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Author: Jon Tennant

In:  Announcements  

Boost your open citations with our new article request feature

Missing an article or citation from ScienceOpen, or want to add more of your own publications? Users can now request articles to be integrated into our database via their dashboard. These can be your own articles, or someone else’s – the choice is yours!

All we need are either a list of:

  • CrossRef DOIs
  • DOAJ IDs
  • PubMed IDs

Simply upload a file or copy and paste them in, click the button and away you go! We’ll send you a notification by email to let you know the status of each article. We’ll work our magic behind the scenes and integrate your selection as soon as is computationally possible.

Find this feature on your user dashboard.

Boost your citations

One of the great things about this new feature is that you can add a list of DOIs of articles that cite your own work. We provide a free and open citation network for each of our users, based on extracting citation data from peer reviewed publications. Thanks to initiatives like I4OC, it is becoming easier to provide enriched citation information like we do for researchers for free.

To find your Dashboard, click on the My ScienceOpen tab at the top!

By adding research that cites your work, we provide an easy and great way to make sure that your citation profile is complete! This isn’t gaming the system, it’s simply making it comprehensive and open. That’s important. Put this in the context of our recently launched author-metrics, and you’re on to a winning academic profile!

For collection editors

If you have a collection at ScienceOpen, you can specify that these records be automatically integrated into them. You can add these in bulk, with 100 DOIs per request for now. Personalising your collections and making them complete has never been easier! If you want to set up your own collection and try out these features, contact us here!

Integration and validation

By using the new ‘claim authorship’ feature, your articles will be directly integrated with your ScienceOpen profile and ORCID. This provides crucial cross-validation of your research history, a unique feature of ScienceOpen. If you’re adding you own article records, these will be available in your ‘Claim your articles’ section of the Dashboard, where you can easily add them to your profile.

Collecting and Connecting with ORCID!

We recognise that no research database is complete, and ScienceOpen is no exception. We work closely with publishers, ORCID, and platforms like PubMed to integrate new content on a daily basis. But we can’t pick up everything, and that’s where you come in!

By adding personalised content, you help us to fill in the blank spots in our database. This helps to enrich our network by putting this content into our semantically linked network.  We are currently only indexing research articles and not book chapters, proceedings or other content types.

So pop over to your dashboard, try it out, and let us know what you think!

In:  Collections  

Showcasing our favourite ScienceOpen collections

In the last few months at ScienceOpen, we have rolled out an incredible number of new features for our users. Now, we feel it is time to take stock, and reflect on how you are all using them to help enhance your research. We want to recognise some of the valuable work from the global research community in helping to make science more open!

There are now 177 excellent research collections published on ScienceOpen, each with our pretty slick new collection statistics. With this, we want to highlight just a few of the latest collections that have really caught our eye. Here, the collection editors have each done exceptional work in curating and promoting research to create a valuable resource for their communities.

Take a dive into one of the latest collections all about the world of sponges!

Take your pick!

  • Good practices in cognitive neuroscience and science communication – Cyril Pernet and Jonathan Peelle
    • For researchers, scientific integrity and communication have never been more important. This collection contains some excellent articles on statistics and data visualisation and data and code sharing.
  • Small-angle X-ray scattering: Recent – Brian Pauw
    • Part of the new SAXS collection series, this automatically updates with the most recent publications in the field. A fantastic educational resource for Chemistry students.
  • Research paper of the future – Gail Clement and Plato Smith
    • Papers relating to new models and prototypes of the future research article. Great for those interested in scholarly communication!
  • Wikipedia Quality – Egon Willighagen
    • How much do you trust the information in Wikipedia? This collection has some research to illuminate this for you!
  • Paleontology of Mongolia – Andrew Farke
    • Mongolia is a treasure trove of fossils for palaeontologists. Learn about what they’ve discovered here!
  • Pneumonia, sex, and the environment – Patricia Silveyra (read her Editorial here!)
    • Articles describing the link between air pollution, pneumonia, and the differences between male and female individuals.
  • Tics – Kevin Black
    • The science behind tic disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome.
  • Higher order chromatin architecture – Wolf Gebhardt
    • Delving into our understanding of the function and structure of higher order chromatin.
Collection statistics looking great here!

 

Continue reading “Showcasing our favourite ScienceOpen collections”  

In:  About SO  

Making your science work for society

Recently, we announced new features enabling authors to add non-specialist summaries to their articles indexed on ScienceOpen. We believe that having authors add these to their articles helps to make them more accessible to a wider audience, increase their reach. It makes a clear statement that they care about the societal impact of their research.

Value added!

Well, clearly you are all seeing the value in these features too! We’ve already had over 170 great authors writing non-specialist summaries since making the announcement. By integrating this into our research engine, we are seeing those articles gaining a huge boost in popularity! These authors have also added extra keywords and thumbnails to their articles to make them more visible and discoverable on ScienceOpen.

Great author summary of important groundwater research in Indonesia (Source)

Making an impact in the open

We are extremely happy to see authors keen to make their work more accessible. The great thing about adding these summaries is that they are valuable whether or not the articles are published Open Access.

Some of our favourites so far are:

Continue reading “Making your science work for society”  

In:  Other  

ScienceOpen Collecting and Connecting with ORCID

ORCID have recognised the discovery and networking platform ScienceOpen for leadership in integrating their services as part of their Collect and Connect program.

Under ORCID’s mantra of “Enter once, reuse often”, Collect and Connect is designed for member organizations to collect, display, connect and synchronize data between research information systems. This was developed to streamline the integration process across a range of research systems, funders, and publishers.

