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In:  Announcements  

ScienceOpen launches dynamic hosting services with UCL Press

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce a new hosting partnership with UCL Press, the first fully Open Access university press in the UK, based at University College London. With this, ScienceOpen extends its portfolio of dedicated features for publishers to enhance the visibility and context of their content by adding a suite of full-text hosting services.

All 8 scholarly journals published by UCL Press will be hosted on the ScienceOpen discovery platform and integrated into ScienceOpen’s research network. This will provide a dynamic, transparent and interactive Open Access channel that pushes the boundaries of how we create and communicate knowledge.

“ScienceOpen’s new hosting service is the logical extension of our commitment to putting research in context. With our advanced technology we can ensure that UCL Press articles are found by the right researchers and then give those readers the opportunity to interact with the content in a variety of ways. A range of aggregated journal- and article-level metrics then provide enriched usage statistics for the publisher to monitor impact,” said CEO of ScienceOpen, Dr. Stephanie Dawson.

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In:  Other  

Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen

Unique

Peer review at ScienceOpen is a little different to what you might be used to.

Does the fact that a paper has been published, and therefore peer reviewed, mean that it is flawless? Does it mean that the conversation around that research should stop? We do not think so. The only reason there would ever be no value in doing post-publication evaluation would be if all published work were completely infallible. Which is clearly not the case. This is, after all, why we continue to do research and build upon the work of those before us!

Therefore, we enable post-publication peer review across 34 million article records, as a form of final-version commenting. It can also be performed on preprints from the arXiv. These are essentially treated as open, pre-review manuscripts. Users can organise these into collections, and manage peer review entirely themselves as a community process.

Managed

We have now added a new feature that enables any of our users to invite another researcher to perform peer review on our platform. This is in the same way that an Editor does for a journal, as part of a fully transparent process – the theme for Peer Review Week this year! The difference to the traditional process of peer review is that this is more democratic as it is open to anyone.

Step 1 – Find a paper of interest.

All article pages now have an ‘Invite to Review’ button. Click it, and you have 2 options.

  1. Search within the ScienceOpen userbase to see if the person you want to review already has a profile with us.
  2. Add an email, or list of emails, of who you want to invite to review, if they don’t already have a ScienceOpen profile.
Step 2 – Invite your colleagues to review!

That’s it. It’s that easy. This combines the editorial management of peer review with open participation. We enable this to make sure that the process is fair, but efficient. This means that anyone within your research community can contribute to the research process, should they wish to.

Continue reading “Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Other  

ScienceOpen interview series: Prof. George Perry, world expert on Alzheimer’s Disease

Professor George Perry is the Dean of the College of Sciences at the University of Texas in San Antonio. He is recognised as a world expert in the field of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, we spoke with Prof. Perry about his research, including his new ScienceOpen collection.

(Source)

Hi Prof. Perry! You are recognised as one of the 100 top scientists in Neuroscience and Behaviour, and have incredibly amassed more than 1300 research publications to date! What’s the secret to your success?  

Persistence and focus on collecting and publishing highly useful data and insights.

Do you ever find it difficult maintaining your public profile with so many publications? How did you find the ORCID integration at ScienceOpen?

Maintaining numerous profiles as up-to-date requires constant monitoring. Linking datasets with ORCID does assist.

Your research focusses on the processes leading to neuronal damage. What have been your key discoveries to date?

Primarily, establishing oxidative stress in Alzheimer’s disease. Second, new insights regarding the cell biology of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your ScienceOpen collection is on alternative approaches to Alzheimer’s disease. What is the ‘alternative’ in this case, and why is this so important?

It is the alternative to the amyloid cascade, which dominates our field. The collection presents a biological view of Alzheimer’s disease.

What do you hope to achieve with your ScienceOpen collection? And how can we help you with this?

The collection provides a group of papers that illuminates an alternative to amyloid as the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.  I use it when communicating with others about weakness and alternatives, and to demonstrate that the amyloid cascade has been questioned for over two decades.

