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Author: Erzsébet Czifra-Tóth

Improve your literature review routine and get your daily dose of science with us

Literature review is a crucial aspect of scientific work, with every single published research paper requiring one as part of the Introduction. Still, keeping up with the rapidly growing body of literature can be a daunting and time consuming task, and difficult to integrate into the everyday routine for many researchers. Being not an urgent, deadline-driven kind of activity, regular literature review often lands on the bottom of to-do lists.

However, with more than 2 million research papers published each year, how are you supposed to efficiently stay on top of this?

This is especially the case in the era of digital publishing when the power of established, high impact factor journal brands is becoming less important compared to article-level metrics and individual assessments. In this dynamically changing environment of scientific communication, keeping an open mind and providing critical evaluation of the literature have never been more important.

Consequently, signing up to individual RSS feeds or browsing through the contents of each of the key journals of your field of research is simply not an efficient way to keep yourself up to date.

It’s discovery time! (source)

At ScienceOpen, we offer powerful solutions for staying on top of recently published articles. By following the 3 steps below, you can easily integrate an effective literature review and discovery routine into your research life.

Continue reading “Improve your literature review routine and get your daily dose of science with us”  

A whole new world of Open Access at ScienceOpen

Today we are pleased to announce the winners of the April round of our free Open Access indexing competition.

These journals come from around the world, and by offering free-to-publish Open Access options for researchers, we in turn offer them free integration into our platform to help build their status and visibility.

The following journals will all become part of our next-generation indexing and discovery platform:

Cardiometry (Russia)

Published by the Russian New University, this journal is devoted to cardiological issues with special focus on cardiovascular system performance and diagnostics. The title of the journal, Cardiometry, is a new field in cardiology providing application of the most up-to-date technologies of measurements of heart and cardiovascular system performance parameters and considered as an interdisciplinary scientific field joining cardiology, biophysics, biomechanics, IT and metrology.

Tobacco Prevention & Cessation (Greece)

Published by European Publishing, this journal encompasses all aspects of tobacco use, prevention and cessation that can promote a tobacco free society. Their aim is to foster, promote and disseminate research involving tobacco use, prevention, policy implementation, disease development- progression related to tobacco use, tobacco use impact from the cellular to the international level and the treatment of tobacco attributable disease through smoking cessation.

Desert (Iran)

Published by the University of Tehran, Desert covers all aspects of environmental management of arid, semi-arid and desert environments and addresses issues ranging from basic to socio-ecological systems of arid, semi-arid and desert ecosystems.

Revista do Instituto Florestal (Brazil)

Published by the Instituto Florestal (Institute of Forestry) of São Paulo, this journal is dedicated to works in Forestry Sciences and related sciences written in Portuguese, English or Spanish. It publishes articles in the following thematic areas: urban tree planting, protected areas and nature conservation, wildlife conservation, ecology, forestry policy and economy, genetics and forest improvement, geography and environmental planning, hydrology, plant taxonomy and phytogeography and forest products technology.

All of these journals fulfil the double challenge of publishing high-quality Open Access research while charging no APCs to their authors. As such, they provide significant contributions to open scholarship as well as democracy in science from month to month.

To support these great efforts, we recently partnered with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) to help make these valuable sources of the published scholarly record more visible and easily accessible in a competitive global research environment.

Bringing together results from different fields of research and geographical regions, successful applicants will add new colours to our research network of over 31 million articles and growing.

Thank you to everyone who applied for the latest round of ScienceOpen’s free indexing competition! We are also grateful to DOAJ for their valuable contributions.

To apply for the next round, an application form can be found here.  As a little help, you can find our guidelines here. Good luck!

Matters matter. Recent additions from the field of materials science

Expanding the limits of the materials available and thereby satisfying everyday needs was always a key challenge and the cornerstone of human cultural development. The constant discovery and development of new materials and the improvement of their performance to meet the challenges of the current day world grew out to be a faster and faster evolving discipline called Materials Science in the competitive global economy.

From nanotechnology, metallurgy, medical technology, aviation or computer science, materials science is used to advance understanding in a variety of research areas in order to develop smart oil refinery components, bioactive hip implants, the safest cars, the lightest notebooks and countless other new products and technologies that will make our lives safer, more sustainable and more convenient.

We at ScienceOpen want to be a part of this story. Our new partnerships with Carl Hanser Verlag, AIMS Press and Italian Group of Fracture (Gruppo Italiano Frattura) allow us to bring together the latest result of this diverse field.

Below you can find the journals now indexed on our site, and a teaser from their selected articles. Take a peek!

International Polymer Processing

As a result of our new partnership with Carl Hanser Verlag, two of their e-journals from the field of materials science, International Polymer Processing (IPP) and HTM Journal of Heat Treatment and Materials are now indexed on ScienceOpen.

