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Month: July 2018

New featured collection: Trace Elements and Electrolytes

Ever wondered about the relationship between mental strain and Magnesium loss? Or questioned whether there is more to transdermal absorption of magnesium than make-believe? Maybe you have heard that effort, performance, and recreation need can be predicted by metabolic markers including electrolytes?  If you would like to find answers to the many questions related to trace elements and electrolytes, look no further than the brand new online collection of articles published by Dustri-Verlag on ScienceOpen: Trace Elements and Electrolytes.

ScienceOpen and Dustri-Verlag, a German publishing house specializing in medical literature, are happy to announce that the first 39 articles from Dustri’s international English-language journal Trace Elements and Electrolytes have found a new form of representation in the collection of the same name. Embedded in the ScienceOpen platform, you can filter these articles by publication date, title, discipline and much more, as well as sort your results by Altmetric score, view count, citations, date, relevance, and rating.

Dustri’s Trace Elements and Electrolytes is a quarterly journal that publishes reviews and editorials, original papers, short communications, and reports on recent advances in the entire field of trace elements. This journal accepts papers on experimental findings if they bear a close relationship to human diseases. It also publishes correspondence (letters to editors) and current information, including book announcements. Managed by Jörg Feistle, Trace Elements and Electrolytes is the official organ of “Society of Magnesium Research”, Germany, and the German Working Group “Trace Elements and Electrolytes in Radiation Oncology” AKTE Germany.

ScienceOpen and Dustri-Verlag believe that Trace Elements and Electrolytes, a collection of carefully curated peer-reviewed scientific articles, will be helpful to all researchers studying trace elements and electrolytes. We invite you to discuss and engage with its diverse content through the many tools our interactive platform has to offer or to help spread the word on social media about scientific topics such as Boron’s potentially essential role in the metabolism of the connective tissue of the biological bone matrix, the role of serum zinc and copper levels in predicting malignancy in differentiated thyroid cancers, or how the levels of homocysteine and zinc could be an important parameter in the follow-up of hypertension.

In:  About SO  

How can you search on ScienceOpen?

Source: pixabay.com

 

 

ScienceOpen has a myriad of features and filters to help you navigate through the 43 million records published on our platform. How many of them are you familiar with? Our customized search engine enables users to quickly find articles they are looking for. Familiarizing yourself with our easily accessible features can save you time on the technicalities. For example, did you know that you can save and export any search results or filter articles for preprints?

 

 

Filters

Open Access
If are interested in Open Access (OA) publications on ScienceOpen, you can easily filter your search to return only those results. Simply click on ‘Add Filter’ below the search(box), then click on ‘Open Access’ and hit the ‘Search’ button. Your results now include exclusively OA records.

Preprint Filter

To help users find preprints, searches on ScienceOpen can be filtered to look up only preprints or to exclude them if you are looking for peer-reviewed literature. Our preprint records come directly from Crossref or arXiv.

To select only preprints on ScienceOpen, simply click on the ‘Preprint’ filter and then click/hit ‘Search’ again. This will restrict your returned search results accordingly. You can then further sort by:

  • Altmetric score
  • Average rating
  • Cited by count
  • Date of publication
  • View count
  • Relevance

Save and export searches

Save search

The ‘Save search’ button enables you to be up to date with the latest content added to the platform with just one click. ScienceOpen is integrating thousands of articles to the database every day. By saving your searches, you also save time and can directly access new and previously (un)read articles in your field(s) of interests.

Export search results

ScienceOpen’s search engine offers a lot of flexibility thanks to its sort and filter options. You can not only save your filtered and sorted search results but also export them or any other article list on ScienceOpen as references in one of these three formats: EndNote, BibTex, and Reference Manager (RIS). These formats are easily integrated with your reference management systems. You can export up to 200 citations at a time.

Export citation

On top of any articles list, each ScienceOpen article, across our 43 million records, has an ‘Export citation’ button. You can export any individual ScienceOpen article to your reference manager. Just like with exporting your search queries, the articles are exported in either EndNote, BibTex, or RIS format.

Bookmarking

Did you know that you can bookmark articles on ScienceOpen? Simply click on the ‘Bookmark’ button on the article page and build your own personal collection of hand-picked records that you can always go back to explore and edit.

Let us know if you have any questions or feedback! Write to inasa.bibic@scienceopen.com.

