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New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

Source: pixabay.com

To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading “New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”  

ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science

Suzhou, China

See below for the Chinese language translation.

ScienceOpen and CompuScript/International Science Editing partnership in China

For the formal press release, see our Press RoomSTM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

Chinese researchers face tremendous hurdles in communicating their research results to the rest of the world – from language barriers to internet restrictions and the traditional western bias of the scientific literature.

Confronted with the danger of being left out of the global scholarly communications, Chinese editors often publish in partnerships with publishers outside of China. This often leaves them having to give up control over the content to their global partners. However, to increase the discoverability of Chinese research in wider scientific circles, journals based in China now have new options to reach out to international audiences.

Over their 15-year history in China, CompuScript/International Science Editing—a leading European provider of publishing services to the scientific community headquartered in Ireland—have built a strong local network to help overcome these challenges, providing editorial and technical support to Chinese researchers, editors, and institutions. To support Chinese researchers and publishers and contribute to the mission of global open science, CompuScript/International Science Editing in China and ScienceOpen have partnered up to develop new products tailored specifically for the Chinese market and to utilize the full set of tools ScienceOpen offers for greater discoverability of Chinese research. Continue reading “ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science”  

In:  Collections, Other  

Oceans and Human Impact

Old Mug by Heath Alseike, Flickr, CC BY-SA

In recognition of World’s Oceans Day, ScienceOpen hosted a special article collection published by nonprofit Annual Reviews that address the topics of marine pollution, human impact and environmental stewardship, and marine species’ adaptation. The Oceans collection aims to raise awareness about the grave consequences of plastic debris in our oceans and the overall impact humans have on the marine environment.

Plastics contamination was first reported nearly 50 years ago, following the rise of commercial plastics production. According to ‘Plastics in the Marine Environment’ by Kara Laveder Law, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year in 2014. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats. In her article, Law presents a framework to evaluate the current “understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics”. In a similar vein, ‘Plastic as a Persistent Marine Pollutant’ by Boris Worm et al. discusses how marine plastics work their way into the food web in the first place. This article further presents the complex toxicology of plastic particles on marine life and how plastic can transfer up the food chain. Worm et al. offer solutions to the current crisis by suggesting a Global Convention on Plastic Pollution as a collaboration between “governments, producers, scientists, and citizens”.

In Kenneth R. Weiss’ interview with environmental engineer Jenna Jambeck—one of the co-authors of Plastic as a Persistent Marine Pollutant’—we discover that the pileup of plastic debris is more than ugly ocean litter. Jambeck argues that plastic gets consumed by marine organisms, which can be detrimental for both wildlife and humans:

 “Even though plastics are hard materials, at the microscopic level they absorb persistent organic compounds. Persistent organic pollutants like DDT, PCBs, flame retardants and fabric treatments have an affinity for plastic. Plastics act like sponges, soaking them up.” Continue reading “Oceans and Human Impact”  

In:  Aggregation, Other  

This does not belong in a museum! Digging for new Archaeology research on ScienceOpen

Modern research is about weaving together different strands of information, thought, and data to discover something we did not know before. At ScienceOpen, humanities research lives in harmony with Maths, Engineering and the Natural and Physical Sciences. We specialize in integrating research from across the  humanities and social sciences from disciplines such as Linguistics with Brill, Literature, History and Cultural Studies with the Open Library of Humanities, and Psychology with Hogrefe. Our ever-expanding humanities section includes rare delights such as Medieval Heritage, Comics, or Greek Linguistics.

Integration leads to discovery

By working with a range of publishers and transcending disciplines, our research network constantly finds new connections for users to explore. This enriched context is based on article-level citation and reference analysis, with each nod, or link, in this network designed to expand the horizons of researchers and help them to discover previously unknown relevant research. Recently, we took the diverse field of Archaeology and integrated it into this mix to see what happens.

Our recent additions to the discipline include the Open Access Internet Archeology, and the researcher-led collection Digital Archaeology (edited by Dominik Hagmann). These latest additions fit beautifully in to our already existing Archaeology corpus of 9980 research articles, with the 5 colourful featured Archaeology journals by Equinox already thriving among them.

Let’s take a look at what all this new research has to offer! They reveal to us the material remains of ancient cultures, historical accounts of past lives, and tell us stories about what is it like doing Archaeology in a modern, digital research environment.

Continue reading “This does not belong in a museum! Digging for new Archaeology research on ScienceOpen”  

In:  Aggregation, Other  

New partnership with the Chinese Academy of Science

During the last decade, China has made rapid progress towards making more of its research publications publicly accessible. Recognizing the contribution of Open Access (OA) to the advancement of global knowledge production, the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) has been helping to develop government-funded models of OA publication and open research policies to make knowledge produced by public investment in China public to the maximum benefit of all.

Today, we are happy to announce that one of CAS’ flagship Open Access journals, Journal of Radars, is now indexed on ScienceOpen. We’re very excited by this new partnership, as it meets our commitment to bring together the latest results from different fields, and cultural and geographical regions.

Shouxin Jia, Managing Editor of Journal of Radars said:

ScienceOpen is a high-end academic exchange platform, promoting and leading the science and technology and our co-operation will bring better visibility to developments in the radar field.

The journal is jointly run by the Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) and China Radar Industry Association (CRIA). Being a high-level academic exchange platform in China’s radar research, the journal covers the most important developments in radar technology in recent years and gives us a picture on the highly diverse modern uses of radars. These include:

All articles are Open Access and published under a Creative Commons 4.0 license which allows for the free re-distribution and re-use.

Journal of Radars

If you want to learn more about Open Access in China, or explore the range of Open Access content from China indexed on ScienceOpen, the selection of blog posts below will give you some insights.

Further reading

Open Access and language barriers in China

A whistle-stop tour of Open Access in China

Reflections of my trip to Shanghai – huge potential for OA

Xuan Yu, a man with a mission to bring Open Science to the Earth [Sciences]

Higher Education Press indexing partnership with ScienceOpen

Reconciling East and West in biomedical science: Family Medicine and Community Health and Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications are now indexed on ScienceOpen

Burgeoning green technologies on ScienceOpen

In:  Aggregation, Other  

New season kick-off for our free Open Access indexing competition

The new season delivered an excellent round of applications to kick-start our free Open Access indexing competition for this academic year.

These journals fulfil the double challenge of publishing high-quality Open Access research while charging no fees (APCs) to their authors. As such, they provide significant contributions to advancing open scholarship as well as a more democratic science from month to month.

To help these valuable contributions to the scholarly record to become more visible, we offer our winners a Featured Collection for one year for free. Collections are a specialized and customized promotional service to increase the visibility of selected journals within our discovery platform, also used to track and measure usage of research articles.

We are pleased to announce three new journals from across Europe that will be integrated into, and promoted on, ScienceOpen. These are:

KOME: An International Journal of Pure Communication Inquiry

Publisher: Hungarian Communication Studies Association

Country of publisher: Hungary

KOME is a theory and pure research-oriented journal of communication studies and related fields. It consists of useful supplements and reasonable alternatives to current models and theories and features theoretical researches that help to understand better, or deconceptualize the understanding of communication and the media.

As an important area in communication, current issues from the field of scholarly communication are also covered.

Cyborgs, desiring-machines, bodies without organs, and Westworld: Interrogating academic writing and scholarly identity

The Role of the Anonymous Voice in Post-Publication Peer Review Versus Traditional Peer Review

The Internet and the Nigerian Woman: A Case of Female Undergraduates

Control, Communication, and the Voice of the Leader. A ControlCharacter Analysis of the 2016 US Presidential Debate

We asked  Dr. János Tóth, Editor-in-Chief of KOME, about why they chose to enter the competition. He said:

We noticed the call when we were uploading the content of our most recent issue to DOAJ. To be completely honest, at first glance we were not sure about how our journal would find its place among your content -most of the indexed journals are from hard science fields-, but the interface looked very appealing, user-friendly, and there were a lot of additional options not seen on competitors’ services. We are constantly looking for new opportunities to reach toward international audiences, and, as someone who can already speak from experience, ScienceOpen seems to be in every respect an intelligent tool capable to help us achieve this goal.

SciPost Physics

Publisher: Stichting SciPost

Country of publisher: The Netherlands

SciPost Physics is a premium-quality, Open Access, peer-reviewed refereed Journal for the general field of Physics.

It aims at providing scientists with a publishing platform in which uncompromising scientific quality meets the highest achievable standards of open accessibility, with a resolutely international outlook.

Some of our favourite articles include:

The Infrared Physics of Bad Theories

Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

Quantum Monte Carlo detection of SU(2) symmetry breaking in the participation entropies of line subsystems

Irish Journal of Paramedicine

Publisher: Irish College of Paramedics

Country of publisher: Ireland

The Irish Journal of Paramedicine is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, international journal dedicated to advancing and promoting the science of prehospital clinical care, research, education, policy, management and operational delivery.

The Irish Journal of Paramedicine is the official journal of the Irish College of Paramedics, the professional body for Irish prehospital emergency care practitioners.

Here is a little teaser from their selected articles:

Identifying the barriers to female leadership in Paramedicine

On shift simulation in aeromedical operations – making it work

Dip(ping) into Foreign Waters…Irish Paramedics’ Royal College Experience

Congratulations to all of our winners!

Publishers and journals working with ScienceOpen benefit from increased visibility, usage and branding for their indexed content. Featured collections open up journal content for:

If you run a free to publish Open Access journal, participate in the competition today and get indexed on ScienceOpen for free! You can find the application form here.

Browse through the previous entry winners:

It’s the summer of Open Access love!

Warm welcome to the May winners of our free indexing competition

A whole new world of Open Access at ScienceOpen

Rewarding Open Access publishing with ScienceOpen

Reconciling East and West in biomedical science: Family Medicine and Community Health and Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications are now indexed on ScienceOpen

Medieval heritage unlimited

Open Access in the Cause of Social Clinical Health Support

New journals coming to ScienceOpen!

Platinum indexing for platinum journals

 

In:  Other  

Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen

Unique

Peer review at ScienceOpen is a little different to what you might be used to.

Does the fact that a paper has been published, and therefore peer reviewed, mean that it is flawless? Does it mean that the conversation around that research should stop? We do not think so. The only reason there would ever be no value in doing post-publication evaluation would be if all published work were completely infallible. Which is clearly not the case. This is, after all, why we continue to do research and build upon the work of those before us!

Therefore, we enable post-publication peer review across 34 million article records, as a form of final-version commenting. It can also be performed on preprints from the arXiv. These are essentially treated as open, pre-review manuscripts. Users can organise these into collections, and manage peer review entirely themselves as a community process.

Managed

We have now added a new feature that enables any of our users to invite another researcher to perform peer review on our platform. This is in the same way that an Editor does for a journal, as part of a fully transparent process – the theme for Peer Review Week this year! The difference to the traditional process of peer review is that this is more democratic as it is open to anyone.

Step 1 – Find a paper of interest.

All article pages now have an ‘Invite to Review’ button. Click it, and you have 2 options.

  1. Search within the ScienceOpen userbase to see if the person you want to review already has a profile with us.
  2. Add an email, or list of emails, of who you want to invite to review, if they don’t already have a ScienceOpen profile.
Step 2 – Invite your colleagues to review!

That’s it. It’s that easy. This combines the editorial management of peer review with open participation. We enable this to make sure that the process is fair, but efficient. This means that anyone within your research community can contribute to the research process, should they wish to.

Continue reading “Managing transparent peer review at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Other  

ScienceOpen interview series: Prof. George Perry, world expert on Alzheimer’s Disease

Professor George Perry is the Dean of the College of Sciences at the University of Texas in San Antonio. He is recognised as a world expert in the field of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, we spoke with Prof. Perry about his research, including his new ScienceOpen collection.

(Source)

Hi Prof. Perry! You are recognised as one of the 100 top scientists in Neuroscience and Behaviour, and have incredibly amassed more than 1300 research publications to date! What’s the secret to your success?  

Persistence and focus on collecting and publishing highly useful data and insights.

Do you ever find it difficult maintaining your public profile with so many publications? How did you find the ORCID integration at ScienceOpen?

Maintaining numerous profiles as up-to-date requires constant monitoring. Linking datasets with ORCID does assist.

Your research focusses on the processes leading to neuronal damage. What have been your key discoveries to date?

Primarily, establishing oxidative stress in Alzheimer’s disease. Second, new insights regarding the cell biology of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your ScienceOpen collection is on alternative approaches to Alzheimer’s disease. What is the ‘alternative’ in this case, and why is this so important?

It is the alternative to the amyloid cascade, which dominates our field. The collection presents a biological view of Alzheimer’s disease.

What do you hope to achieve with your ScienceOpen collection? And how can we help you with this?

The collection provides a group of papers that illuminates an alternative to amyloid as the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.  I use it when communicating with others about weakness and alternatives, and to demonstrate that the amyloid cascade has been questioned for over two decades.

Thank you for your time, Prof. Perry. It has been great to learn from your insight and experience!

 

In:  Other  

ScienceOpen Collecting and Connecting with ORCID

ORCID have recognised the discovery and networking platform ScienceOpen for leadership in integrating their services as part of their Collect and Connect program.

Under ORCID’s mantra of “Enter once, reuse often”, Collect and Connect is designed for member organizations to collect, display, connect and synchronize data between research information systems. This was developed to streamline the integration process across a range of research systems, funders, and publishers.

ORCID has been at the foundation of ScienceOpen since inception, enabling verified users to integrate their published content, build collections, and perform post-publication peer review across publishers and journals for free.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are delighted to be among the first recognized by ORCID as part of their Collect and Connect Program. ORCID has been essential to our development, and together we will continue to build a robust scholarly infrastructure for all stakeholders.”

ScienceOpen features alongside other leaders, including eLife, Overleaf, and Editorial Manager, all committed to creating valid assertions about scholarly connectivity in a reliable, trustworthy, and transparent way.

Laure Haak, Executive Director of ORCID, said “ScienceOpen has been a huge supporter of ORCID – both by demonstrating in practice how iDs enable profile platforms and also through your incredible researcher engagement activities.  Our badges are a small but important official acknowledgement for your actions. Thank you for your leadership in the open research community!”

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