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Tag: Aggregation

In:  About SO  

Getting started at ScienceOpen

We recognise that some times it’s not clear exactly what you’re supposed to do when joining a new research platform. What are the important features, what’s everybody else doing, how do I make my profile as strong as possible? Well, hopefully this will make it easier for you. If you’re still wondering ‘What’s that ScienceOpen thing all about?’, hopefully this will add a bit of clarity too!

Here are the main things you need to know about ScienceOpen:

  • Get an ORCID account

More than 3 million researchers already have an ORCID account, which acts as both a unique identifier and an integrated profile for them. Registration for it takes 30 seconds, and is now a core part of scholarly infrastructure, with many journals requiring an ORCID profile prior to article submission. Make sure it’s well-populated with all of your published papers, (drawn automatically from Web of Science, Scopus, or CrossRef). Easy!

  • Refresh your profile from ORCID

*click* Done.

From your profile page (eg here)

Continue reading “Getting started at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Other  

Guidelines for free indexing applicants

Publishing can be a big, expensive business, or it can be done on a small scale by research communities themselves – by researchers for researchers. For very narrow topics and small research communities it can make sense to just do it yourself and there are wide range of journals that offer a formal peer review process, editorial oversight, publishing services and a Creative Commons open access license to authors but still charge no APCs.

To support these great efforts, ScienceOpen offers free indexing for up to 10 APC-free OA journals per month, and the best candidate receives a free journal collection page for 1 year. We are pleased to announce a partnership with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in making these valuable contributions to the scholarly record more visible.

In order to qualify for our free indexing offer your journal must meet the following requirements, all of which contribute to enhancing the visibility and discoverability of your content.

  • Be indexed in DOAJ and without publication charges

The Directory of Open Access Journals lists over 9000 open access scholarly journals meeting certain quality standards. Listing in DOAJ is a requirement for the ScienceOpen free indexing program to assure good quality articles from an editorial standpoint. Furthermore, having DOAJ IDs also ease the indexing procedure significantly. With your articles registered in DOAJ, the only thing you have to do is to check there are no APC or other publication charges and to send ScienceOpen a list of the DOAJ ID-s for each article record and your content will be indexed in no time.

Continue reading “Guidelines for free indexing applicants”  

Rewarding Open Access publishing with ScienceOpen

After several highly successful rounds of our free indexing competition (see here and here), we are pleased to announce a further 6 new journals will be added in the New Year, along with the 12 new publishing clients we recently added!

These journals are:

  1. Basic and Clinical Neuroscience (link)
  2. Health in Emergencies & Disasters Quarterly (HDQ) (with a promotional free collection) (link)
  3. Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies (link)
  4. Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology (JACIT) (link)
  5. Frattura ed Integrità Strutturale (Fracture and Structural Integrity) (link)
  6. Journal of Applied and Computational Mechanics (link)
Individual journals now come with their own highly-appealing set of re-use metrics.

Publishers working with ScienceOpen benefit from increased visibility, usage and branding for their indexed content. By getting indexed on ScienceOpen, you:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

Continue reading “Rewarding Open Access publishing with ScienceOpen”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced journal pages at ScienceOpen

In case you missed it, to kick off the New Year we redesigned our search interface and made it more powerful and useful in a range of ways. You don’t even have to sign up to take advantage of our advanced search and discovery functions with metrics about your favorite journals and publishers.

Journal upgrades

One of our favourite upgrades is how each of more than 24,000 journals are featured and displayed. Now it is possible for anyone to see what journals exist on our platform and how many articles are tracked for each one of them. That’s the first step. Try searching for your favourite journal, or even a journal you work for, and seeing what we have for it.

24,000 journals, arranged by how much content we have indexed from each on our platform.

Continue reading “Enhanced journal pages at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Aggregation  

New partnership with PeerJ

Today, we’re pleased to announce a new partnership with the Open Access publisher PeerJ! We are all  very excited to have PeerJ joining us as one of the leading and most innovative open access publishers, and we are happy to see them continuing to help push the curve for scholarly communication.

You can read the press release here and access all the new content here.

Jason Hoyt, co-founder and CEO of PeerJ said “Computer Science has traditionally been published in conference proceedings, so an Open Access journal is a relatively new scholarly channel, but one that we believe the community is ready to embrace. To get there though, Open Access needs more visibility and that’s why we’re thrilled to be working with ScienceOpen.”

Continue reading “New partnership with PeerJ”  

In:  Aggregation  

New partnership with River Publishers

At ScienceOpen, we offer next-generation indexing services to publishers. The purpose of this for publishers is to:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique platform
  • Open up the context of your content

Recently, we have partnered with River Publishers to highlight two of their Open Access journals.

river-publishers

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In:  Aggregation  

ScienceOpen smashes through the 20 million article record mark

Today, we are pleased to announce that ScienceOpen hit the 20 million article record! In fact, it’s still climbing even as this is being written. This is thanks to what we call our ‘aggregation’ engine, which takes published research articles from any field, and applies a little bit of magic to them to open up their context and let us all do amazing things, such as find similar articles, post-publication peer review them, and trace their citation genealogies.