IPP is dedicated to the study of polymers. As such, the journal offers original research contributions, invited review papers and recent technological developments in processing thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers and fibers as well as polymer reaction engineering. For more than 25 years IPP, the journal of the Polymer Processing Society, provides strictly peer-reviewed, high-quality articles and rapid communications from the leading experts around the world. Articles cover topics like:

Continue reading “Matters matter. Recent additions from the field of materials science”  

In:  Aggregation  

Reconciling East and West in biomedical science: Family Medicine and Community Health and Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications are now indexed on ScienceOpen

We believe that Open Access to medical research is critical for advancing health research and saving lives. Part of our mission at ScienceOpen is to bring together the latest results from different fields, and cultural and geographical regions. For this reason, we are happy to announce our new partnership with the Ireland-based publisher Compuscript, whose two biomedical journals: Family Medicine and Community Health and Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications are now indexed on ScienceOpen. Both journals publish peer reviewed, open access research articles with a focus on results from China. Let’s take a closer look at them!

Family Medicine and Community Health (FMCH)

 

Family Medicine and Community Health (FMCH)

Family Medicine and Community Health aims to promote improved healthcare through the practice of family and community-based medicine globally. The journal covers topics that are common and relevant to family medicine and community health, such as: healthcare policies, health insurance coverage, public health, epidemiology, social and preventive medicine, management of chronic illnesses, health promotion and health ethics, community health service from pediatrics to elderly care, and education and training in family medicine worldwide with a special emphasis on Chinese and developing world modalities. So it covers quite a bit of research ground!

As a publication of the Chinese General Practice Press (CGPP), Family Medicine and Community Health is able to publish open access without charging article processing charges.

Our top article selection from the journal:

A new role for primary care teams in the United States after “Obamacare:” Track and improve health insurance coverage rates

Healthy China 2030: “Without national health, there will be no comprehensive well-being”

The innovations in China’s primary health care reform: Development and characteristics of the community health services in Hangzhou

Primary care clinicians’ strategies to overcome financial barriers to specialty health care for uninsured patients

Economic burden of inpatients with viral hepatitis B-related diseases and the influencing factors

Integration of community health workers into health systems in developing countries: Opportunities and challenges

Engaging black sub-Saharan African communities and their gatekeepers in HIV prevention programs: Challenges and strategies from England

Factors associated with the utilization of institutional and home birth services among women in Ethiopia: A scoping review

Maternal health and its affecting factors in Nepal

Mothers’ health-related quality of life: Its relationship with children’s health-related quality of life and behavior in low-income families

West meets east: Chinese and US doctors addressing the medical ecology and disease management from both countries’ perspectives

Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA)

Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications is the official journal of the Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC), devoted to exploring novel developments in cardiovascular disease, and to promote cardiovascular innovations and applications for the betterment of public health globally. The journal publishes basic research that has clinical applicability relating to coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, prevention of cardiovascular disease with a heavy emphasis on risk factor modification.

The latest issue is dedicated to recent advances in noninvasive cardiac imaging, such as:

Novel SPECT Technologies and Approaches in Cardiac Imaging

Cardiac PET/CT and Prognosis

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Coronary Arteries: Latest Technical Innovations and Clinical Experiences

Novel Approaches for the Use of Cardiac/Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography

Do Modern Imaging Studies Trump Cardiovascular Physical Exam in Cardiac Patients?

All articles are now placed into a context of more than 28 million articles through our citation and recommendation network and can now be found under our brand new OA filter.

For more information about our indexing services, please contact our Marketing Manager Erik Riemenschneider (Erik.Riemenschneider@ScienceOpen.com).

We are still running our free indexing competition for APC-free open access journals, so get in touch if you qualify!

 

Picking cherries from 9 new Dove Medical Press collections

Open Access to research is perhaps nowhere more important than in the field of medicine and health. This is why we’re happy to have a huge amount of Open Access research from Dove Medical Press integrated into our platform to enhance its visibility and discoverability.

Dove Medical Press was founded in 2003 and specializes in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology, and especially medicine. As a result of our new partnership, more than 14,400 of their freely accessible articles from 9 of their top international, peer-reviewed, online journals addressing both researchers and professionals are now indexed on ScienceOpen.

Continue reading “Picking cherries from 9 new Dove Medical Press collections”  

New partnership with Karger

Publishers are continuously innovating with new formats for topical selections of literature. Today we are happy to announce our partnership with Karger, a leading biomedical publisher of international speciality journals and books covering basic and clinical research. Two of their thematic articles packages, one on Stroke and another one on Diabetes are now indexed on our platform.

Karger Topical Article Packages, our recent additions to the field of medicine, aim to support researchers in keeping up with the vast and rapidly growing research literature, and provide the quality assurance of rigorous peer review and editorial selection. Last year alone PubMed tracked 38,000 articles on diabetes and over 18,000 on stroke. With these numbers, editorial selection is a great help for researchers.

