienceOpen

As a result, a reciprocal ORCID-ScienceOpen integration comes full circle.

To make the most of this feature, we share some tips & tricks in our brand new FAQ page.

Seamless and reciprocal ORCID-ScienceOpen integration
Seamless and reciprocal ORCID-ScienceOpen integration

 

3 main benefits of reciprocal ScienceOpen-ORCID integration

Joining to ORCID’s Collect & Connect initiative, our aim was to contribute to a more verified and transparent ecosystem of academic communication. By leveraging the power of reciprocal ScienceOpen-ORCID integration, we make sure that your research on ScienceOpen:

  • Is assigned to the right person

As a persistent identifier, your ORCID ID distinguishes you from other authors with similar names.  Linking back your article records available on our platform to your ORCID account helps us recognize the researcher behind the article record and hence disambiguate any conflicts in authorship and metadata.

  • Retains complete control by its author(s) in terms of visibility and metadata

Having your articles integrated to your ORCID profile allows you to edit your research metadata (e.g., to add additional information such as DOIs to your article records or to modify the list of order of authors on the article record). Furthermore, you can also list manuscripts and preprints to your ORCID account to make your research visible from its inception. This visibility however can be shaped and controlled by the privacy settings on the information in your record.

  • Is easily connectable and has cross-platform compatibility

Being listed in your ORCID profile, article records can be linked to multiple platforms though ORCID bringing about better connectivity to your research. Having therefore just one highly-integrated and detailed profile like ORCID, you can save time from manually maintaining all the different platforms.

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

When your content is complete on ScienceOpen, we will display your research in context:

  • Dynamic views of readership and Altmetrics through time
  • Total citations of your work, and links to all articles
  • Articles you have referenced available on ScienceOpen
  • Similar authors and research articles you might not be aware of
  • Have any collection Editors singled out your work?

It’s your turn now to play around with our new article management and integration features and tell us how you like them. As a next step in boosting your research impact, make use of our brand new enhance visibility tools and add non-specialist summaries, images, keywords or discipline tags to your article records. Enjoy! 🙂

[1] Here you can learn more about why we don’t support direct manual upload.

In:  About SO  

Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

Last week, we unveiled MyScienceOpen, our new professional networking platform for researchers. MySciencOpen comes with a whole cadre of new features that combine the functionality of a range of existing social platforms, and bring them directly to you all in one place. You get access to all of this at the click of a button through our ORCID integration. Free, legal, and easy!

One of the main new features we’ve added is the ability for authors to upload non-specialist summaries to their articles. This is great for increasing the visibility and impact of your research at the point of discovery.

But how can you track this increased impact? Aha, well, we thought of that. Every user at ScienceOpen now has a whole suite of brand new metrics that track how their content is being re-used across ScienceOpen.

Quantifying your context

Everyone can see the tab for your content in context. These show how many total ‘nodes’ or connections your work forms in the context of the ScienceOpen platform. We show:

  • Your total number of publications
  • Your total number of different journals published in
  • How many co-authors you’ve published with
  • How many articles you’ve referenced
  • How many articles in our database have cited you
Exhibit 1

Continue reading “Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen

Last week, we were pleased to announce the launch of our new professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen.

Fully integrated into our article archive of 32 million article records, and combined with our extensive researcher toolkit, MyScienceOpen is the only research networking platform you will ever need!

Now, this is not just another researcher profile. This is the researcher profile. Why have one profile for your research usage, another for you article records, another for your science communication activities, another to record your peer reviews, another for searching for research, and another for tracking citations and Altmetrics? It’s exhausting!

MyScienceOpen brings you all of these features into one platform. We make this even easier by leveraging the power of ORCID to make integration, tracking, and activation of your research one seamless process. All it takes is the click of a button!

Continue reading “Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen”  

Warm welcome to the May winners of our free indexing competition

The May round of our free Open Access indexing competition comes with a focus on the broader context of scholarly communication: education. The new APC-free, Open Access journals that we selected will be fully integrated into, and promoted on, our platform. They hail from different corners of the world, as part of our mission to break down geographical barriers to research.

They facilitate critical and open discussion on all levels of the educational system and bring issues like transparency in education, inequalities in learning opportunities, educational management, students’ experiences in higher education, and bringing  evidence-based best practices to the table.