I asked Alexander Grossmann, professor of publishing and co-founder of ScienceOpen, what this milestone means to him and to open science more broadly.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen smashes through the 20 million article record mark”  

Higher Education Press indexing partnership with ScienceOpen

Higher Education Press (HEP) will be indexing one of their flagship Open Access journals, Frontiers of Agricultural Science and Engineering (FASE), with ScienceOpen, adding to our current archive of over 11 million article records.

FASE is one of the leading Open Access journals in the fields of Agricultural Engineering, Resources and Biotechnology, Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Applied Ecology, Crop Science, Forestry Engineering and Fisheries, Horticulture, and Plant Protection.

By adding their content to ScienceOpen, they gain increased visibility through our platform and promotional services (like this article!), which increases its value amidst a heterogeneous global publishing market.

This cooperation between HEP and ScienceOpen helps to recognise the great work that Chinese publishers are doing to spearhead Open Access publishing, and our dual commitment to enhancing the visibility and impact of scholarly research in Engineering Science fields.

CEO of ScienceOpen Stephanie Dawson said “Open Access is a growing force in China, and we are happy to work with one of the leading publishers, Higher Education Press, to help increase the visibility of Chinese Open Access globally. We are pleased to use Frontiers of Agricultural Science and Engineering to launch this new partnership, as it publishes excellent research in a field addressing pressing issues such as food security in a changing world.”

What are we doing with the new content?

Collection screenshot
Day 1 after releasing the Collection.

For starters, the journal now has its own Collection! This means each article can be shared, recommended, peer reviewed, and commented upon, and as the content is all OA it’s easily discoverable and accessible via the publishers website.

The advantage of this for HEP is that they gain lots of additional traffic to their content. What publisher doesn’t want that? This means more downloads, and more re-use of the research they publish, which in turn increases the quality and prestige associated with the journal brand. You can track the attention of the Collection easily via reader count aggregates, and altmetric aggregates, as seen here, as well as other measures of re-use.

Researchers can now openly peer review and re-use their content too, which adds substantial value to both the research process and the journal brand again, which are both important in a scholarly publishing system that is becoming progressively more open. We’ll report the progress in these statistics again in a month so you can see the additional attention indexing with us generates!

The Collection contains some absolutely awesome papers too! Check these examples out:

  1. Biofuels and food security. A pretty important issue, I think we can all agree on!
  2. Another on protein and food security in China.
  3. Does air pollution affect food security in China?
  4. Another page in the ongoing CRISPR
  5. How does grain leave its water footprint around China?
  6. How to get high and efficient grain yield in rice.
  7. How much food is wasted in China?
  8. Cloned sheep. Enough said.
  9. The genetic variation of Appaloosa horses from Argentina.
  10. This one has ‘gene knockout sheep’ in the title, and CRISPR.

Indexing at ScienceOpen is a great way to enhance journal visibility and facilitate maximal re-use of research content.

Who else wants to join us? J (contact CEO Stephanie.Dawson@ScienceOpen.com for more information) (press release)

Pimp my search engine

Search engines form the core of discovery of research these days. There’s just too much information out there to search journal by journal or on a manual basis.

We highlighted in a previous post the advantages of using ScienceOpen’s dual-layered search and filter functions over others like Google Scholar. Today, we’re happy to announce that we just made it even better!

Say you want to search all of PeerJ’s content. Pop ‘PeerJ’ into the journal search, and it’ll come up with all their content, as it’s all indexed in PubMed. Hey presto, there you have 1530 papers, all with full texts attached. Neat eh! And that will update as more gets published with PeerJ, so you know what to do.

1

But that’s a lot of content. What you’ve just discovered is the PeerJ megajournal haystack. We want to filter out the needles.

Continue reading “Pimp my search engine”  

Moving beyond a journal-based filtering system

The amount of published scientific research is simply enormous. Current estimates are over 70 million individual research articles, with around 2 million more being published every year. We are in the midst of an information revolution, with the World Wide Web offering rapid, structured and practical distribution of knowledge. But for researchers, this creates the monolith task of manually finding relevant content to fuel their work, and begs the question, are we doing the best we can to leverage this knowledge?

There are already several well-established searchable archives, scientific databases representing warehouses for all of our knowledge and data. The most well-known include the Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, and Google Scholar, which together are the de facto mode for current methods of information retrieval. The first two of these are paid services, and attempts to replicate searches between all platforms produce inconsistent results (e.g., Bakkalbasi et al., Kulkarni et al.), raising questions about each of their methods of procurement. The search algorithms for each are also fairly opaque, and the relative reliability of each is quite uncertain. Each of them, though, have their own benefits and pitfalls, which are far better discussed elsewhere (e.g. Falagas et al.).

So where does this leave discoverability for researchers in a world that is becoming more and more ‘open’?

Continue reading “Moving beyond a journal-based filtering system”