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McGill Professors/MUHC RI scientists launch new Point-Of-Care Testing (POCT) Super Collection on Infectious Diseases on ScienceOpen

For the original press release, see our Press Room and Knowledgespeak

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce six new collections on Point-Of-Care Testing technologies  curated and organized by a team led  by Dr. Nitika Pant Pai, MD., MPH., PhD—a tenured Associate Professor at McGill University in the Department of Medicine and a Research Scientist at the MUHC Research Institute—as active contributions to the mission of open science medicine research for a positive global impact in healthcare. Her trainees, Anna De Waal, Alexie Kim, Nandi Belinsky, joined her in curating this collection. Continue reading “McGill Professors/MUHC RI scientists launch new Point-Of-Care Testing (POCT) Super Collection on Infectious Diseases on ScienceOpen”  

Submit an article review and win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet!

To celebrate the winter holidays and reward one lucky researcher, we would like to announce a prize draw to win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet this month! To participate, all you need to do is review an article on ScienceOpen before the end of December and we will automatically consider you for the drawing.

An article review on ScienceOpen functions like a book review – it should help readers to understand the strengths and weaknesses of an interpretation or a data set. As an expert, you can review any article in your field across 49 million article records on our platform. Reviewing requires an ORCID and 5 publications. Interested in reviewing an article but don’t have 5 publications linked to your ORCID? Contact us! Your review will receive a Crossref DOI and can be linked to your ORCID publication record. Continue reading “Submit an article review and win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet!”  

ScienceOpen Countdown Calendar to New Year 2019

Happy holidays from ScienceOpen! We hope you are enjoying the treats of the winter season and wish you much happiness and success for the upcoming festivities.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all our users, collection editors, and partners who have supported ScienceOpen this year and contributed to making science more open.

Discover the ScienceOpen collections

To celebrate the winter season and the upcoming holidays, we have created a countdown calendar from December 1 to the New Year, each day featuring one special researcher-led collection. Every day will be an opportunity to discover a new collection, learn more about a research field, and interact with the scientific community using our free full suite of tools for researchers. Take this time to satisfy your curiosity about science and discover the world through the eyes of expert research-explorers. Continue reading “ScienceOpen Countdown Calendar to New Year 2019”  

New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

Source: pixabay.com

To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading “New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”  

New research in materials science on ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Michael de Volder, Carbon Nanotube Lanterns, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

For the official press release, visit our Press Room, STM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

At the border between chemistry and physics, between basic and industrial research, materials science draws inspiration from interdisciplinarity. It embraces a myriad of scientific disciplines—from established fields such as metallurgy and medicine, to ongoing research in nanotechnology and computer science—to develop countless products and technologies for a more comfortable and sustainable future. How ever we categorize it, discovering and engineering new materials to meet our modern challenges is crucial to our competitive technological global society.

How are ScienceOpen users working with materials science content on the platform? Researchers have started collections on silicon thin film solar cells, electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), photoluminescent nanomaterials, EU NanoSafety Cluster publications (journal articles), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We welcome more researcher-led collections in materials science so contact us today for editor status.

To bring together and increase the visibility of the latest materials research, ScienceOpen has joined efforts with Carl Hanser Verlag in a partnership that integrates all of Hanser’s journal content and highlights the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) in the ScienceOpen discovery environment in the form of a featured collection. Continue reading “New research in materials science on ScienceOpen”  

ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science

Suzhou, China

See below for the Chinese language translation.

ScienceOpen and CompuScript/International Science Editing partnership in China

For the formal press release, see our Press RoomSTM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

Chinese researchers face tremendous hurdles in communicating their research results to the rest of the world – from language barriers to internet restrictions and the traditional western bias of the scientific literature.

Confronted with the danger of being left out of the global scholarly communications, Chinese editors often publish in partnerships with publishers outside of China. This often leaves them having to give up control over the content to their global partners. However, to increase the discoverability of Chinese research in wider scientific circles, journals based in China now have new options to reach out to international audiences.