ORCID has been at the foundation of ScienceOpen since inception, enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are delighted to be among the first recognized by ORCID as part of their Collect and Connect Program. ORCID has been essential to our development, and together we will continue to build a robust scholarly infrastructure for all stakeholders.”

ScienceOpen features alongside other leaders, including eLife, Overleaf, and Editorial Manager, all committed to creating valid assertions about scholarly connectivity in a reliable, trustworthy, and transparent way.

Laure Haak, Executive Director of ORCID, said “ScienceOpen has been a huge supporter of ORCID – both by demonstrating in practice how iDs enable profile platforms and also through your incredible researcher engagement activities.  Our badges are a small but important official acknowledgement for your actions. Thank you for your leadership in the open research community!”

In:  Announcements  

ScienceOpen supports the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC)

Today, the I4OC (Initiative for Open Citations) announced new supporting publishers joining to release reference data for more than 16 million articles. This is a major step forward as publishers such as Emerald, the American Physical Society, SciELO and De Gruyter team up with Springer/Nature, Wiley, Sage and many more to unlock the powerful information encoded in citation networks.

ScienceOpen joins the growing list of stakeholders who support the I4OC initiative, alongside OASPA (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association), Jisc, and the LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries).

You can find all references contained within any article record on ScienceOpen

What does ScienceOpen have to do with the I4OC?

The analysis of citation data is at the core of what we do at ScienceOpen. Citations trace academic networks, describe research genealogies, and uncover ideas. They enable a great range of functions dependent on the connections and context that they reveal to us.

There are several ways in which we use citation data at ScienceOpen:

  1. To sort publications by citation numbers. There are nearly always too many papers to read through them all. So every search result list on ScienceOpen can be filtered and sorted by citation numbers to find relevant articles. This powerful filter is supplemented by Altmetric score, usage, date, and more.
  2. To sort reference lists by citation numbers. The reference list of a paper is an important discovery tool for researchers, but often with 50-100 references. The sort and search tools at ScienceOpen allow both a quick overview and in depth searching within the reference section – now for many more papers with the I4OC initiative!
  3. To increase visibility of open content. If your article cites 50 papers, there will be 50 more article pages on ScienceOpen that point back to your original paper. The increased linkage helps to define networks of similarity that show the right paper to the user searching for information.
  4. To provide citation information for any author on our platform. Integrate your ORCID and claim your publications today, and you can track your citations through time.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen supports the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC)”  

In:  About SO  

ScienceOpen indexing for institutions

At ScienceOpen, we offer a range of next-generation indexing services. This includes a package especially for institutes, to help them gain the maximum visibility and re-use of the articles their researchers publish.

If you’d like to know more, see this presentation from our co-founder, Prof. Alexander Grossmann, below.

Key features

  • Making your institution’s research more visible.
  • Tracking your institution’s research output.
  • Letting your researchers track usage of their own work.
  • Helping others find your content through our similar search features.
  • Extract and export usage information.
  • Author profiles and statistics all connected to a researcher’s ORCID profile.
All of this is free for all authors and users! To learn more, contact us here.
In:  Other  

Tracking the impact of your collections

One of the greatest features we have at ScienceOpen are collections. These are thematic groupings of published articles and pre-prints, managed by a collection editor. Core features include:

Recently, we released our professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen. Built into our search and discovery platform, MyScienceOpen is about developing your research profile in the open, increasing the impact of your research, and quantifying that effect.

Continue reading “Tracking the impact of your collections”  

In:  Collections  

We need to get informed about Climate Change

Climate change needs open science

We are in the midst of a global information and knowledge crisis. Access to scientific research has never been more important to provide the basis for debates on critical issues such as climate change, global health, and renewable energies.

At ScienceOpen, we want to play our part here. We have built an automatically updating research collection on climate change for anyone and everyone. It has almost 7,500 research articles, each of which are Open Access. This means they are freely available for anyone to read, re-use, and share without restriction!

Collection statistics – growing every day!

The collection already has 80,000 views, demonstrating the power of our collections features, and joins more than 150 others so far on ScienceOpen!

Continue reading “We need to get informed about Climate Change”  

In:  About SO  

Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

Last week, we unveiled MyScienceOpen, our new professional networking platform for researchers. MySciencOpen comes with a whole cadre of new features that combine the functionality of a range of existing social platforms, and bring them directly to you all in one place. You get access to all of this at the click of a button through our ORCID integration. Free, legal, and easy!

One of the main new features we’ve added is the ability for authors to upload non-specialist summaries to their articles. This is great for increasing the visibility and impact of your research at the point of discovery.

But how can you track this increased impact? Aha, well, we thought of that. Every user at ScienceOpen now has a whole suite of brand new metrics that track how their content is being re-used across ScienceOpen.

Quantifying your context

Everyone can see the tab for your content in context. These show how many total ‘nodes’ or connections your work forms in the context of the ScienceOpen platform. We show:

  • Your total number of publications
  • Your total number of different journals published in
  • How many co-authors you’ve published with
  • How many articles you’ve referenced
  • How many articles in our database have cited you
Exhibit 1

Continue reading “Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen

Last week, we were pleased to announce the launch of our new professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen.

Fully integrated into our article archive of 32 million article records, and combined with our extensive researcher toolkit, MyScienceOpen is the only research networking platform you will ever need!

Now, this is not just another researcher profile. This is the researcher profile. Why have one profile for your research usage, another for you article records, another for your science communication activities, another to record your peer reviews, another for searching for research, and another for tracking citations and Altmetrics? It’s exhausting!

MyScienceOpen brings you all of these features into one platform. We make this even easier by leveraging the power of ORCID to make integration, tracking, and activation of your research one seamless process. All it takes is the click of a button!

Continue reading “Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen”