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Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen

Unique

Peer review at ScienceOpen is a little different to what you might be used to.

Does the fact that a paper has been published, and therefore peer reviewed, mean that it is flawless? Does it mean that the conversation around that research should stop? We do not think so. The only reason there would ever be no value in doing post-publication evaluation would be if all published work were completely infallible. Which is clearly not the case. This is, after all, why we continue to do research and build upon the work of those before us!

Therefore, we enable post-publication peer review across 34 million article records, as a form of final-version commenting. It can also be performed on preprints from the arXiv. These are essentially treated as open, pre-review manuscripts. Users can organise these into collections, and manage peer review entirely themselves as a community process.

Managed

We have now added a new feature that enables any of our users to invite another researcher to perform peer review on our platform. This is in the same way that an Editor does for a journal, as part of a fully transparent process – the theme for Peer Review Week this year! The difference to the traditional process of peer review is that this is more democratic as it is open to anyone.

Step 1 – Find a paper of interest.

All article pages now have an ‘Invite to Review’ button. Click it, and you have 2 options.

  1. Search within the ScienceOpen userbase to see if the person you want to review already has a profile with us.
  2. Add an email, or list of emails, of who you want to invite to review, if they don’t already have a ScienceOpen profile.
Step 2 – Invite your colleagues to review!

That’s it. It’s that easy. This combines the editorial management of peer review with open participation. We enable this to make sure that the process is fair, but efficient. This means that anyone within your research community can contribute to the research process, should they wish to.

Continue reading “Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen”  

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ScienceOpen interview series: Prof. George Perry, world expert on Alzheimer’s Disease

Professor George Perry is the Dean of the College of Sciences at the University of Texas in San Antonio. He is recognised as a world expert in the field of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, we spoke with Prof. Perry about his research, including his new ScienceOpen collection.

(Source)

Hi Prof. Perry! You are recognised as one of the 100 top scientists in Neuroscience and Behaviour, and have incredibly amassed more than 1300 research publications to date! What’s the secret to your success?  

Persistence and focus on collecting and publishing highly useful data and insights.

Do you ever find it difficult maintaining your public profile with so many publications? How did you find the ORCID integration at ScienceOpen?

Maintaining numerous profiles as up-to-date requires constant monitoring. Linking datasets with ORCID does assist.

Your research focusses on the processes leading to neuronal damage. What have been your key discoveries to date?

Primarily, establishing oxidative stress in Alzheimer’s disease. Second, new insights regarding the cell biology of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your ScienceOpen collection is on alternative approaches to Alzheimer’s disease. What is the ‘alternative’ in this case, and why is this so important?

It is the alternative to the amyloid cascade, which dominates our field. The collection presents a biological view of Alzheimer’s disease.

What do you hope to achieve with your ScienceOpen collection? And how can we help you with this?

The collection provides a group of papers that illuminates an alternative to amyloid as the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.  I use it when communicating with others about weakness and alternatives, and to demonstrate that the amyloid cascade has been questioned for over two decades.

Thank you for your time, Prof. Perry. It has been great to learn from your insight and experience!

 

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ScienceOpen Collecting and Connecting with ORCID

ORCID have recognised the discovery and networking platform ScienceOpen for leadership in integrating their services as part of their Collect and Connect program.

Under ORCID’s mantra of “Enter once, reuse often”, Collect and Connect is designed for member organizations to collect, display, connect and synchronize data between research information systems. This was developed to streamline the integration process across a range of research systems, funders, and publishers.

ORCID has been at the foundation of ScienceOpen since inception, enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are delighted to be among the first recognized by ORCID as part of their Collect and Connect Program. ORCID has been essential to our development, and together we will continue to build a robust scholarly infrastructure for all stakeholders.”

ScienceOpen features alongside other leaders, including eLife, Overleaf, and Editorial Manager, all committed to creating valid assertions about scholarly connectivity in a reliable, trustworthy, and transparent way.

Laure Haak, Executive Director of ORCID, said “ScienceOpen has been a huge supporter of ORCID – both by demonstrating in practice how iDs enable profile platforms and also through your incredible researcher engagement activities.  Our badges are a small but important official acknowledgement for your actions. Thank you for your leadership in the open research community!”

It’s the summer of Open Access love!

There is an ever-growing number of small-scale Open Access journals and publishers. These are run largely by research communities, who manage to reach out from their local contexts to the global landscape of scholarly communication and became established international forums. At ScienceOpen, these are what we call true Open Access success stories!

Part of our mission is to contribute to these success stories by recognizing the great efforts behind high-quality OA journals with no APCs (article processing charges), and by offering them our next-generation indexing services for free.

The winners of our monthly free indexing competition benefit from increased visibility, usage and branding for their indexed content. By getting indexed on ScienceOpen, these journals:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize readership
  • Drive more usage to their journals
  • Integrate their content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of their content
  • Assess and contextualize the impact of the journals with the help of collection-level statistics

The winners of the June round are coming from the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS), and join a growing corpus of research from this field on ScienceOpen. All 3 journals enjoy the benefits of the ‘by researchers – for researchers’ publishing model which enables them to assess precisely the needs in their fields of research, set clear goals, and to adopt a critical voice without making compromises.

These journals are:

PublisherPsychOpen (operated by Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information)

Country of publisher: Germany

Europe’s Journal of Psychology is a free online quarterly peer-reviewed journal publishing original studies, research, critical contributions, interviews and book reviews written by and intended for psychologists worldwide. Although primarily targeted at a European audience, EJOP gladly hosts contributions from psychologists irrespective of their geographical location. The journal was conceived in such a manner as to be accessible to both young researchers and established professionals and also to a very large area of scientific psychological ‘genres’ and schools.

We asked Prof. Dr. Armin Günther, Managing Editor of PsychOpen, about why they chose to enter the competition. He said:

“At PsychOpen, the European Open Access Platform for Psychology, we are very happy to be among the winners of the monthly ScienceOpen free indexing competition! This will not only help us to increase the visibility of our journal(s) but it’s also a great encouragement for our work, pursuing a community based, non-profit approach in scholarly publishing.”

Europe's Journal of Psychology

Publisher: Faculty of Philosophy, Institute of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Skopje

Country of publisher: Republic of Macedonia

Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation (JSER) is a multidisciplinary peer reviewed international journal edited by the Institute of Special Education and Rehabilitation of the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje, Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism and Macedonian Association of Special Educators. Although it began as a local and specialized journal, it managed to develop into an international and scientific one and to attract a large number of authors from over 30 countries around the world.

The aim of the journal is to share and disseminate knowledge between all disciplines that work in the field of special education and rehabilitation. The subject matter is broad and includes findings from biological, educational, genetic, medical, psychiatric, psychological and sociological studies. It publishes ethical, philosophical, and legal contributions that increase knowledge on the prevention and treatment of disability, and/or inform public policy and practice. The articles are bilingual (Macedonian and English).

Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation

PublisherUniversity of Udine

Country of publisher: Italy

This journal seeks to disseminate research on modern languages and literatures with special emphasis on anglophone literatures and cultures. Their main aim is to foster critical resistance towards hegemonic and hierarchical models of culture, and positively promote, as viable alternatives, discourse practices of partnership and mutuality. Articles cover topics like “hybridisation” of languages and literatures, migrant writing, intercultural and transcultural identities and subjectivities, post-colonial studies or subaltern studies.

Le Simplegadi

Taking the ‘diamond’ way, all these journals prove that ‘gold’ Open Access is much more than APCs, and that you don’t need high costs to maintain high quality.

If you know free to publish Open Access journals you would like to see indexed on ScienceOpen, let us know. If you run one, participate in our competition today and get indexed on ScienceOpen for free! See our guidelines for indexing here.

 

 

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Tracking the impact of your collections

One of the greatest features we have at ScienceOpen are collections. These are thematic groupings of published articles and pre-prints, managed by a collection editor. Core features include:

Recently, we released our professional networking platform, MyScienceOpen. Built into our search and discovery platform, MyScienceOpen is about developing your research profile in the open, increasing the impact of your research, and quantifying that effect.

Continue reading “Tracking the impact of your collections”  

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ScienceOpen is marching for science!

This week, on Saturday, April 22nd (Earth Day) the global science-interested community is uniting to march for science across the world. Many of our members will be joining the March for Science in Washington DC and other cities around the world.

The March for Science is about the role that science plays in our everyday lives, but also about political activism for researchers, celebrating the diversity of research cultures, and making sure that policy developments are grounded in strong evidence.

You can follow the events live on Twitter at #MarchForScience

ScienceOpen will be part of the global march, and in five different locations! A more informed dialogue between scientists and citizens requires openness, transparency, and access to information – one of the key mission statements of ScienceOpen, and the reason we will be out marching in force.

CEO Stephanie Dawson will be marching in Berlin, Germany, with other members of our team there. Find her on Twitter and join them here!

Prof. Alexander Grossman, co-founder of ScienceOpen, will be taking to the streets in Leipzig, Germany. Get in touch here.

Tibor Tscheke, the other co-founder of ScienceOpen, will also be marching in Boston, USA! Contact him here.

Jon Tennant will be in Seattle, USA, joining the Science March as part of the Sage Bionetworks Assembly. Contact him here.

Erzsébet Toth-Czifra will be marching in Budapest, Hungary, too, and you can reach her here.

We welcome anyone and everyone to stand by our sides with the rest of the march, and together celebrate science as a global community!

In:  Other  

Innovative new features launched at ScienceOpen

For formal press release, see our Press Room and STM Publishing News.

ScienceOpen has launched a suite of powerful new features on its platform, including filters for Open Access articles and author affiliations. Using state-of-the-art technology, ScienceOpen enriches and exposes the context of research articles for a dynamic, multi-level search and discovery experience.

ScienceOpen currently indexes more than 28 million article records, 3 million of which are Open Access, and is rapidly accruing new content from a range of publishers across the STEM and HSS fields.

These new filtering functions will assist researchers in identifying relevant Open Access content more easily, and in exploring the output of particular institutes and universities. Publishers will also be able to easily document the impact of their Open Access content.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Dr. Stephanie Dawson, said “Our pace of innovation makes ScienceOpen one of the most interesting and fast-moving players in the market. We are delighted to continue to add new features to the search and discovery interface. We work very closely with the research community and publishers to provide the services that they need.”

Additional new features being released also include being able to sort content by the affiliation of an author at the time of publication, as well as the date articles were indexed at ScienceOpen. This means that ScienceOpen is rapidly becoming the smartest and most precise way to discover relevant research.

A filter for Open Access articles on ScienceOpen has been in constant demand from researchers. Co-founder of ScienceOpen, Prof. Alexander Grossmann, said “In a scholarly publishing environment where Open Access is becoming more common, we have to find ways to maximize its potential. Being able to more easily discover Open Access content will greatly enhance the research process for users across the globe.”

Publishers with the most Open Access content on ScienceOpen
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Promoting your articles to increase your digital identity and research impact

Authors are undoubtedly the best positioned to promote their own research. They know it inside out, they know people who might be most interested in it, and they know the places to maximise the potential audience. But still, with an increasing number of publications every year, it is important that researchers know how to promote their research to maximum effect, whether it is Open Access or not.

Here are our top ten suggestions to help increase your reach and impact! Most of these fall under two categories: Networking and maintaining your digital identity, and sharing your research to enhance its impact. Both are important in a modern scholarly environment, and can help to give you that competitive edge while making sure your’re maximising the potential of your research.

Continue reading “Promoting your articles to increase your digital identity and research impact”  

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Guidelines for free indexing applicants

Publishing can be a big, expensive business, or it can be done on a small scale by research communities themselves – by researchers for researchers. For very narrow topics and small research communities it can make sense to just do it yourself and there are wide range of journals that offer a formal peer review process, editorial oversight, publishing services and a Creative Commons open access license to authors but still charge no APCs.

To support these great efforts, ScienceOpen offers free indexing for up to 10 APC-free OA journals per month, and the best candidate receives a free journal collection page for 1 year. We are pleased to announce a partnership with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in making these valuable contributions to the scholarly record more visible.

In order to qualify for our free indexing offer your journal must meet the following requirements, all of which contribute to enhancing the visibility and discoverability of your content.

  • Be indexed in DOAJ and without publication charges

The Directory of Open Access Journals lists over 9000 open access scholarly journals meeting certain quality standards. Listing in DOAJ is a requirement for the ScienceOpen free indexing program to assure good quality articles from an editorial standpoint. Furthermore, having DOAJ IDs also ease the indexing procedure significantly. With your articles registered in DOAJ, the only thing you have to do is to check there are no APC or other publication charges and to send ScienceOpen a list of the DOAJ ID-s for each article record and your content will be indexed in no time.

Continue reading “Guidelines for free indexing applicants”  

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Ten Open Science New Year resolutions

A whole new year means a chance to start or continue building your profile as an Open Scientist! There are so many ways you can do this, from publishing Open Access and sharing your research data, to helping to teach students how to code or use GitHub. Every little bit helps.

Here are ten recommendations from us to kick-start the New Year with an Open Science bang!

  1. Update your ScienceOpen profile
    • We revamped our author/member profiles recently to make them more dynamic and generally useful for researchers!

      Example of the new author profiles (link)
  2. Get your author- and article-level metrics
    • They’re all right there on your profile page
    • They provide a great accompaniment to other ‘impact’ profiles such as with ImpactStory
  3. Get an ORCID account
    • ORCID is an essential part of research infrastructure
    • We use ORCID in multiple ways on our platform to make things easier for you
  4. Build a research collection for your community
    • Collections are now even better ways of getting your community to engage with research now
    • Just message me to get started!

      Enhanced collection features
  5. Use social media more – get it together!
    • Social media is an essential part of a researcher’s toolkit
    • Get on Twitter, start blogging, amplify your research!
  6. Upload your papers as pre- or post-prints
    • Use the SHERPA/RoMEO tool to see what journal policies are
    • Submit your manuscripts to an institutional or subject repository
    • Make your work Open Access easily and for free!

      Most journals allow self-archiving of some sort (source)
  7. Comment on or post-publication peer review an article
  8. Get an ImpactStory profile and tell your research story
    • ImpactStory is similarly integrated with ORCID, and is a great and fun way of documenting your story as a researcher

      ImpactStory profile example (link)
  9. Get a Publons account for your pre- and post-publication peer reviews
  10. Get informed about Open Science developments at a global level
    • Open Science is a vast and complex topic, see our Open Science Stars series for some context
    • We all need to take the responsibility in making sure we understand why making our research more open is important, and how to go about doing this

Do you have any Open Science New Years resolutions? Let us know in the comments!

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