A unique feature of these collections is that their scope is not restricted to just one journal. Instead, they provide topical selections from across the entire range of the Karger publishing program. Articles are selected on the basis of a keyword-related semantic search on the abstract level. Such a relevance-based organizing principle results in a quick and convenient overview of the latest methodological and technological developments from one of the leading biomedical publishers.

From here, you can apply all the usual enhanced search and discovery filtering options, including sorting content by date, citations, Altmetric score, and readership, as well as discovering related content from across our network of 28 million research articles. For researchers, this is a great way of staying in touch with the latest and most relevant research published in your field.

Below you can find a teaser from their main topics and selected articles.

1. Stroke: Karger Topic Article Package

Being one of the leading cause of death and various physical, psychological and social disabilities, research on Stroke is an essential subfield of Biomedical Science.  The new collection covers the most recent advances in the field. Some of the most important topics covered include:

2. Diabetes: Karger Topical Article Package

The collection brings together peer reviewed research articles from more than 20 journals and covers the latest developments, solutions and best practices in the curation and prevention of Diabetes and its many complications. Some of the main topics covered are:

The thematic and article-level perspective of these collections is a new direction in content curation beyond the journal that we are happy to experiment with together with Karger. They also fit well into our current research network: 42.151 articles on Stroke and 122.570 articles on Diabetes opens up the wider research context for these two collections and helps aid discovery while expanding our knowledge horizons.

Our search pages also work at the collection and journal levels help you quickly and easily find exactly what research you are looking for.

If you have any feedback on our search and discovery functions, please contact us here. And if you are a publisher looking to integrate your content and enhance its context and visibility, please contact us here.

 

 

In:  Other  

Guidelines for free indexing applicants

Publishing can be a big, expensive business, or it can be done on a small scale by research communities themselves – by researchers for researchers. For very narrow topics and small research communities it can make sense to just do it yourself and there are wide range of journals that offer a formal peer review process, editorial oversight, publishing services and a Creative Commons open access license to authors but still charge no APCs.

To support these great efforts, ScienceOpen offers free indexing for up to 10 APC-free OA journals per month, and the best candidate receives a free journal collection page for 1 year. We are pleased to announce a partnership with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in making these valuable contributions to the scholarly record more visible.

In order to qualify for our free indexing offer your journal must meet the following requirements, all of which contribute to enhancing the visibility and discoverability of your content.

  • Be indexed in DOAJ and without publication charges

The Directory of Open Access Journals lists over 9000 open access scholarly journals meeting certain quality standards. Listing in DOAJ is a requirement for the ScienceOpen free indexing program to assure good quality articles from an editorial standpoint. Furthermore, having DOAJ IDs also ease the indexing procedure significantly. With your articles registered in DOAJ, the only thing you have to do is to check there are no APC or other publication charges and to send ScienceOpen a list of the DOAJ ID-s for each article record and your content will be indexed in no time.

Continue reading “Guidelines for free indexing applicants”  

Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel: “The established data base will continuously grow and extend, integrating an ever increasing number of open access studies.”

In line with the recent beetle boom on ScienceOpen, a researcher led collection on Coleoptera has been created on ScienceOpen.  In the following interview founder and editor of the collection, Rolf Georg Beutel (Professor of Zoology at the Institut für Spezielle Zoologie und Evolutionsbiologie, Jena) will share a little background and gives us an insight on how it works in practice, how such thematic collections serve research communities. And of course, he will also reveal why beetles are cool.

Hi Rolf, thank you for joining. Can you first tell us a bit about your research background, and how you originally got interested in Entomology? Why did you choose to study Coleoptera?

I must admit that in contrast to many other entomologists I was not interested in insects at all as a child or later as a student of Zoology at the University of Tübingen. I was clearly inspired by an eccentric but outstanding academic teacher, Dr. G. Mickoleit, who suggested I should investigate the head and mouthparts of a very small and very cryptic beetle larva. Even though I had a hard time with my first objects of study, I obviously got hooked and continued studying beetles and other insects for the rest of my scientific career.

Why did you decide to build a ScienceOpen Collection on Coleoptera?

Dr. Stephanie Dawson, whom I have known for more than 10 years, mainly in the context of the Handbook of Zoology series, suggested to me to establish this ScienceOpen collection on beetles. My positive previous experience with her expertise and also with ScienceOpen was confirmed by the impressively efficient process of building and presenting this collection.

Coleoptera is one of the first automatically synchronized collections on ScienceOpen. What were the main principles of building the collection and how it develops?

Coleoptera is an immensely diverse and popular group. The intention was to go beyond the traditional fields of taxonomy and morphology, even though these have certainly their merits and are still very important in different contexts. The established data base will continuously grow and extend, integrating an ever increasing number of open access studies.

