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Author: Jon Tennant

In:  Announcements  

ScienceOpen supports the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC)

Today, the I4OC (Initiative for Open Citations) announced new supporting publishers joining to release reference data for more than 16 million articles. This is a major step forward as publishers such as Emerald, the American Physical Society, SciELO and De Gruyter team up with Springer/Nature, Wiley, Sage and many more to unlock the powerful information encoded in citation networks.

ScienceOpen joins the growing list of stakeholders who support the I4OC initiative, alongside OASPA (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association), Jisc, and the LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries).

You can find all references contained within any article record on ScienceOpen

What does ScienceOpen have to do with the I4OC?

The analysis of citation data is at the core of what we do at ScienceOpen. Citations trace academic networks, describe research genealogies, and uncover ideas. They enable a great range of functions dependent on the connections and context that they reveal to us.

There are several ways in which we use citation data at ScienceOpen:

  1. To sort publications by citation numbers. There are nearly always too many papers to read through them all. So every search result list on ScienceOpen can be filtered and sorted by citation numbers to find relevant articles. This powerful filter is supplemented by Altmetric score, usage, date, and more.
  2. To sort reference lists by citation numbers. The reference list of a paper is an important discovery tool for researchers, but often with 50-100 references. The sort and search tools at ScienceOpen allow both a quick overview and in depth searching within the reference section – now for many more papers with the I4OC initiative!
  3. To increase visibility of open content. If your article cites 50 papers, there will be 50 more article pages on ScienceOpen that point back to your original paper. The increased linkage helps to define networks of similarity that show the right paper to the user searching for information.
  4. To provide citation information for any author on our platform. Integrate your ORCID and claim your publications today, and you can track your citations through time.

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In:  About SO  

ScienceOpen indexing for institutions

At ScienceOpen, we offer a range of next-generation indexing services. This includes a package especially for institutes, to help them gain the maximum visibility and re-use of the articles their researchers publish.

If you’d like to know more, see this presentation from our co-founder, Prof. Alexander Grossmann, below.

Key features

  • Making your institution’s research more visible.
  • Tracking your institution’s research output.
  • Letting your researchers track usage of their own work.
  • Helping others find your content through our similar search features.
  • Extract and export usage information.
  • Author profiles and statistics all connected to a researcher’s ORCID profile.
All of this is free for all authors and users! To learn more, contact us here.
In:  Other  

Tracking the impact of your collections

One of the greatest features we have at ScienceOpen are collections. These are thematic groupings of published articles and pre-prints, managed by a collection editor. Core features include:

Recently, we released our professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen. Built into our search and discovery platform, MyScienceOpen is about developing your research profile in the open, increasing the impact of your research, and quantifying that effect.

Continue reading “Tracking the impact of your collections”  

In:  Collections  

We need to get informed about Climate Change

Climate change needs open science

We are in the midst of a global information and knowledge crisis. Access to scientific research has never been more important to provide the basis for debates on critical issues such as climate change, global health, and renewable energies.

At ScienceOpen, we want to play our part here. We have built an automatically updating research collection on climate change for anyone and everyone. It has almost 7,500 research articles, each of which are Open Access. This means they are freely available for anyone to read, re-use, and share without restriction!

Collection statistics – growing every day!

The collection already has 80,000 views, demonstrating the power of our collections features, and joins more than 150 others so far on ScienceOpen!

Continue reading “We need to get informed about Climate Change”  

In:  About SO  

Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

Last week, we unveiled MyScienceOpen, our new professional networking platform for researchers. MySciencOpen comes with a whole cadre of new features that combine the functionality of a range of existing social platforms, and bring them directly to you all in one place. You get access to all of this at the click of a button through our ORCID integration. Free, legal, and easy!

One of the main new features we’ve added is the ability for authors to upload non-specialist summaries to their articles. This is great for increasing the visibility and impact of your research at the point of discovery.

But how can you track this increased impact? Aha, well, we thought of that. Every user at ScienceOpen now has a whole suite of brand new metrics that track how their content is being re-used across ScienceOpen.

Quantifying your context

Everyone can see the tab for your content in context. These show how many total ‘nodes’ or connections your work forms in the context of the ScienceOpen platform. We show:

  • Your total number of publications
  • Your total number of different journals published in
  • How many co-authors you’ve published with
  • How many articles you’ve referenced
  • How many articles in our database have cited you
Exhibit 1

Continue reading “Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen

Last week, we were pleased to announce the launch of our new professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen.

Fully integrated into our article archive of 32 million article records, and combined with our extensive researcher toolkit, MyScienceOpen is the only research networking platform you will ever need!

Now, this is not just another researcher profile. This is the researcher profile. Why have one profile for your research usage, another for you article records, another for your science communication activities, another to record your peer reviews, another for searching for research, and another for tracking citations and Altmetrics? It’s exhausting!

MyScienceOpen brings you all of these features into one platform. We make this even easier by leveraging the power of ORCID to make integration, tracking, and activation of your research one seamless process. All it takes is the click of a button!

Continue reading “Enhanced article impact with MyScienceOpen”  

In:  Announcements  

MyScienceOpen: The only networking platform you’ll ever need

Today, we are happy to announce our launch of MyScienceOpen, the professional networking platform designed for a modern research environment.

Since 2013, ScienceOpen has been leading innovation in advanced search and discovery, open peer review, and content management. Now, by leveraging the power of ORCID, we bring you our latest service for helping researchers to make an impact in the open.

