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What can a Researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Image by Steve Rainwater, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen provides researchers with a wide range of tools to support their research – all for free. Here is a short checklist to make sure you are getting the most of the technological infrastructure and content that we have to offer. What can a researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Discover

  • Multi-dimensional search in millions of article records for quick orientation: Filter your search by 18 filters including open access, preprint, author, affiliation, keyword, content type, source, and more. Sort your results by Altmetric score, citations, date, usage, and rating. Use the article Collections by other researchers to help narrow your search.
  • Export search results in EndNote, BibTex, and Reference Manager (RIS) formats for easy integration with other reference management systems. Up to 200 citations exported at a time.
  • Save your search to find the newest articles in your field with one click. ScienceOpen is adding thousands of articles to the database daily.
  • Bookmark the articles you are interested to explore later.

Create

  • Edit a Collection to present the best research in your field for better discovery by your peers. Or, run it as an overlay “journal” with the newest preprints. Create a comprehensive bibliography of a subject or just highlight the top 20 papers in your discipline. The Collection functionality is built to flexibly meet a wide range of goals for the research community.
  • Review an article to share your expertise with the community. An article review, similar to a book review, provides an analysis of the work and recommendations to readers. A review on ScienceOpen is linked with ORCID and published with a Crossref DOI and best-practice XML metadata for discovery across all systems. To ensure expert reviews, the ScienceOpen requires 5 publications for automatic reviewer status. We make exceptions on an individual basis, so just get in touch with the ScienceOpen team if you would like to review (info@scienceopen.com). You can also invite any researcher to review an article with one click.
  • Write an Author Summary to explain your research in plain language to the general public. You can add a summary, thumbnail image, keywords, and disciplines to your article record on ScienceOpen to increase the discoverability of your research.
  • Articles missing? You can help us to improve the ScienceOpen database by uploading the DOIs of important articles that you are missing on the site. You can then add these to your Collection, publication list, or bookmarks.

Network

  • Your ScienceOpen Profile is integrated with ORCID for a low-maintenance presence on the platform. Add publications from or to your ORCID record with one click. Biography, affiliation, education, and more can be synchronized with ORCID.
  • An interactive bibliography on ScienceOpen opens your publications to search and sort by altmetrics, citations, date, and more. Gain insight about your own work and share with your colleagues
  • Track usage, citations, altmetrics of your publications on ScienceOpen and watch it develop over time. A whole suite of metrics are available at your fingertips.
  • Follow researchers for updates on their activities and to expand your network.

We love to hear back from our users about features that are particularly useful or ones that are missing. Just get in touch at feedback@scienceopen.com or on Twitter @Science_Open or Facebook.

Orienting yourself using ScienceOpen search

Searching is the basis of discovery

“Search is the new journal!”, was one of the rallying cries at the recent Force11 meeting in Berlin. But what does this mean? Well, we have a bit of a problem in research – there is so much content being published these days, about 2-3 million papers each year from around 50,000 journals! It has never been more crucial to have efficient ways of searching to discover relevant work for your research question. No single human is capable of this alone.

Now, we know Google Scholar is usually everyone’s search engine of choice for research articles. But when you pop in a search term, how do you know what research is good, what’s relevant to you, what people are talking about? You just get an enormous list that trails off with ever-decreasing relevance, and are supposed to be able to figure that all out yourself. We can do better.

Quality and quantity

Efficient search is the core issue that our freely accessible multi-layer discovery engine is helping to solve. The current database at ScienceOpen has more than 36 million article records, and growing at around 100,000 new records each week. Each of these records is linked within the database to other articles through our open citation network.

Smart search – because it’s 2017! (click to learn more)

We use this citation information, and other article metadata, to provide an enriched search ecosystem for users. The purpose of this is to allow users to drill down to relevant research using a range of different contexts and criteria, saving time and energy, and facilitating research discovery at multiple dimensions.

Sort by citation count

Citations are still one of the main forms of ‘academic’ currency in a modern research world. Citations only measure how many times a piece of work has been cited without additional context. As such, they are a simple proxy for ‘scholarly discussion’ of a piece of work, but beyond this are essentially devoid of legitimacy as a metric.

Sorting a search result by citations allows you to see what is most popular in a research context, and which articles have been particularly important in developing new disciplines, ideas, and ways of thinking. Identifying highly-cited articles provides for you a great starting point for further discovery. Citations reveal to you the lineage of ideas – start at the top, and work your way down! Understanding the historical context of ideas is critical for good research, and ScienceOpen helps you to explore this.

Sort by Altmetric score

Altmetric scores are a combined measure of social attention for articles. They give us a nice idea of how much an article is being discussed in news outlets or on social media. If you want to keep up with the buzz in your field, or find out what’s of interest in another, ScienceOpen gives you the tools for that.

Altmetrics. So hot right now.

Continue reading “Orienting yourself using ScienceOpen search”  

In:  About SO  

Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

Last week, we unveiled MyScienceOpen, our new professional networking platform for researchers. MySciencOpen comes with a whole cadre of new features that combine the functionality of a range of existing social platforms, and bring them directly to you all in one place. You get access to all of this at the click of a button through our ORCID integration. Free, legal, and easy!

One of the main new features we’ve added is the ability for authors to upload non-specialist summaries to their articles. This is great for increasing the visibility and impact of your research at the point of discovery.

But how can you track this increased impact? Aha, well, we thought of that. Every user at ScienceOpen now has a whole suite of brand new metrics that track how their content is being re-used across ScienceOpen.

