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Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

Peering into the mind of our Neuroimaging Collection Editor, Jonathan Peelle

This year in our Open Science Stars series, we’ve heard from researchers in Europe and Asia and their experiences of the publishing world, as well as from funders like the Gates Foundation. Today, we’ve interviewed Jonathan Peelle, a cognitive psychologist working in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University in Saint Louis. Jonathan recently built a collection on Neuroimaging Methods (ways to look inside your brain..), at ScienceOpen, so we decided it would be nice to turn the tables and pick his brain instead to learn about his research background and interests in open science!

  1. Hi Jonathan! Thanks for joining us. Can you tell us a bit about your research interests?

My research is focused on the neuroscience of language processing, and how sensory and cognitive systems interact to enable communication. We are interested in questions like:

  • How can we understand people we’ve never heard before?
  • Why is having a conversation in noise harder for some people than for others?
  • How similar is brain activity across a group of people?

My lab spends a lot of time studying people with hearing loss and cochlear implants because of the profound effects these have on sensory processing. We rely on converging evidence from behavioral studies, structural MRI, and functional neuroimaging.

MRI scan of human head in a patient with benign familial macrocephaly (Source)

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In:  About SO  

Getting started at ScienceOpen

We recognise that some times it’s not clear exactly what you’re supposed to do when joining a new research platform. What are the important features, what’s everybody else doing, how do I make my profile as strong as possible? Well, hopefully this will make it easier for you. If you’re still wondering ‘What’s that ScienceOpen thing all about?’, hopefully this will add a bit of clarity too!

Here are the main things you need to know about ScienceOpen:

  • Get an ORCID account

More than 3 million researchers already have an ORCID account, which acts as both a unique identifier and an integrated profile for them. Registration for it takes 30 seconds, and is now a core part of scholarly infrastructure, with many journals requiring an ORCID profile prior to article submission. Make sure it’s well-populated with all of your published papers, (drawn automatically from Web of Science, Scopus, or CrossRef). Easy!

  • Refresh your profile from ORCID

*click* Done.

From your profile page (eg here)

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Improve your literature review routine and get your daily dose of science with us

Literature review is a crucial aspect of scientific work, with every single published research paper requiring one as part of the Introduction. Still, keeping up with the rapidly growing body of literature can be a daunting and time consuming task, and difficult to integrate into the everyday routine for many researchers. Being not an urgent, deadline-driven kind of activity, regular literature review often lands on the bottom of to-do lists.

However, with more than 2 million research papers published each year, how are you supposed to efficiently stay on top of this?

This is especially the case in the era of digital publishing when the power of established, high impact factor journal brands is becoming less important compared to article-level metrics and individual assessments. In this dynamically changing environment of scientific communication, keeping an open mind and providing critical evaluation of the literature have never been more important.

Consequently, signing up to individual RSS feeds or browsing through the contents of each of the key journals of your field of research is simply not an efficient way to keep yourself up to date.

It’s discovery time! (source)

At ScienceOpen, we offer powerful solutions for staying on top of recently published articles. By following the 3 steps below, you can easily integrate an effective literature review and discovery routine into your research life.

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A whole new world of Open Access at ScienceOpen

Today we are pleased to announce the winners of the April round of our free Open Access indexing competition.

These journals come from around the world, and by offering free-to-publish Open Access options for researchers, we in turn offer them free integration into our platform to help build their status and visibility.

The following journals will all become part of our next-generation indexing and discovery platform:

Cardiometry (Russia)

Published by the Russian New University, this journal is devoted to cardiological issues with special focus on cardiovascular system performance and diagnostics. The title of the journal, Cardiometry, is a new field in cardiology providing application of the most up-to-date technologies of measurements of heart and cardiovascular system performance parameters and considered as an interdisciplinary scientific field joining cardiology, biophysics, biomechanics, IT and metrology.

Tobacco Prevention & Cessation (Greece)

Published by European Publishing, this journal encompasses all aspects of tobacco use, prevention and cessation that can promote a tobacco free society. Their aim is to foster, promote and disseminate research involving tobacco use, prevention, policy implementation, disease development- progression related to tobacco use, tobacco use impact from the cellular to the international level and the treatment of tobacco attributable disease through smoking cessation.

Desert (Iran)

Published by the University of Tehran, Desert covers all aspects of environmental management of arid, semi-arid and desert environments and addresses issues ranging from basic to socio-ecological systems of arid, semi-arid and desert ecosystems.