Thank you for your time, Prof. Perry. It has been great to learn from your insight and experience!

 

In:  Announcements  

New feature: Export citation lists at ScienceOpen

Rapid innovation and evolution drives good science

At ScienceOpen, we are constantly evolving to match the needs and demands of the global research community. Already this week, we announced a new feature for users to directly import articles from PubMed, DOAJ, or Crossref, semantically integrate them into our network, and boost your open citation counts.

Now, ScienceOpen provides all users with is the ability to export article citation lists based on search criteria. This is a unique service we provide, and saves researchers the laborious and tedious task of individually assembling reference databases. Like all other services for researchers at ScienceOpen, this is, of course, free!

The export citation button now appears on every article record in our database (source).

We now offer citation exports at two different levels:

1. Export individual articles

Found an article you like on ScienceOpen and want to export it to your reference manager? Easy! On each article page, across 33 million records, there is now an ‘Export citation’ button. You can download them in either BibTex, Endnote, or RIS format, making them compatible with almost any modern reference manager.

Export any ScienceOpen search result into Endnote, BibTe, or RIS format (Source)

Continue reading “New feature: Export citation lists at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Announcements  

Boost your open citations with our new article request feature

Missing an article or citation from ScienceOpen, or want to add more of your own publications? Users can now request articles to be integrated into our database via their dashboard. These can be your own articles, or someone else’s – the choice is yours!

All we need are either a list of:

  • CrossRef DOIs
  • DOAJ IDs
  • PubMed IDs

Simply upload a file or copy and paste them in, click the button and away you go! We’ll send you a notification by email to let you know the status of each article. We’ll work our magic behind the scenes and integrate your selection as soon as is computationally possible.

Find this feature on your user dashboard.

Boost your citations

One of the great things about this new feature is that you can add a list of DOIs of articles that cite your own work. We provide a free and open citation network for each of our users, based on extracting citation data from peer reviewed publications. Thanks to initiatives like I4OC, it is becoming easier to provide enriched citation information like we do for researchers for free.

To find your Dashboard, click on the My ScienceOpen tab at the top!

By adding research that cites your work, we provide an easy and great way to make sure that your citation profile is complete! This isn’t gaming the system, it’s simply making it comprehensive and open. That’s important. Put this in the context of our recently launched author-metrics, and you’re on to a winning academic profile!

For collection editors

If you have a collection at ScienceOpen, you can specify that these records be automatically integrated into them. You can add these in bulk, with 100 DOIs per request for now. Personalising your collections and making them complete has never been easier! If you want to set up your own collection and try out these features, contact us here!

Integration and validation

By using the new ‘claim authorship’ feature, your articles will be directly integrated with your ScienceOpen profile and ORCID. This provides crucial cross-validation of your research history, a unique feature of ScienceOpen. If you’re adding you own article records, these will be available in your ‘Claim your articles’ section of the Dashboard, where you can easily add them to your profile.

Collecting and Connecting with ORCID!

We recognise that no research database is complete, and ScienceOpen is no exception. We work closely with publishers, ORCID, and platforms like PubMed to integrate new content on a daily basis. But we can’t pick up everything, and that’s where you come in!

By adding personalised content, you help us to fill in the blank spots in our database. This helps to enrich our network by putting this content into our semantically linked network.  We are currently only indexing research articles and not book chapters, proceedings or other content types.

So pop over to your dashboard, try it out, and let us know what you think!

In:  Collections  

Showcasing our favourite ScienceOpen collections

In the last few months at ScienceOpen, we have rolled out an incredible number of new features for our users. Now, we feel it is time to take stock, and reflect on how you are all using them to help enhance your research. We want to recognise some of the valuable work from the global research community in helping to make science more open!

There are now 177 excellent research collections published on ScienceOpen, each with our pretty slick new collection statistics. With this, we want to highlight just a few of the latest collections that have really caught our eye. Here, the collection editors have each done exceptional work in curating and promoting research to create a valuable resource for their communities.

Take a dive into one of the latest collections all about the world of sponges!

Take your pick!

  • Good practices in cognitive neuroscience and science communication – Cyril Pernet and Jonathan Peelle
    • For researchers, scientific integrity and communication have never been more important. This collection contains some excellent articles on statistics and data visualisation and data and code sharing.
  • Small-angle X-ray scattering: Recent – Brian Pauw
    • Part of the new SAXS collection series, this automatically updates with the most recent publications in the field. A fantastic educational resource for Chemistry students.
  • Research paper of the future – Gail Clement and Plato Smith
    • Papers relating to new models and prototypes of the future research article. Great for those interested in scholarly communication!
  • Wikipedia Quality – Egon Willighagen
    • How much do you trust the information in Wikipedia? This collection has some research to illuminate this for you!
  • Paleontology of Mongolia – Andrew Farke
    • Mongolia is a treasure trove of fossils for palaeontologists. Learn about what they’ve discovered here!
  • Pneumonia, sex, and the environment – Patricia Silveyra (read her Editorial here!)
    • Articles describing the link between air pollution, pneumonia, and the differences between male and female individuals.
  • Tics – Kevin Black
    • The science behind tic disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome.
  • Higher order chromatin architecture – Wolf Gebhardt
    • Delving into our understanding of the function and structure of higher order chromatin.
Collection statistics looking great here!

 

Continue reading “Showcasing our favourite ScienceOpen collections”  

In:  About SO  

Making your science work for society

Recently, we announced new features enabling authors to add non-specialist summaries to their articles indexed on ScienceOpen. We believe that having authors add these to their articles helps to make them more accessible to a wider audience, increase their reach. It makes a clear statement that they care about the societal impact of their research.

Value added!

Well, clearly you are all seeing the value in these features too! We’ve already had over 170 great authors writing non-specialist summaries since making the announcement. By integrating this into our research engine, we are seeing those articles gaining a huge boost in popularity! These authors have also added extra keywords and thumbnails to their articles to make them more visible and discoverable on ScienceOpen.

Great author summary of important groundwater research in Indonesia (Source)

Making an impact in the open

We are extremely happy to see authors keen to make their work more accessible. The great thing about adding these summaries is that they are valuable whether or not the articles are published Open Access.

Some of our favourites so far are:

Continue reading “Making your science work for society”  

Taking Open Access Beyond Articles and Institutes

In the current ecosystem of scholarly communication, effective infrastructures for the responsible and open dissemination of intellectual output are an inevitability, especially for research institutions.

Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH is one of the biggest research institutes in Europe with about 5,900 employees and publishes its own open access journals.

At ScienceOpen, we are always looking for ways to help maximize the visibility of institutional research output. Today, we are happy to announce that the two Forschungszentrum Jülich open access journals, Journal of large-scale research facilities and Collective Dynamics, are now indexed on ScienceOpen. Here we have compiled a brief description of both journals.

Instruments with DOIs: Journal of large-scale research facilities

The Journal of large-scale research facilities allows large-scale equipment to be cited properly by assigning DOIs to the articles describing them. It covers large-scale equipment from all scientific disciplines and is also mostly intended for use by scientists not affiliated to the institution operating the facilities (dedicated user operation). Furthermore, it provides operators of large-scale research facilities with the opportunity to describe their equipment. In order to keep the focus on the facilities themselves, all articles are published in the name of the operating institution (corporate author). There are now descriptions of more than 120 large-scale facilities from the Helmholtz Association, the large scientific organization of which Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH is a member.

Among the facilities covered by the journal are:

  • MARIA, the magnetic reflectometer with high incident angle
  • RESEDA, the resonance spin echo spectrometer
  • MEPHISTO, a facility for particle physics with cold neutrons
  • TOFTOF, the cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer
  • GALAXI, the gallium anode low-angle x-ray instrument
  • BALU, the largest autoclave research facility in the world
Dr. Wolfgang Häußler shows RESEDA on a lab course at Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (source).