In:  Collections, Other  

Oceans and Human Impact

Old Mug by Heath Alseike, Flickr, CC BY-SA

In recognition of World’s Oceans Day, ScienceOpen hosted a special article collection published by nonprofit Annual Reviews that address the topics of marine pollution, human impact and environmental stewardship, and marine species’ adaptation. The Oceans collection aims to raise awareness about the grave consequences of plastic debris in our oceans and the overall impact humans have on the marine environment.

Plastics contamination was first reported nearly 50 years ago, following the rise of commercial plastics production. According to ‘Plastics in the Marine Environment’ by Kara Laveder Law, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year in 2014. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats. In her article, Law presents a framework to evaluate the current “understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics”. In a similar vein, ‘Plastic as a Persistent Marine Pollutant’ by Boris Worm et al. discusses how marine plastics work their way into the food web in the first place. This article further presents the complex toxicology of plastic particles on marine life and how plastic can transfer up the food chain. Worm et al. offer solutions to the current crisis by suggesting a Global Convention on Plastic Pollution as a collaboration between “governments, producers, scientists, and citizens”.

In Kenneth R. Weiss’ interview with environmental engineer Jenna Jambeck—one of the co-authors of Plastic as a Persistent Marine Pollutant’—we discover that the pileup of plastic debris is more than ugly ocean litter. Jambeck argues that plastic gets consumed by marine organisms, which can be detrimental for both wildlife and humans:

 “Even though plastics are hard materials, at the microscopic level they absorb persistent organic compounds. Persistent organic pollutants like DDT, PCBs, flame retardants and fabric treatments have an affinity for plastic. Plastics act like sponges, soaking them up.”

According to Jambeck, humans consume this polluted plastic by eating whole animals such as oysters and clams. This is an unavoidable consequence of ocean plastic pollution since long-chain polymers found in plastic “don’t really biodegrade”. Jambeck urges for the reduction of plastic production and new ways to deliver products with less waste.

Living Coral Reefs by Cyrene, Flickr, CC BY-SA

As if plastic debris was not enough of a problem, oceans face acidification and climate change which, as argued by  Kenneth R.N. Anthony in ‘Coral Reefs Under Climate Change and Ocean Acidification: Challenges and Opportunities for Management and Policy’, is a cause of carbon emissions in industrialized countries. This is a major issue for coral reefs as climate change drives ocean warming, which in turn impacts biological and ecological reef processes, triggers large-scale coral bleaching events, and fuels tropical storms. Ocean acidification contributes to the decay of coral reefs by slowing reef growth, altering competitive interactions, and impairing population replenishment. The role of the coral microbiome in coral resilience, acclimation and environmental adaptation is addressed in detail in ‘Insights into the Coral Microbiome: Underpinning the Health and Resilience of Reef Ecosystems’ by Bourne, Morrow and Webster.

In the light of Plastic Free July, a global movement for a world without plastic waste, we hope this collection will help spread the word about the current state of the oceans and urge everyone to act and contribute to saving the oceans. According to Elissa Pearson et al., one of the best ways to do so is by participating in awareness-raising campaigns on social media. Read ‘Can We Tweet, Post, and Share Our Way to a More Sustainable Society? A Review of the Current Contributions and Future Potential of #Socialmediaforsustainability’ and decide for yourself whether social media can contribute to the sustainability goal. If you agree, we look forward to taking the discussion on oceans to ScienceOpen’s social media platforms!

Oceans is available online for free through July 31, 2018 and always available at subscribing institutions.

Beyond the Journal: ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society Launch Collaboration on New Cross-Disciplinary Collections

For formal press release, see our Press RoomKnowledgespeak and Information Today, Inc.

 

ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society are pleased to announce a collaboration on new ways to showcase cross-disciplinary research. The ScienceOpen discovery environment provides state-of-the-art technological infrastructure to promote exciting new initiatives from the Society’s journals.

Interdisciplinarity is key for the Microbiology Society in reaching a wide range of researchers, from microbiologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, social scientists and policymakers to physicists, chemists and engineers. In line with their mission to advance the understanding and impact of microbiology by connecting communities worldwide, the Society is exploring new ways to package digital information, from pop-up journals to mini-review formats, to bring diverse researchers together to solve global problems.