MyScienceOpen is an integrated profile where academics can visualize their research impact through enhanced author-level metrics. Key new features include:

  • Interactive visualizations of an author’s readers, citations, and Altmetric scores for all their publications through time;
  • Addition of non-specialist article summaries, disciplines, keywords, and images to their article records;
  • Extraction of articles as RIS, BibTex and Endnote citation metadata for your reference managers;
  • Enhanced statistics for collection Editors to track usage.
New features to enhance your article visibility!

Making an impact in a research discovery ecosystem

We designed these new features for you to make an increased impact, and keep track as your research progresses. All of this is provided to you within the context of a discovery environment of more than 31 million article records. It just makes sense to have these profile and article enhancement features integrated into an ecosystem where people are actually discovering and re-using research. And for free, of course.

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In:  Peer Review  
Increasing academic support for Open Peer Review

Increasing academic support for Open Peer Review

‘Open research’ isn’t just about sharing resources like data, code, and papers, although this is a big part of it. One big, and often under-appreciated aspect of it is about making research accessible, inclusive, and participatory. A major principle driving this is leveraging transparency to bring processes and factors that are currently hidden into public view.

One area of research and scholarly communication where the debate is still very much ongoing for this is for peer review – our system of validation and gatekeeping to the vast archives of public knowledge.

OpenAIRE have released an important new survey and analysis on attitudes and experiences towards ‘Open Peer Review’ (OPR), based on more than 3000 respondents (full data available here to play with). This is important, as OPR is all about the principles above – making the process transparent, collaborative, inclusive, and in the end, better!

Below, we discuss some of the major findings of the survey, and how we at ScienceOpen fit into the bigger picture of Open Peer Review.

The future is Open

The main result of the survey is that the majority (60.3%) of respondents are in favour of OPR becoming a mainstream scholarly practice, particularly regarding open interaction, open reports and final-version commenting. Part of this is due to the relatively lower satisfaction scores reported, with just 56.4% of respondents being satisfied with traditional closed peer review, and 20.6% being dissatisfied – a much lower gap than all previous reports. From the survey, more than three quarters of respondents had previously engaged with OPR either as an author, reviewer, or editor. This suggests that OPR, in one form or another, is already probably more common practice than we might think.

Interestingly, this development is similar to what we saw with other aspects of ‘open science’ such as open access and open data – there is debate, experimentation, variable implementation, and finally they start to become accepted as the norm as policies, practices, and cultures adapt. The survey also showed that 88.2% of respondents were in favour of Open Access to publications, a much higher value than several years ago. It also found that support for OPR is correlated with support for Open Data and Open Access, which is perhaps not surprising, although conversations regarding OPR are still in their relative infancy.

This suggests that as debates around OPR mature, we are likely to see an increase in the uptake and support of it, as with other areas of ‘Open’. Indeed, the survey also found a difference in generational support for OPR, with younger generations favouring it more over more-established researchers. As it is these generations who will inherit and govern the system in the future, it is more likely to have the characteristics that they favour.

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In:  Peer Review  

Defining Open Peer Review at ScienceOpen

Recently, our colleagues at OpenAIRE have published a systematic review of ‘Open Peer Review’ (OPR). As part of this, they defined seven consistent traits of OPR, which we thought sounded like a remarkably good opportunity to help clarify how peer review works at ScienceOpen.

At ScienceOpen, we have over 31 million article records all available for public, post-publication peer review (PPPR), more than 3 million of which are full-text Open Access. This functionality is a response to increasing calls for continuous moderation of the published research literature, a consistent questioning of the functionality of the traditional peer review model (some examples in this post), and an increasing recognition that scientific discourse does not stop at the ‘event’ point of publication for any research article.

Peer Review at ScienceOpen – A brief summary

Open participation

At ScienceOpen, we invite the whole scientific community to contribute to the review process, should they wish to. The only requirement is that the person has to be registered at ORCID and have at least five publications assigned to their ORCID account to write a review (Scientific Members and Experts). If you do not satisfy these requirements and wish to perform a peer review at ScienceOpen, please contact us and we will make an exception for you.

Users with at least one publication assigned to their ORCID account are able to comment on a paper (Members). Please refer to our User categories for further details.

We also encourage users to use our ‘Invite to review’ function (see below), which is available on more than 31 million article records. We know that editorial control will always be a critical aspect of any open peer review system, including PPPR, and therefore encourage collection Editors to solicit peer reviews for articles within their collections.

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Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

This year in our Open Science Stars series, we’ve heard from researchers in Europe and Asia and their experiences of the publishing world, as well as from funders like the Gates Foundation. Today, we’ve interviewed Jonathan Peelle, a cognitive psychologist working in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University in Saint Louis. Jonathan recently built a collection on Neuroimaging Methods (ways to look inside your brain..), at ScienceOpen, so we decided it would be nice to turn the tables and pick his brain instead to learn about his research background and interests in open science!

  1. Hi Jonathan! Thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about your research interests?

My research is focused on the neuroscience of language processing, and how sensory and cognitive systems interact to enable communication. We are interested in questions like:

  • How can we understand people we’ve never heard before?
  • Why is having a conversation in noise harder for some people than for others?
  • How similar is brain activity across a group of people?

My lab spends a lot of time studying people with hearing loss and cochlear implants because of the profound effects these have on sensory processing. We rely on converging evidence from behavioral studies, structural MRI, and functional neuroimaging.

MRI scan of human head in a patient with benign familial macrocephaly (Source)

Continue reading “Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle”