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New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

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To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for.

Martin Paul Eve, Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London and a CEO of the Open Library of Humanities said: “we have been delighted by the response of the linguistics community to the launch of Glossa. The study of language, across cultures, is an area in which open access makes eminent sense. By including these collections in ScienceOpen we hope to assist with the discoverability of this material and to ensure the broadest audience for the study of linguistics.”

The latest research presented in ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ includes an investigation of an understudied type of RTO construction in the Philippine-type Austronesian language Puyuma in ‘The raising-to-object construction in Puyuma and its implications for a typology of RTO’; a discussion on the use of big corpuses or databases as a first step for qualitative analysis of linguistic data in ‘Exploiting microvariation: How to make your best with incomplete data’; a focused analysis of subject extraction in Māori, the indigenous Polynesian language of New Zealand, in ‘Māori subject extraction’; an experiment to determine the extent to which concept pre-activation and the function of the definite and indefinite article affect referent activation during retrieval and integration as well as referent activation at the sentence level in ‘A Dual-Process Activation Model: Processing definiteness and information status’; and, among others, a thorough theoretical investigation of the sign language phenomenon in ‘The syntax of sign language agreement: Common ingredients, but unusual recipe’.

In addition to diverse scholarship in ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’, ScienceOpen now indexes research on Portuguese linguistics and scientific study of phonological and phonetic aspects of language in the form of  featured collections ‘Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’ and ‘Laboratory Phonology’.

Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’ is concerned with all branches of linguistics and aims at publishing high-quality papers in the field of Portuguese linguistics, including the comparison between any varieties of Portuguese and any other language(s). This English-language online journal welcomes contributions from linguists in all countries, and from different linguistic theories and frameworks, including theoretically oriented work, comparative work, experimental studies, and interdisciplinary contributions.

Laboratory Phonology’ is the official open access journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology. It publishes reports on the scientific study of all phonological/phonetic aspects of spoken and signed language through scholarly exchange across disciplines, including all domains of linguistics (phonology, phonetics, syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics), as well as from related disciplines, including psychology, speech & hearing science, communication science, computer science, electrical & computer engineering, and other related fields.

ScienceOpen and the Open Library of Humanities believe that ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’, ‘Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’, and ‘Laboratory Phonology’ will be a great asset to all users interested in linguistics, accommodating a range of research topics in this field. We invite you to browse, discuss, and engage with our three new collections of peer-reviewed, open access articles through the many tools available on the ScienceOpen interactive platform.

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple.

So what can you do?

As you put the finishing touches on your manuscript, you can check whether a potential publisher deposits license information by checking their Crossref Participation Report (Beta). If even the word “metadata” makes you want to get back into bed – try asking your librarian for support. They are experts!

If you already paid your APC and your article has no open access symbol, contact your journal or publisher directly and ask them to deposit your license information with Crossref or get in touch with ScienceOpen directly. As a special offer until the end of the year, ScienceOpen will update publisher content for free. If a publisher lets us know that they have added license information or abstracts to their Crossref metadata, we will upgrade those records in the ScienceOpen discovery environment.

Open Access: More than a free pdf

Big data, text mining, machine learning, artificial intelligence – these are the trends in scholarly communication that are shaping the future already. Your open access article is not only free for humans to read, but also for computers. Computers don’t care about impact factors, they care about structured information. They can uncover fascinating connections on the basis of your research. But only if the computer understands that it has permission to read your article – hence the importance of a machine-readable Creative Commons license. You paid your APC so make sure that you get the best possible digital distribution. Celebrate this Open Access Week by making sure you get your open access symbol!

New research in materials science on ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Michael de Volder, Carbon Nanotube Lanterns, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

For the official press release, visit our Press Room, STM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

At the border between chemistry and physics, between basic and industrial research, materials science draws inspiration from interdisciplinarity. It embraces a myriad of scientific disciplines—from established fields such as metallurgy and medicine, to ongoing research in nanotechnology and computer science—to develop countless products and technologies for a more comfortable and sustainable future. How ever we categorize it, discovering and engineering new materials to meet our modern challenges is crucial to our competitive technological global society.

How are ScienceOpen users working with materials science content on the platform? Researchers have started collections on silicon thin film solar cells, electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), photoluminescent nanomaterials, EU NanoSafety Cluster publications (journal articles), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We welcome more researcher-led collections in materials science so contact us today for editor status.

To bring together and increase the visibility of the latest materials research, ScienceOpen has joined efforts with Carl Hanser Verlag in a partnership that integrates all of Hanser’s journal content and highlights the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) in the ScienceOpen discovery environment in the form of a featured collection.

Hanser’s International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) publishes original, high quality experimental and theoretical papers and reviews on basic and applied research in the field of materials science and engineering, with focus on synthesis, processing, constitution, and properties of all classes of materials. The journal is edited by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde e.V. (DGM) and co-edited by Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux (SF2M), and Swiss Association for Materials Science and Technology (SVMT). All articles submitted to the journal are published in English language.

The ‘International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR)’ features content from the leading experts around the world, covering research topics such as: ‘A simple and economic approach to superhydrophobic films’—showing that these films could resist the external force well and exhibit a durable superhydrophobicity—, ‘Effect of sensitization on tribological behavior of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel’—aiming to evaluate the dry sliding wear of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel as a function of the applied load—, ‘Effect of alumina particles on structural changes in MoS 2 during a ball milling process’—studying the morphological evolution of molybdenite using a ball milling technique—, ‘Two-stage synthesis of ultrafine powder of chromium carbide’—proposing a new method for the synthesis of ultrafine powder of chromium carbide—, and ‘Three-body abrasive wear behaviour of metastable spheroidal carbide cast irons with different chromium contents’—researching the effect of heat treatment and chromium contents (up to 9.1 wt.%) on the wear resistance of spheroidal carbide cast iron (9.5 wt.% V) using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, dilatometry and three-body abrasive testing.

ScienceOpen’s collection of articles promotes this individually published content within the larger context of over 47 million academic articles and records on the platform. Indexing the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) with ScienceOpen enhances the discoverability of Hanser’s specialized publications in the discipline of materials science thanks to the customized search engine on the ScienceOpen platform. All articles on ScienceOpen can be sorted and filtered to find relevant research. Furthermore, by using the post-publication peer review feature on ScienceOpen, researchers can keep the scientific debate about their research going long after publication.

Stephanie Dawson, CEO of ScienceOpen, stated “We are excited to add more materials science content to ScienceOpen, particularly as this research is often situated on interdisciplinary borders and between academia and industry.“

This partnership between ScienceOpen and Carl Hanser Verlag contextualizes the ‘International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR)’ within the broader research environment on ScienceOpen for the purpose of enhancing the visibility and impact of scientific research in the field of materials science.