ScienceOpen has created a flexible “Collection” product to highlight publisher content within the larger context of academic research – with over 43 million articles and records on the site. The Microbiology Society is taking advantage of the full scope of interactive features available to researchers on ScienceOpen. As well as promoting the Open Access journal Microbial Genomics, the Society is using ScienceOpen to promote cross-disciplinary products that draw on articles from multiple journals, such as the new pop-up journal on antimicrobial resistance X-AMR, the Microbiome collection created in conjunction with the British Society for Immunology, and the Microbe and Virus Profiles created in conjunction with top microbiologists and the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, both of which offer concise reviews for experts and beyond.

Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Director of Publishing at the Microbiology Society, believes “As publishers, we have to reach out to researchers on the platforms they use, rather than expecting them to come to us. ScienceOpen offers us an opportunity to do that. The new Collections offering is a great supplement to the journal promotion tools on the platform, and we’ve particularly appreciated being able to curate collections that draw on content from multiple journals and even multiple publishers”.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are excited about these new collections that go beyond the journal. As a discovery platform ScienceOpen is uniquely situated to help advance cross-disciplinary research. We aim to support publishers in reaching new audiences and authors in this space with our Collection product.”

A range of aggregated collection- and article-level metrics will provide enriched usage statistics to track the success of these experiments in ScienceOpen’s continuously expanding research database.

About ScienceOpen: ScienceOpen, founded in 2013 in Berlin and Boston by Alexander Grossmann and Tibor Tscheke, is a freely-accessible, interactive discovery platform for scholarly research. From smart, multidimensional search to research collections and open peer review, it offers a full spectrum of options to effectively find and share research results.

About the Microbiology Society: The Microbiology Society is a membership charity for scientists interested in microbes, their effects and their practical uses. It is one of the largest microbiology societies in Europe, with a worldwide membership based in universities, hospitals, research institutes and schools.

In:  About SO  

What can a Researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Image by Steve Rainwater, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen provides researchers with a wide range of tools to support their research – all for free. Here is a short checklist to make sure you are getting the most of the technological infrastructure and content that we have to offer. What can a researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Discover

  • Multi-dimensional search in millions of article records for quick orientation: Filter your search by 18 filters including open access, preprint, author, affiliation, keyword, content type, source, and more. Sort your results by Altmetric score, citations, date, usage, and rating. Use the article Collections by other researchers to help narrow your search.
  • Export search results in EndNote, BibTex, and Reference Manager (RIS) formats for easy integration with other reference management systems. Up to 200 citations exported at a time.
  • Save your search to find the newest articles in your field with one click. ScienceOpen is adding thousands of articles to the database daily.
  • Bookmark the articles you are interested to explore later.

Create

  • Edit a Collection to present the best research in your field for better discovery by your peers. Or, run it as an overlay “journal” with the newest preprints. Create a comprehensive bibliography of a subject or just highlight the top 20 papers in your discipline. The Collection functionality is built to flexibly meet a wide range of goals for the research community.
  • Review an article to share your expertise with the community. An article review, similar to a book review, provides an analysis of the work and recommendations to readers. A review on ScienceOpen is linked with ORCID and published with a Crossref DOI and best-practice XML metadata for discovery across all systems. To ensure expert reviews, the ScienceOpen requires 5 publications for automatic reviewer status. We make exceptions on an individual basis, so just get in touch with the ScienceOpen team if you would like to review (info@scienceopen.com). You can also invite any researcher to review an article with one click.
  • Write an Author Summary to explain your research in plain language to the general public. You can add a summary, thumbnail image, keywords, and disciplines to your article record on ScienceOpen to increase the discoverability of your research.
  • Articles missing? You can help us to improve the ScienceOpen database by uploading the DOIs of important articles that you are missing on the site. You can then add these to your Collection, publication list, or bookmarks.

Network

  • Your ScienceOpen Profile is integrated with ORCID for a low-maintenance presence on the platform. Add publications from or to your ORCID record with one click. Biography, affiliation, education, and more can be synchronized with ORCID.
  • An interactive bibliography on ScienceOpen opens your publications to search and sort by altmetrics, citations, date, and more. Gain insight about your own work and share with your colleagues
  • Track usage, citations, altmetrics of your publications on ScienceOpen and watch it develop over time. A whole suite of metrics are available at your fingertips.
  • Follow researchers for updates on their activities and to expand your network.

We love to hear back from our users about features that are particularly useful or ones that are missing. Just get in touch at feedback@scienceopen.com or on Twitter @Science_Open or Facebook.