Revista do Instituto Florestal (Brazil)

Published by the Instituto Florestal (Institute of Forestry) of São Paulo, this journal is dedicated to works in Forestry Sciences and related sciences written in Portuguese, English or Spanish. It publishes articles in the following thematic areas: urban tree planting, protected areas and nature conservation, wildlife conservation, ecology, forestry policy and economy, genetics and forest improvement, geography and environmental planning, hydrology, plant taxonomy and phytogeography and forest products technology.

All of these journals fulfil the double challenge of publishing high-quality Open Access research while charging no APCs to their authors. As such, they provide significant contributions to open scholarship as well as democracy in science from month to month.

To support these great efforts, we recently partnered with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) to help make these valuable sources of the published scholarly record more visible and easily accessible in a competitive global research environment.

Bringing together results from different fields of research and geographical regions, successful applicants will add new colours to our research network of over 31 million articles and growing.

Thank you to everyone who applied for the latest round of ScienceOpen’s free indexing competition! We are also grateful to DOAJ for their valuable contributions.

To apply for the next round, an application form can be found here.  As a little help, you can find our guidelines here. Good luck!

In:  Peer Review  

Peer Review Week 2017 is all about transparency

At ScienceOpen, we have been pushing for greater transparency in peer review since our inception. We inject transparency at multiple levels, by identifying referees, publishing reports, providing formal recognition for contributions, and encouraging open interaction on our platform (more details here).

This is why we’re extremely stoked to see the theme for this year’s Peer Review Week to be all around the theme of transparency!

The idea for the first Peer Review Week, held in 2015, grew out of informal conversations between ORCID, ScienceOpen, PRE (Peer Review Evaluation), Sense About Science, and Wiley, the organizations that planned and launched the initiative in 2015. Last year, ScienceOpen hosted a webinar with Nature, PaperHive, and Publons along the theme of recgnising review.

In 2017, we are helping to organise a session at the Peer Review Congress to help showcase what peer review should look like when it works. We look forward to working with the other partner organisations and the global scholarly community in helping to make peer review a fairer, more transparent process.

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In:  About SO  

ScienceOpen is a resource for the community

A core concept for our evolving understanding of open research and scholarship is that of equity and fairness within the global research community. At ScienceOpen, this is something we strongly believe in, and work together with a range of publishers and researchers to play our part in making this a reality for research.

As part of our mission, we therefore try to break down barriers in research, and prefer to build bridges over walls. Here are just some examples of how we do this, and in doing so contribute to building a platform that acts as a social community space for all researchers.

We harvest content from across platforms like PubMed Central, arXiv, SciELO and bring it all together in one place

One of the main features of ScienceOpen is that we are a research aggregator. We don’t select what we index based on discipline, publisher, or geography, as that just creates another silo. Enough of those exist already. What we need, and what we do, is to bring together research articles from across publishers and other platforms and into one space, where it is all treated in exactly the same way.

When you have articles displayed in this way, factors such as journal brands and impact factors play less importance than the actual content itself. Users can make their own choices about what to read, review, share, and re-use based on their own expertise and evaluation, or the social context provided by our other users.

We also don’t just focus on the hard sciences or the humanities and social sciences. Too often are the main fields of research and disciplines segregated from each other, rather than being used together in inter-disciplinary harmony. This is why we integrate research from across fields and at different levels, such as with the fantastic Open Library of Humanities, and also more recently a whole range of new content to help emphasise this from Materials Science, Biomedical Science, Entomology, Archaeology, Medical and Health Research, and er, dinosaurs.

Last year, SciELO integrated more than 500,000 Open Access articles with us from across Latin America, for the first time putting all of this research on the same level as that from research contained within PubMed Central. There is no reason why there should be geographical segregation of research across platforms. We believe that all research deserves to be read and re-used by anyone, irrespective of where that research was conducted and who published it.

Open Access isn’t just about access to knowledge, but also principles of equality, and to achieve that we have to recognize the value of research from around the world.

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In:  Collections  
Another researcher-led collection ticked off!

Another researcher-led collection ticked off!

We have a brand new collection that’s just itching for interaction on Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens! It contains more than 11,000 peer reviewed research articles, with a combined readership of almost 50,000 on our platform already.

ScienceOpen users can read, share, recommend, review, and apply all of our advanced search and discovery tools to this collection, including applying our recently launched ‘Open Access’ filter.

This collection is focused on the wide field of research on ticks and tick-transmitted pathogens. It aims to include papers on a wide variety of disciplines related to ticks and the pathogens they transmit, focused (but not limited) to morphology and systematics of ticks, ecology, reports of pathogens in both ticks and their hosts. A secondary aim is to provide global view of the effects of climate and land use changes on the pattern of distribution of these arthropods.