Anyone can freely read, download, and share any of the articles, as well as export the article citation metadata to their favourite reference manager. ScienceOpen users can:

  1. Add them to a new or existing collection
  2. Recommend them to their colleagues
  3. Publicly peer review and comment on any they wish
  4. Invite their colleagues to peer review them

These new journals are:

Publisher: Institute of Business Management

Society/Institution: Institute of Business Management, Karachi

Country of publisher: Pakistan

The Journal of Education and Educational Development focuses on both theoretical and applied research studies in education and related disciplines. Through publishing research articles, case studies, book reviews, and critical reviews, the journal intends to present its audience with interdisciplinary themes on education and educational development.

Continue reading “Warm welcome to the May winners of our free indexing competition”  

In:  Collections  

Burgeoning green technologies on ScienceOpen

How are we supposed to have an informed debate about climate change when so much important information remains locked away from the public?

At ScienceOpen, we have more than 7000 Open Access research papers on climate change, and that’s just the beginning.

(source)

Research on emerging green technologies such as renewable energies, low-impact development strategies, advanced materials, smart water, and waste water management and remanufacturing is indispensable in tackling some of the world’s most pressing issues through continuous technological advancement.

Improving scientific literacy in these evolving fields is crucial, and at ScienceOpen we are helping to provide basic access to the latest important research.

Our recent additions of 2 publisher-led and 2 researcher-led collections bring together a selection of the latest innovations in the fields of energy engineering and management and ecology. They help us rethinking the relationship between our built and natural environment in the context of grand global challenges and offer life greening solutions for a sustainable social civilization.

Continue reading “Burgeoning green technologies on ScienceOpen”  

In:  Announcements  

MyScienceOpen: The only networking platform you’ll ever need

Today, we are happy to announce our launch of MyScienceOpen, the professional networking platform designed for a modern research environment.

Since 2013, ScienceOpen has been leading innovation in advanced search and discovery, open peer review, and content management. Now, by leveraging the power of ORCID, we bring you our latest service for helping researchers to make an impact in the open.

MyScienceOpen is an integrated profile where academics can visualize their research impact through enhanced author-level metrics. Key new features include:

  • Interactive visualizations of an author’s readers, citations, and Altmetric scores for all their publications through time;
  • Addition of non-specialist article summaries, disciplines, keywords, and images to their article records;
  • Extraction of articles as RIS, BibTex and Endnote citation metadata for your reference managers;
  • Enhanced statistics for collection Editors to track usage.
New features to enhance your article visibility!

Making an impact in a research discovery ecosystem

We designed these new features for you to make an increased impact, and keep track as your research progresses. All of this is provided to you within the context of a discovery environment of more than 31 million article records. It just makes sense to have these profile and article enhancement features integrated into an ecosystem where people are actually discovering and re-using research. And for free, of course.

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In:  Peer Review  
Increasing academic support for Open Peer Review

Increasing academic support for Open Peer Review

‘Open research’ isn’t just about sharing resources like data, code, and papers, although this is a big part of it. One big, and often under-appreciated aspect of it is about making research accessible, inclusive, and participatory. A major principle driving this is leveraging transparency to bring processes and factors that are currently hidden into public view.

One area of research and scholarly communication where the debate is still very much ongoing for this is for peer review – our system of validation and gatekeeping to the vast archives of public knowledge.

OpenAIRE have released an important new survey and analysis on attitudes and experiences towards ‘Open Peer Review’ (OPR), based on more than 3000 respondents (full data available here to play with). This is important, as OPR is all about the principles above – making the process transparent, collaborative, inclusive, and in the end, better!

Below, we discuss some of the major findings of the survey, and how we at ScienceOpen fit into the bigger picture of Open Peer Review.

The future is Open

The main result of the survey is that the majority (60.3%) of respondents are in favour of OPR becoming a mainstream scholarly practice, particularly regarding open interaction, open reports and final-version commenting. Part of this is due to the relatively lower satisfaction scores reported, with just 56.4% of respondents being satisfied with traditional closed peer review, and 20.6% being dissatisfied – a much lower gap than all previous reports. From the survey, more than three quarters of respondents had previously engaged with OPR either as an author, reviewer, or editor. This suggests that OPR, in one form or another, is already probably more common practice than we might think.

Interestingly, this development is similar to what we saw with other aspects of ‘open science’ such as open access and open data – there is debate, experimentation, variable implementation, and finally they start to become accepted as the norm as policies, practices, and cultures adapt. The survey also showed that 88.2% of respondents were in favour of Open Access to publications, a much higher value than several years ago. It also found that support for OPR is correlated with support for Open Data and Open Access, which is perhaps not surprising, although conversations regarding OPR are still in their relative infancy.

This suggests that as debates around OPR mature, we are likely to see an increase in the uptake and support of it, as with other areas of ‘Open’. Indeed, the survey also found a difference in generational support for OPR, with younger generations favouring it more over more-established researchers. As it is these generations who will inherit and govern the system in the future, it is more likely to have the characteristics that they favour.

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In:  Peer Review  

Defining Open Peer Review at ScienceOpen

Recently, our colleagues at OpenAIRE have published a systematic review of ‘Open Peer Review’ (OPR). As part of this, they defined seven consistent traits of OPR, which we thought sounded like a remarkably good opportunity to help clarify how peer review works at ScienceOpen.

At ScienceOpen, we have over 31 million article records all available for public, post-publication peer review (PPPR), more than 3 million of which are full-text Open Access. This functionality is a response to increasing calls for continuous moderation of the published research literature, a consistent questioning of the functionality of the traditional peer review model (some examples in this post), and an increasing recognition that scientific discourse does not stop at the ‘event’ point of publication for any research article.

Peer Review at ScienceOpen – A brief summary

Open participation

At ScienceOpen, we invite the whole scientific community to contribute to the review process, should they wish to. The only requirement is that the person has to be registered at ORCID and have at least five publications assigned to their ORCID account to write a review (Scientific Members and Experts). If you do not satisfy these requirements and wish to perform a peer review at ScienceOpen, please contact us and we will make an exception for you.

Users with at least one publication assigned to their ORCID account are able to comment on a paper (Members). Please refer to our User categories for further details.

We also encourage users to use our ‘Invite to review’ function (see below), which is available on more than 31 million article records. We know that editorial control will always be a critical aspect of any open peer review system, including PPPR, and therefore encourage collection Editors to solicit peer reviews for articles within their collections.

Continue reading “Defining Open Peer Review at ScienceOpen”  

Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

This year in our Open Science Stars series, we’ve heard from researchers in Europe and Asia and their experiences of the publishing world, as well as from funders like the Gates Foundation. Today, we’ve interviewed Jonathan Peelle, a cognitive psychologist working in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University in Saint Louis. Jonathan recently built a collection on Neuroimaging Methods (ways to look inside your brain..), at ScienceOpen, so we decided it would be nice to turn the tables and pick his brain instead to learn about his research background and interests in open science!

  1. Hi Jonathan! Thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about your research interests?

My research is focused on the neuroscience of language processing, and how sensory and cognitive systems interact to enable communication. We are interested in questions like:

  • How can we understand people we’ve never heard before?
  • Why is having a conversation in noise harder for some people than for others?
  • How similar is brain activity across a group of people?

My lab spends a lot of time studying people with hearing loss and cochlear implants because of the profound effects these have on sensory processing. We rely on converging evidence from behavioral studies, structural MRI, and functional neuroimaging.

MRI scan of human head in a patient with benign familial macrocephaly (Source)

Continue reading “Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle”  

In:  About SO  

Getting started at ScienceOpen

We recognise that some times it’s not clear exactly what you’re supposed to do when joining a new research platform. What are the important features, what’s everybody else doing, how do I make my profile as strong as possible? Well, hopefully this will make it easier for you. If you’re still wondering ‘What’s that ScienceOpen thing all about?’, hopefully this will add a bit of clarity too!

Here are the main things you need to know about ScienceOpen:

  • Get an ORCID account

More than 3 million researchers already have an ORCID account, which acts as both a unique identifier and an integrated profile for them. Registration for it takes 30 seconds, and is now a core part of scholarly infrastructure, with many journals requiring an ORCID profile prior to article submission. Make sure it’s well-populated with all of your published papers, (drawn automatically from Web of Science, Scopus, or CrossRef). Easy!

  • Refresh your profile from ORCID

*click* Done.

From your profile page (eg here)

Continue reading “Getting started at ScienceOpen”  

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