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In:  Collections  

New Global Health Article Collection from GHNGN now published – #review4GH!

ScienceOpen, the research and Open Access publishing network are delighted to announce that, together with partners The Global Health Next Generation Network (GHNGN) – a multidisciplinary group that strengthens the voice of students and young professionals in this field and encourages them to share scientific knowledge, today we have published a new Global Health article collection.

The objective of this Collection, is to encourage discussion on different topics in this field such as female genital mutilation, primary care in developing states and Epidemiology in Latin America and the Carribean.  We want to encourage the global health community to start an interactive conversation around this original and previously published research by participating in Post-Publication Peer Review (PPPR) which is a key part of the ScienceOpen service. Here’s a short video that explains how.

We have a meme and hashtags “#review4GH” and “#ScienceOpen4GH” to encourage others to participate in the online dialogue. The topics covered are complex and difficult but as a group that represents the future leaders of tomorrow’s global health world, the GHNGN are using social media to encourage their membership and beyond, to take part.

reviewit

The publication of this Collection is timely given their imminent 2nd International Conference in Barcelona on June 25th. They will be sharing their experiences of working with ScienceOpen on this Collection with those attending and encouraging them to add their articles to it so the Collection continues to live and grow. gh

The reason that they chose to forge a closer relationship with ScienceOpen is because of our active support of Earlier Career Researchers and the fact that we conveniently combine 3 services on one platform namely:

  1. Gold Open Access (OA) publishing – articles that are freely available to read and re-use
  2. Non-Anonymous Post-Publication Peer Review – for the most transparent feedback
  3. OA content aggregation – making it easier to browse and re-use the literature, regardless of publisher

For further information on this Collection please email Joceline Kranenburg, Partnership coordinator, GHNGN.

In:  Collections  

Update for the growing number of Collection Editors – spiffy new features!

before
Before and after, Jennifer Donley, Flickr, CC-BY

At ScienceOpen, we’re pretty pleased with how Collections, which uniquely feature articles from multiple OA publishers chosen by a researcher based on their interests, are shaping up.

We have published eight so far and many more are in the works. Thanks to all of you who took the plunge and got involved. Leading by example is so important if we are to bring real and lasting change to scientific communication.

Here are a few enhancements to make life as a Collection Editor that bit easier. Naturally you can still use our search engine (powered by elastic, not literally!) of over 1.5 million OA articles to find relevant content and add it to the Collection. Although now the process of selecting what goes into your Collection has been improved by the addition of Altmetrics to all articles. In terms of giving you more control, we’ve also introduced a drag and drop feature so that you can arrange your article choices in whatever order you like.

In terms of the more fun parts of being a Collection Editor, you can still visually customize the look and feel of your Collection and publish an accompanying Editorial with DOI (free) to explain why you published it and what behaviors you hope to encourage by demonstrating change to your peers. For those of you who go to the lengths of adding comments to each article with a note of the reasons why you chose it, we’ve rewarded that effort by making the comments immediately visible on your Collection page and others can reply to you right there too.

Co-founder Alexander Grossmann’s Collection, entitled “Perspectives in Scholarly Publishing” (partially shown below), showcases these spiffy new features really well. As does the International Union of Crystallography Collection which also has some rockin Altmetrics!

AGC

And as a final touch to the all important effort:reward factor (a little ego boost if you will, when things go right anyways!), your Collection Statistics are also visible. Alex is doing quite nicely on this front!

AGCC

Although we’re delighted at the number of Collection Editors who have stepped up, we welcome more. If you want to join us, then please review this page and send us an email.

As ever, a shout-out to our Boston based dev team for helping Collections to flourish.

 

New Collection from the International Union of Crystallography – happy first birthday IUCrJ!

Image credit: A colorized two-dimensional XRD pattern, IUCrJ, CC-BY
Image credit: A colorized two-dimensional XRD pattern, IUCrJ, CC-BY

Here at ScienceOpen we’re a gold Open Access (OA) publisher, a peer review reformer and a content aggregator – our platform features 1.5 million articles sourced from PubMed Central, ArXiv and ScienceOpen.

In recognition of the London Book Fair 2015 and the associated spotlight this week on all matters publishing related, we’re highlighting two new Open Access (OA) article Collections. A top scientific union and a major medical publisher are using our platform to give their OA content increased visibility and facilitate Post-Publication Peer Review.

Jonathan Agbenyega, a Scientific Member of ScienceOpen and Business Development Manager at the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr), used our new Collection tool to select articles from their Open Access Journal, IUCrJ, to celebrate its first year.

Building this Collection on our platform, allows the IUCr, a leading non-profit International Scientific Union, to show its broad ranging content which is of interest to researchers from different disciplines that use results obtained from diffraction methods.

These articles are now available for Post-Publication Peer Review (PPPR), by experts with 5 publications on their ORCID, as are all the articles aggregated on our site. Every review receives a DOI so each contribution can be found and cited.

Not only is this content open for additional discussion after publication it can also be combined with other articles to form new Collections.

Jonathan commented, “I was delighted to bring together a collection of our leading papers from our new fully open-access journal IUCrJ and showcase them in a collection on the ScienceOpen platform. The additional visibility and opportunity to interact with the content which comes with this new portal will be an important step forward for all chemists, biologists and physicists working in the area of structure determination.”

Researchers, Societies or Publishers who want to create their own Collection are welcome to apply for the role of Community Editor (which entitles them to 2 free ScienceOpen articles) and then they, like Jonathan, can pick and choose articles from multiple publishers and combine them, for whatever reason they wish.

Welcome to the next wave of Open Access!

A warm ScienceOpen welcome to two new journals from top German medical publisher, Thieme

Image credit: Stonetown hat stall by Gail Hampshire, Flickr, CC BY
Image credit: Stonetown hat stall by Gail Hampshire, Flickr, CC BYHere at ScienceOpen we wear a few different hats! We’re a gold Open Access (OA) publisher, a peer review reformer and a content aggregator.

Here at ScienceOpen we wear a few different hats! We’re a gold Open Access (OA) publisher, a peer review reformer and a content aggregator.

This week, with the London Book Fair 2015 about to start, we are celebrating publishers and societies by profiling the innovative ways that they are using our platform!

It gives us great pleasure to report how a top scientific union and a major medical publisher (see below) are now using our platform to give their OA content increased visibility and facilitate scientific discussion.

With 1.5 million OA articles and a high performance search engine on ScienceOpen, users can slice and dice the content as they like. And often that selection criteria may be a trusted publisher or innovative journal. ScienceOpen is making that easy! With ScienceOpen Collections we’re able to highlight the articles of publishers and societies. Other innovative ways to use the Collection Tool  are discussed in this blog post.

For the first time, mirror versions of two new OA journals – the American Journal of Perinatology Reports and The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Reports (partners to the American Journal of Perinatology and The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon) – have been re-created on our platform.  This allows them to be fully integrated into the scientific conversation. Both journals are published by Thieme, an award-winning international medical and science publisher.

You can find the American Journal of Perinatology Reports and The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Report Collections on ScienceOpen under the publisher Thieme. These medical case reports are now available for commenting, sharing, and Post-Publication Peer Review (PPPR), by experts with 5 publications on their ORCID, as are all the articles aggregated on our site. The great thing: every review receives a CrossRef DOI so each contribution can be found and cited. We believe that this is a fantastic way to credit the important work of reviewers, too!

ScienceOpen CEO Stephanie Dawson, presented this concept at the Scientific Publishing Innovation Day organized by the Frankfurter Buchmesse in London on April 13th, just before the London Book Fair.