Make them citable

Assigning DOIs (digital object identifiers) to research facilities and integrating them into the common system of linking scholarly references makes them:

  • Easier to find, cite, link, and identify.
  • Easier to track their usage and trace research networks to the facility it is used by.
  • Easier to track their evaluations and assess their impact.

Additional benefits include:

  • Users of the facilities can cite the equipment unambiguously in their publications with the aid of the article.
  • An additional benefit for users is that they do not need to repeat the description of the instrument in each of their papers.

Research on the crossroads and beyond: Collective Dynamics

The peer-reviewed open access journal Collective Dynamics publishes the latest innovations in the fields of pedestrian dynamics, crowds, vehicular traffic, and other systems of self-driven particles, such as molecular motors, animal groups, or agents. Articles are written in a way that makes them accessible to a wide range of scientific disciplines.

They reveal:

Shibuya crossing

Being indexed on ScienceOpen will help these journals to reach out to readers and to gain maximum visibility and re-use of the articles.

To learn more about indexing on ScienceOpen, contact us here.

 

In:  Other  

ScienceOpen Collecting and Connecting with ORCID

ORCID have recognised the discovery and networking platform ScienceOpen for leadership in integrating their services as part of their Collect and Connect program.

Under ORCID’s mantra of “Enter once, reuse often”, Collect and Connect is designed for member organizations to collect, display, connect and synchronize data between research information systems. This was developed to streamline the integration process across a range of research systems, funders, and publishers.

ORCID has been at the foundation of ScienceOpen since inception, enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are delighted to be among the first recognized by ORCID as part of their Collect and Connect Program. ORCID has been essential to our development, and together we will continue to build a robust scholarly infrastructure for all stakeholders.”

ScienceOpen features alongside other leaders, including eLife, Overleaf, and Editorial Manager, all committed to creating valid assertions about scholarly connectivity in a reliable, trustworthy, and transparent way.

Laure Haak, Executive Director of ORCID, said “ScienceOpen has been a huge supporter of ORCID – both by demonstrating in practice how iDs enable profile platforms and also through your incredible researcher engagement activities.  Our badges are a small but important official acknowledgement for your actions. Thank you for your leadership in the open research community!”

In:  Announcements  

ScienceOpen supports the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC)

Today, the I4OC (Initiative for Open Citations) announced new supporting publishers joining to release reference data for more than 16 million articles. This is a major step forward as publishers such as Emerald, the American Physical Society, SciELO and De Gruyter team up with Springer/Nature, Wiley, Sage and many more to unlock the powerful information encoded in citation networks.

ScienceOpen joins the growing list of stakeholders who support the I4OC initiative, alongside OASPA (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association), Jisc, and the LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries).

You can find all references contained within any article record on ScienceOpen

What does ScienceOpen have to do with the I4OC?

The analysis of citation data is at the core of what we do at ScienceOpen. Citations trace academic networks, describe research genealogies, and uncover ideas. They enable a great range of functions dependent on the connections and context that they reveal to us.

There are several ways in which we use citation data at ScienceOpen:

  1. To sort publications by citation numbers. There are nearly always too many papers to read through them all. So every search result list on ScienceOpen can be filtered and sorted by citation numbers to find relevant articles. This powerful filter is supplemented by Altmetric score, usage, date, and more.
  2. To sort reference lists by citation numbers. The reference list of a paper is an important discovery tool for researchers, but often with 50-100 references. The sort and search tools at ScienceOpen allow both a quick overview and in depth searching within the reference section – now for many more papers with the I4OC initiative!
  3. To increase visibility of open content. If your article cites 50 papers, there will be 50 more article pages on ScienceOpen that point back to your original paper. The increased linkage helps to define networks of similarity that show the right paper to the user searching for information.
  4. To provide citation information for any author on our platform. Integrate your ORCID and claim your publications today, and you can track your citations through time.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen supports the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC)”  

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