Do you have favourite pieces or lines of research in the collection that you find especially relevant to this field? 

Primarily I consider myself as a systematist, and therefore I am interested in articles on phylogeny and classification in the first place. Even though many publications in these fields are older and not available as electronic files (or not covered by open access), the new collection already provides an impressive number of relevant studies and will grow with an accelerated rate in the future.

As an evolutionary biologist dealing with beetles among other groups of insects, I appreciate that the data base covers multiple lines of research, as for instance genetics or physiology. This has the potential for reciprocal stimulation of researchers of Coleoptera, beyond the basic disciplines like systematics and taxonomy. These are indispensable tools in biodiversity research and provide an essential reference system for studies in other fields. Connected with topics like for instance the physiological and genetic backgrounds of feeding habits or reproductive biology, evolutionary biology of Coleoptera is getting really exciting. The very rapidly growing molecular data in the “age on phylogenomics” open fascinating perspectives in the investigation of beetles and other organisms.

In which ways your research community benefits from the collection?

The easy accessibility of open access articles on beetles is an obvious advantage of this collection.

Finally, tell us about what is the coolest thing in studying entomology?

Beetles are often very beautiful insects and have attracted attention very early, for instance as religious symbol (Scarabaeus sacer) or material for jewellery, or also simply as food source.  Among amateur collectors, who made valuable contributions over the last centuries, only butterflies enjoy a comparable popularity. Talking about what is cool about Coleoptera, it is hard to avoid a statement made by the geneticist and evolutionary biologist J.B.S. Haldane, who allegedly said that God had an “inordinate fondness of beetles”. This mainly refers to the incredible diversity of the group, which presently comprises approximately 380.000 described species, about one-third  of all known organisms. The question why Coleoptera was much more successful (in terms of species numbers) than other groups is an intriguing question in itself for evolutionary biologists. Aside from this, beetles are an integrative part of nearly all terrestrial and limnic habitats. Many species are important plant pests but others beneficial as natural enemies of harmful species.  What fascinates me most is that after centuries of research crucial phylogenetic issues are still unsolved, like for instance the interrelationships of the 4 extant suborders (“it is the glory of God to conceal things….”). Presently exponentially growing molecular data sets and improved analytical approaches (www.1KITE.org) provide new powerful tools to resolve these issues. This is definitely “cool” and exciting!

Thank you, Rolf, it’s been great getting your insight!

(Credit: U.Schmidt, Flickr. CC BY 2.0)

Got inspired? You can create your own thematic collection by following these steps.

 

Beetle boom on ScienceOpen: recent additions from the field of entomology

(Credit: Christopher Marley, Pinterest)

Insects are everywhere. The fact that their diversity surpasses any other group of organisms is an amazing evolutionary success story, and they have a significant impact on the environment and therefore upon our own lives. Our recent additions from the field of entomology open up new perspectives to the study of these colourful creatures. They help us to develop a better understanding on the role insects play within a range of environments, and the solutions they can provide to everyday  and global problems.

More specifically, they tell us about:

  • The significance of their contribution to biodiversity and its critical role in human culture
  • The role that insects play within a given environment
  • The kinds of ecological interactions with humans and other lifeforms on earth and the ways people benefit from sharing their life space with insects
  • Their positions in food webs
  • Their morphology, evolution, and biomechanics
  • The challenges in the description and classification of this diverse group of animals

Continue reading “Beetle boom on ScienceOpen: recent additions from the field of entomology”  

In:  Announcements  

Archaeology in context

Straight from the excavations an assembly of archaeological journals have arrived to ScienceOpen today as a result of our new partnership with Equinox, an independent academic publisher of books and journals in Social Sciences and Humanities.

Although these journals thematise different subfields, areas and periods, a common denominator in their approaches is that they all take an anthropological view of archaeology. Their aim is to extract meaning structures from the material remains of ancient cultures in order to reconstruct past lifeways and rituals in everyday life, document knowledge production, and to explain changes in human societies through time in general. Such thick descriptions are achieved through the interpretation of anthropological phenomena in multiple contexts – be it parallelisms with another ancient culture, large(r)-scale investigations of the same tendencies, global warming or theoretical frameworks like gender studies – rather than in their isolation.

One source of the diversity in contexts comes from the multidisciplinary character of the journals. Contributions have been submitted from around the world and they encompass disciplinary perspectives from art, architecture, sociology, urban studies, cultural studies, design studies, history, human geography, media studies, museum studies, psychology, and technology studies. Are you interested urban development, arts, or ritual acts in ancient cultures or the frozen artefacts being conserved by ice patches? Below you can find the journals now indexed on our site, and a teaser from their selected articles. Take a peek!

Continue reading “Archaeology in context”  

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