We spoke with the collection Editor, Professor Agustín Estrada-Peña, about why he decided to build this collection for his research community.

(Source)

Can you tell us why you tell us about your research interests in ticks and tick-borne diseases?

I am Agustín Estrada-Peña. I have several titles behind my name, but they do not have importance in this context. Let’s just say that I am Professor of Zoonoses and Parasitology in the University of Zaragoza (Spain). My work is focused on ticks and tick-transmitted organisms. I did work on systematics, physiology, life cycles, and the probable impact of environmental change on the pathogens they can transmit. I have been enrolled with FAO, WHO, and recently with the European Center for Disease Control in different aspects regarding human and animal health and ticks. My current interest is on the way the ecological relationships between ticks, microorganisms and vertebrates emerged and evolved. I am working on new ways to explore these relationships and on the molecular aspects behind them.

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Matters matter. Recent additions from the field of materials science

Expanding the limits of the materials available and thereby satisfying everyday needs was always a key challenge and the cornerstone of human cultural development. The constant discovery and development of new materials and the improvement of their performance to meet the challenges of the current day world grew out to be a faster and faster evolving discipline called Materials Science in the competitive global economy.

From nanotechnology, metallurgy, medical technology, aviation or computer science, materials science is used to advance understanding in a variety of research areas in order to develop smart oil refinery components, bioactive hip implants, the safest cars, the lightest notebooks and countless other new products and technologies that will make our lives safer, more sustainable and more convenient.

We at ScienceOpen want to be a part of this story. Our new partnerships with Carl Hanser Verlag, AIMS Press and Italian Group of Fracture (Gruppo Italiano Frattura) allow us to bring together the latest result of this diverse field.

Below you can find the journals now indexed on our site, and a teaser from their selected articles. Take a peek!

International Polymer Processing

As a result of our new partnership with Carl Hanser Verlag, two of their e-journals from the field of materials science, International Polymer Processing (IPP) and HTM Journal of Heat Treatment and Materials are now indexed on ScienceOpen.

IPP is dedicated to the study of polymers. As such, the journal offers original research contributions, invited review papers and recent technological developments in processing thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers and fibers as well as polymer reaction engineering. For more than 25 years IPP, the journal of the Polymer Processing Society, provides strictly peer-reviewed, high-quality articles and rapid communications from the leading experts around the world. Articles cover topics like:

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In:  Other  

ScienceOpen is marching for science!

This week, on Saturday, April 22nd (Earth Day) the global science-interested community is uniting to march for science across the world. Many of our members will be joining the March for Science in Washington DC and other cities around the world.

The March for Science is about the role that science plays in our everyday lives, but also about political activism for researchers, celebrating the diversity of research cultures, and making sure that policy developments are grounded in strong evidence.

You can follow the events live on Twitter at #MarchForScience

ScienceOpen will be part of the global march, and in five different locations! A more informed dialogue between scientists and citizens requires openness, transparency, and access to information – one of the key mission statements of ScienceOpen, and the reason we will be out marching in force.

CEO Stephanie Dawson will be marching in Berlin, Germany, with other members of our team there. Find her on Twitter and join them here!

Prof. Alexander Grossman, co-founder of ScienceOpen, will be taking to the streets in Leipzig, Germany. Get in touch here.

Tibor Tscheke, the other co-founder of ScienceOpen, will also be marching in Boston, USA! Contact him here.

Jon Tennant will be in Seattle, USA, joining the Science March as part of the Sage Bionetworks Assembly. Contact him here.

Erzsébet Toth-Czifra will be marching in Budapest, Hungary, too, and you can reach her here.

We welcome anyone and everyone to stand by our sides with the rest of the march, and together celebrate science as a global community!

In:  Announcements  

New free indexing competition winners

ScienceOpen offers free indexing to Open Access journals that are free for authors to publish in, as part of our mission to enhance open scholarship.

We recently partnered with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) to help make these valuable contributions to the scholarly record more visible.

In the latest round of our indexing competition, we are pleased to announce three new journals from across Europe that will be integrated into and promoted on our platform. These are:

  • Management: Journal of Contemporary Management Issues, from Croatia

Published by the University of Split, this journal publishes articles from the Social Sciences, including topics in industries, land use, labour, and industrial management.

  • Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, from Spain

Published by the Universidad de La Laguna, this journal publishes articles in Spanish, Castilian, and English in the fields of Language and Literature, Linguistics, Communication, and the Mass Media.

  • Studia z Filologii Polskiej i Słowiańskiej, from Poland

Published by the Institute of Slavic Studies at the Polish Academy of Sciences, this journal publishes articles from the field of Linguistics in Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, and English.

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