New Cancer Immunotherapy Collection – features content from multiple OA publishers

Image credit: Shells by artvintage1800s, Flickr, CC BY
Image credit: Shells by artvintage1800s, Flickr, CC BY

Here’s something a bit different! A collection of articles on Cancer Immunotherapy from multiple OA publishers which features work from:

BioMed Central

  • Journal of Translational Medicine
  • Journal for the Immunotherapy of Cancer
  • Molecular Cancer
  • Systems Biology

Hindawi

  • The Scientific World Journal

Nature Publishing Group

  • Frontiers in Immunology
  • Frontiers in Pharmacology

PLOS

  • PLOS ONE

Spandidos Publications

  • International Journal of Oncology
  • Oncology Reports

The largest number of articles come from PLOS ONE (not surprisingly, it’s the world’s largest journal) and BioMed Central. If you stop and think about it, it’s good to unite these publishers around content, that’s the true spirit of Open Access.

As some of you may have noticed, we have a different take on Collections here at ScienceOpen and don’t see why all the articles have to come from the same publisher as is usually the case. Since we’ve also aggregated nearly 1.5 million OA articles, we decided to build a little “collection widget”, establish a new role of “Community Editor” (comes with a modest stipend) and have researchers themselves curate a collection or “mini-journal” in their discipline.

In this way, we hope it will become more obvious which disciplines or niche sub-fields are still short on OA content, Community Editors are also empowered to call for more submissions. In topics where there is already an abundance of OA articles, the art form becomes finding ways to surface the best content and who better to curate it than an expert researcher (rather than a professional editor).

As always, getting a new concept off the ground is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration. To demonstrate how Collections work, we asked our Consulting Editor Richard Gallagher to pick a topic, choose some articles (and comment on his top 10 as to why he chose them), write an editorial and finally use the widget to pull it all together.

The result of his endeavors is the ScienceOpen Collection on Cancer Immunotherapy. Then we decided to interview Richard so that he could share his experiences and encourage others to apply for the role of Community Editor themselves (to those who have already stepped up, thanks for participating):

Q. What’s your scientific/professional background and how did it help you select these articles

A. I am a mucosal immunologist if I go back far enough. I’ve been involved in scientific editing for over 20 years and always had a more than passing interest in immunotherapy for cancer: it presents a challenge on so many levels, but the potential is enormous.

Q. What were your criteria for article selection?

A. Simply put, I looked for research that could have a substantial impact on the treatment of cancer, however far from application it may currently be. The fact that among the articles there are new therapies, combinations of therapies, new techniques for cell preparation and better approaches to monitoring patient responses shows the breadth of progress in the field.

Q. What was the hardest part of curating this collection? 

A. Culling very good research! Like any list of “the most exciting research” is it subjective. I have provided notes as to why I selected each article for reference.

Q. What was the easiest part of curating this collection?

A. Since all of the papers have all undergone peer review of one sort or another, they were generally in very good shape

Q. What skills are required to successfully curate a collection?

A. Not so much a skill but an interest in the field in broad terms is a must. An ability to briefly summarize the significance of complex findings is required too.

Q. How long did it take you to curate this collection?

A. I did it over a six week period, spending maybe 10 hours per week. This is the first Collection that I had done (or in fact anyone had done!) for ScienceOpen so that time involved thinking about the criteria for selection and how the summaries should be handled, as well as selecting the articles.

Q. What types of people would be most suitable for the role of “Community Editor”?

A. Scientists who love to read and think widely about their subject. I remember always being drawn to journal clubs and departmental presentations, I got real enjoyment out of learning something new and digging around in a wide range topics. The ideal curators or community editors could be PhD students or post-docs that like this aspect of the work. Perhaps two or three of them from different labs working together would be an interesting way of organizing the community team, some mentorship might also be helpful.

Q. What would you like to see happen as a result of this collection?

A. The collections need to be updated on a regular basis by the curators. This will produce a valuable resource for little time investment: no-one can stay current across a broad swathe of the literature and this will draw attention to the most interesting OA research being published. It would be terrific if these collections became starting points for discussions of particular articles and where the field is (or should be) headed. On a purely practical level, I would like to see others taking part in Post-Publication Peer Review of these articles and giving feedback on my selection criteria which I have provided for every article.

To apply for the role of Community Editor yourself or to apply on behalf of a team, simply email Sebastian Alers with your resume and a cover note.

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