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Month: September 2016

In:  Aggregation  

New partnership with River Publishers

At ScienceOpen, we offer next-generation indexing services to publishers. The purpose of this for publishers is to:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique platform
  • Open up the context of your content

Recently, we have partnered with River Publishers to highlight two of their Open Access journals.

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In:  Peer Review  

The future of peer review is now!

It’s the most wondrous time of the year! Peer Review Week is the time when the scholarly communications community comes together to recognise the importance and value of peer review and peer reviewers.

This year, the theme is all about Recognising Review, and the valiant efforts of the research community in performing and managing peer review.

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To celebrate this, and discuss the topic further, we will be holding a webinar on September 19th at 11AM GMT all about new and future approaches for acknowledging the peer review process.

Continue reading “The future of peer review is now!”  

In:  Other  

A whistle-stop tour of Open Access in China

Open Access is not a research issue. It’s not a European issue. It’s not a publisher or policy issue. Open Access is a global issue.

Knowledge is a public good, and forms the basis of an environment in which everyone can develop and build inclusively. It can help to inspire publication innovation and entrepreneurship. Open Access to research sits at the core of this on a global level.

As part of our ‘Open Science Stars’ series, we’ve been trying to expose some of the views and experiences of people from the world of open around the world. This global perspective is important, because researchers have a responsibility to contribute to the open sharing of results around the world, and not take a free ride based on elite privilege.

Open Access and China

Today, we wanted to delve a bit into the status of OA in China. Recently, we partnered with Higher Education Press, one of the top publishers in China, to index one of their flagship journals, and to demonstrate China’s continued support for more open research practices. China has committed to rapid growth in scientific research and development recently, and this is reflected in the solid evidence for a strongly developing open access research base.

Continue reading “A whistle-stop tour of Open Access in China”  

Chris Hartgerink: A champion of Open Science

The Open Science Stars series has been one of the most pleasurable aspects for me of working at ScienceOpen, seeing the great diversity of researchers all around the world working to make science a better field to be in. For the latest, we spoke with Chris Hartgerink, a PhD student at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. Chris has a strong background in open research practices, and is a prolific member of the data mining community. Here’s his story!

When did you first hear about ‘open science’? What was your first reaction, do you remember?

Credit: Chris Hartgerink
Credit: Chris Hartgerink

I first heard about Open Science in late 2012/early 2013 during my Masters. My then supervisor (Jelte Wicherts) said to me, “Let’s put all this online”, and I remember thinking this seemed so obvious but that I simply hadn’t considered it before – nor had I been taught about this during my education. This helped multiple puzzle pieces to fall into place. Since then transparent research has been central to all that I do. I also remember asking myself how to do this because it is non-trivial if you simply know nothing about it, and it has been a gradual process since then learning how to share in an easy-to-comprehend way. But it doesn’t have to be perfect from the beginning because open science is more a way of approaching science than it is a checkmark.

What has inspired your dedication to open research? What sort of things do you do on a daily basis to commit to this?

To be honest, what you call dedication is an ethical responsibility in my eyes. The old, opaque way of doing science is based on the analogue age with severely outdated standards. This is irresponsible, just like a current-day astronomer using Galileo’s antique telescope would be irresponsible. This antique telescope gives relatively imprecise measures compared to modern telescopes, so nobody would pay attention to new results based on it. I don’t think the science done with the antique telescope in the old days is invalid, I just think we have to build on the old, create the new, and then use the new. Closed research, as you might call it, is stuck in the old. I would even go so far to say that such unnecessarily (!) closed research obfuscates science and can be deemed pseudo-science. I hardly pay attention to new research that is unverifiable.

The old, opaque way of doing science is based on the analogue age with severely outdated standards.

By the way, when I say irresponsible, I mean irresponsible to others and to yourself. Our work is complex and making your work shareable and understandable to others helps others to understand what you did – including your future self. Transparent research has saved my skin repeatedly.

Continue reading “Chris Hartgerink: A champion of Open Science”  

In:  Peer Review  

Are you a champion of open peer review?

Peer review week is almost upon us, yippee! Taking place from the 19-26th of September, this is a global event for celebrating the critical role that peer review plays in the scholarly communication process.

The theme this week is recognising peer review, something that at ScienceOpen we’ve been passionate about since our inception. Other science startups like Publons have already launched amazing initiatives like their Sentinels of Science campaign, well worth checking out. For updates, follow the #RecognizeReview hashtag on Twitter!

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This theme couldn’t be better timed. At the moment in scholarly publishing and communications, there’s something of a renaissance happening where we’re exploring aspects of recognising all the different types of review activity, including in publishing, research grants, conference submissions, and promotion and tenure.

Continue reading “Are you a champion of open peer review?”  

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