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Month: April 2017

In:  Collections  
Another researcher-led collection ticked off!

Another researcher-led collection ticked off!

We have a brand new collection that’s just itching for interaction on Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens! It contains more than 11,000 peer reviewed research articles, with a combined readership of almost 50,000 on our platform already.

ScienceOpen users can read, share, recommend, review, and apply all of our advanced search and discovery tools to this collection, including applying our recently launched ‘Open Access’ filter.

This collection is focused on the wide field of research on ticks and tick-transmitted pathogens. It aims to include papers on a wide variety of disciplines related to ticks and the pathogens they transmit, focused (but not limited) to morphology and systematics of ticks, ecology, reports of pathogens in both ticks and their hosts. A secondary aim is to provide global view of the effects of climate and land use changes on the pattern of distribution of these arthropods.

We spoke with the collection Editor, Professor Agustín Estrada-Peña, about why he decided to build this collection for his research community.

(Source)

Can you tell us why you tell us about your research interests in ticks and tick-borne diseases?

I am Agustín Estrada-Peña. I have several titles behind my name, but they do not have importance in this context. Let’s just say that I am Professor of Zoonoses and Parasitology in the University of Zaragoza (Spain). My work is focused on ticks and tick-transmitted organisms. I did work on systematics, physiology, life cycles, and the probable impact of environmental change on the pathogens they can transmit. I have been enrolled with FAO, WHO, and recently with the European Center for Disease Control in different aspects regarding human and animal health and ticks. My current interest is on the way the ecological relationships between ticks, microorganisms and vertebrates emerged and evolved. I am working on new ways to explore these relationships and on the molecular aspects behind them.

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Matters matter. Recent additions from the field of materials science

Expanding the limits of the materials available and thereby satisfying everyday needs was always a key challenge and the cornerstone of human cultural development. The constant discovery and development of new materials and the improvement of their performance to meet the challenges of the current day world grew out to be a faster and faster evolving discipline called Materials Science in the competitive global economy.

From nanotechnology, metallurgy, medical technology, aviation or computer science, materials science is used to advance understanding in a variety of research areas in order to develop smart oil refinery components, bioactive hip implants, the safest cars, the lightest notebooks and countless other new products and technologies that will make our lives safer, more sustainable and more convenient.

We at ScienceOpen want to be a part of this story. Our new partnerships with Carl Hanser Verlag, AIMS Press and Italian Group of Fracture (Gruppo Italiano Frattura) allow us to bring together the latest result of this diverse field.

Below you can find the journals now indexed on our site, and a teaser from their selected articles. Take a peek!

International Polymer Processing

As a result of our new partnership with Carl Hanser Verlag, two of their e-journals from the field of materials science, International Polymer Processing (IPP) and HTM Journal of Heat Treatment and Materials are now indexed on ScienceOpen.

IPP is dedicated to the study of polymers. As such, the journal offers original research contributions, invited review papers and recent technological developments in processing thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers and fibers as well as polymer reaction engineering. For more than 25 years IPP, the journal of the Polymer Processing Society, provides strictly peer-reviewed, high-quality articles and rapid communications from the leading experts around the world. Articles cover topics like:

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In:  Other  

ScienceOpen is marching for science!

This week, on Saturday, April 22nd (Earth Day) the global science-interested community is uniting to march for science across the world. Many of our members will be joining the March for Science in Washington DC and other cities around the world.

The March for Science is about the role that science plays in our everyday lives, but also about political activism for researchers, celebrating the diversity of research cultures, and making sure that policy developments are grounded in strong evidence.

You can follow the events live on Twitter at #MarchForScience

ScienceOpen will be part of the global march, and in five different locations! A more informed dialogue between scientists and citizens requires openness, transparency, and access to information – one of the key mission statements of ScienceOpen, and the reason we will be out marching in force.

CEO Stephanie Dawson will be marching in Berlin, Germany, with other members of our team there. Find her on Twitter and join them here!

Prof. Alexander Grossman, co-founder of ScienceOpen, will be taking to the streets in Leipzig, Germany. Get in touch here.

Tibor Tscheke, the other co-founder of ScienceOpen, will also be marching in Boston, USA! Contact him here.

Jon Tennant will be in Seattle, USA, joining the Science March as part of the Sage Bionetworks Assembly. Contact him here.

Erzsébet Toth-Czifra will be marching in Budapest, Hungary, too, and you can reach her here.

We welcome anyone and everyone to stand by our sides with the rest of the march, and together celebrate science as a global community!

In:  Announcements  

New free indexing competition winners

ScienceOpen offers free indexing to Open Access journals that are free for authors to publish in, as part of our mission to enhance open scholarship.

We recently partnered with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) to help make these valuable contributions to the scholarly record more visible.

In the latest round of our indexing competition, we are pleased to announce three new journals from across Europe that will be integrated into and promoted on our platform. These are:

  • Management: Journal of Contemporary Management Issues, from Croatia

Published by the University of Split, this journal publishes articles from the Social Sciences, including topics in industries, land use, labour, and industrial management.

  • Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, from Spain

Published by the Universidad de La Laguna, this journal publishes articles in Spanish, Castilian, and English in the fields of Language and Literature, Linguistics, Communication, and the Mass Media.

  • Studia z Filologii Polskiej i Słowiańskiej, from Poland

Published by the Institute of Slavic Studies at the Polish Academy of Sciences, this journal publishes articles from the field of Linguistics in Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, and English.

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In:  Peer Review  

A new gold standard of peer review is needed

How can something exclusive, secretive, and irreproducible be considered to be objective? How can something exclusive, secretive, and irreproducible be considered as a ‘gold standard’ of any sort?

Traditional, closed peer review has these traits, but yet for some reason held in esteem as the most rigorous and objective standard of research and knowledge generation that we have. Peer review fails peer review, and its own test of integrity and validation, and is one of the greatest ironies of the academic world.

What we need is a new standard of peer review that is suitable for a Web-based world of scholarly communication. This is to help accommodate the increasingly rapid communication of research and new sources of information, and bring peer review out of the dark (literally) ages and into one which makes sense in a world of fast, open, digital knowledge dissemination.

What should a standard for peer review look like in 2017?

The big test for peer review, and any future version of it, is how does the scientific community apply its stamp of approval?

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