Over their 15-year history in China, CompuScript/International Science Editing—a leading European provider of publishing services to the scientific community headquartered in Ireland—have built a strong local network to help overcome these challenges, providing editorial and technical support to Chinese researchers, editors, and institutions. To support Chinese researchers and publishers and contribute to the mission of global open science, CompuScript/International Science Editing in China and ScienceOpen have partnered up to develop new products tailored specifically for the Chinese market and to utilize the full set of tools ScienceOpen offers for greater discoverability of Chinese research. Continue reading “ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science”  

Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen

Image credit: Fotolia

You can now publish your preprint directly to ScienceOpen. The discovery platform ScienceOpen will put your work in context and open it up to review with a wide range of author-mediated peer review tools.

Preprints, first draft research manuscripts, have existed almost as long as the Internet. Scientists have been taking advantage of online communication to speed up research for almost 3 decades. ScienceOpen understands the importance of allowing researchers to openly share their results with the scientific community at an early stage in their research. The advantage for researchers is that they get early feedback from peers but can still publish the final version in most peer-reviewed journals of their choosing. To support researchers in fully utilizing the benefits of preprint publishing, ScienceOpen is pleased to launch open and free preprint publishing on our platform! With this beta service, anyone can now upload, publish, and promote their preprint using a free and simple interface with access to a full suite of tools for peer review, constructive discussion through comments, and usage and impact tracking.

We have supported the essential role of preprints in speeding up science from the beginning by integrating arXiv preprints on the platform. Records for over 27,000 bioRxiv preprints in our discovery environment followed suit, along with the capacity to add records from other preprint serves such as Preprints.org, PeerJ Preprints, ChemRxiv, and Open Science Framework repositories. Given our belief in the benefits of preprints in advancing science, it seemed only logical to develop a new feature that will enable all researchers to take advantage of preprints in scholarly research and communications. Continue reading “Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen”  

Diverse Approaches to Peer Review

Portrait of Albert Einstein in a museum. Source: pixabay.com

Peer Review Week, Sep 10-15, 2018

Peer Review Week is a global event celebrating the role of peer review in maintaining scientific quality. This year marks the event’s fourth anniversary of bringing together researchers, institutions, and organizations committed to the message that good peer review is crucial to scholarly communications. This year Peer Review Week on the topic of diversity aims:

  • To emphasize the central role peer review plays in scholarly communication
  • To showcase the work of editors and reviewers
  • To share research and advance best practices
  • To highlight the latest innovation and applications.
    (Source: https://peerreviewweek.wordpress.com/)

Although peer review itself is not as young as the week-long event organized in its celebration, it is still a relatively new invention. Albert Einstein published his original papers in non-peer-reviewed German journals through 1933, most famously in the Annalen der Physik. Max Planck, one of the journal’s editors of the time, described his editorial philosophy as:

To shun much more the reproach of having suppressed strange opinions than that of having been too gentle in evaluating them.

After moving to the US, Einstein was so shocked that his paper submitted to the Physical Review in 1936 was met with negative criticism that he decided not to publish with them at all. Ironically, the paper in question hypothesized that gravitational waves do not exist. In retrospect, peer review saved Einstein the controversy and the embarrassment that would have ensued if he had published his original article. Continue reading “Diverse Approaches to Peer Review”  

The British Journal of Pharmacy joins ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Adrian Scottow, Pharmacy, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce a partnership with the University of Huddersfield Press, a primarily open access publisher of high quality research, to promote the British Journal of Pharmacy – a new featured collection of scientific articles in pharmaceutical sciences.

British Journal of Pharmacy is an online, peer-reviewed, open access journal with no article processing charges (APCs). This publication is a product of University of Huddersfield Press’ mission to improve access to scholarly work for the benefit of all by publishing innovative research as open access. The journal publishes research on the latest developments in pharmacy in the form of scholarly papers and critical reviews. Submissions can be accepted from a wide range of pharmaceutical sciences including, among others: pharmacy, molecular pharmacy, drug delivery and targeting, pharmacoeconomics, pharmacokinetics and therapeutics, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry, pharmacovigilance, and innovations in teaching pharmacy.

University Press & Marketing Manager, Megan Taylor, said “The University of Huddersfield Press aims to improve access to scholarly research for all – we are looking forward to working with ScienceOpen to make our innovative research available to even wider audiences.” Continue reading “The British Journal of Pharmacy joins ScienceOpen”  

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