Quantifying your context

Everyone can see the tab for your content in context. These show how many total ‘nodes’ or connections your work forms in the context of the ScienceOpen platform. We show:

  • Your total number of publications
  • Your total number of different journals published in
  • How many co-authors you’ve published with
  • How many articles you’ve referenced
  • How many articles in our database have cited you
Exhibit 1

Continue reading “Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?”  

In:  About SO  

Getting started at ScienceOpen

We recognise that some times it’s not clear exactly what you’re supposed to do when joining a new research platform. What are the important features, what’s everybody else doing, how do I make my profile as strong as possible? Well, hopefully this will make it easier for you. If you’re still wondering ‘What’s that ScienceOpen thing all about?’, hopefully this will add a bit of clarity too!

Here are the main things you need to know about ScienceOpen:

  • Get an ORCID account

More than 3 million researchers already have an ORCID account, which acts as both a unique identifier and an integrated profile for them. Registration for it takes 30 seconds, and is now a core part of scholarly infrastructure, with many journals requiring an ORCID profile prior to article submission. Make sure it’s well-populated with all of your published papers, (drawn automatically from Web of Science, Scopus, or CrossRef). Easy!

  • Refresh your profile from ORCID

*click* Done.

From your profile page (eg here)

Continue reading “Getting started at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Other  

Promoting your articles to increase your digital identity and research impact

Authors are undoubtedly the best positioned to promote their own research. They know it inside out, they know people who might be most interested in it, and they know the places to maximise the potential audience. But still, with an increasing number of publications every year, it is important that researchers know how to promote their research to maximum effect, whether it is Open Access or not.

Here are our top ten suggestions to help increase your reach and impact! Most of these fall under two categories: Networking and maintaining your digital identity, and sharing your research to enhance its impact. Both are important in a modern scholarly environment, and can help to give you that competitive edge while making sure your’re maximising the potential of your research.

Continue reading “Promoting your articles to increase your digital identity and research impact”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced article context at ScienceOpen

As part of our ongoing development of ScienceOpen 2.017, we have designed an exciting and most importantly, pretty, new context-enhanced webpage for each of our 27 million article records. Such enriched article metadata is becoming increasingly important in defining the context of research in the evolution of scholarly communication, in which we are moving away from journal- to article-level evaluation.

Statistically significant upgrades

All of the statistics have been moved to the top of the page, including the number of page views or readers, the Altmetric score, the number of recommendations, and the number of social media shares.

Source

Newly featured statistics include the top references cited within, the top articles citing that paper, and the number of similar articles based on keywords and topics. These new features are great for authors as content creators, researchers as users, as well as publishers for understanding the popularity and context of research they publish.

Continue reading “Enhanced article context at ScienceOpen”  

Why ScienceOpen Research doesn’t have an impact factor

ScienceOpen is more than just a publisher – we’re an open science platform!

We publish from across the whole spectrum of research: Science, Technology, Engineering, Humanities, Mathematics, Social Sciences. Every piece of research deserves an equal chance to be published, irrespective of its field.

We also don’t discriminate based on the type of research.  Original research, small-scale studies, opinion pieces, “negative” or null findings, review articles, data and software articles, case reports, and replication studies. We publish it all.

At ScienceOpen, we believe that the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is a particularly poor way of measuring the impact of scholarly publishing. Furthermore, we think that it is a highly misleading metric for research assessment despite its widespread [mis-]use for this, and we strongly encourage researchers to adhere to the principles of DORA and the Leiden Manifesto.

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This is why for our primary publication, ScienceOpen Research, we do not obtain or report the JIF. We provide article-level metrics and a range of other article aspects that provide and enhance the context of each article, and extend this to all 25 million research articles on our platform.

Further reading

A simple proposal for the publication of journal citation distributions (link)

How can academia kick its addiction to the impact factor (link)

In:  Other  

Hassle-free indexing at ScienceOpen!

This post announces a call for journals that are Open Access and also charge no APCs (article-processing charges) to apply for our next-generation abstracting and indexing services on ScienceOpen for free!

Free to publish Open Access journals offer an incredible service to the research community and broader public, with editors often working long hours with no compensation. We want to recognise this effort and reward it with free indexing on our platform!

More visibility for your journal

Journals indexed on ScienceOpen:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

What do we need from you?

An application form can be found here. Fill it out, and submit to our team. Simple!

On the last day of every month, we will select and announce the winners via social media, and begin the next cycle! Out of the applicants, we will select up to 10 journals per month for free indexing, and the best application will get a free featured journal collection too! All others will roll over into the next month.

Continue reading “Hassle-free indexing at ScienceOpen!”  

In:  About SO  

Cool new features at ScienceOpen

At ScienceOpen, we’re constantly upgrading our platform to provide the best possible user interaction experience. We get feedback from the research community all the time, and try to adapt to best meet their needs.

So today, we’re happy to announce two neat little features in our latest updates.

Firstly, all Open Access articles now have a cute little symbol next to them, making it even easier for you to discover open content. This shows up on all of our Open Access content across nearly 14 million article records now. Making open content stand out is a great way to encourage others to adopt open practices, as well as help people see which content they can re-use most easily.

New features 1

As well as this, we have a new browsing function built into our collections. Sometimes, collections are pretty big. Our new SciELO collections have some with tens of thousands of open access articles, and sifting through that manually is not exactly a valuable use of ones time.

New features 2

With this new function, you can now filter content within collections by journal, publisher, keywords, and even filter them by citations or Altmetric scores. Discovering content relevant to your research should be smart and efficient, and this is what our platform delivers. Try it out on this collection, or build your own!

Do you have any comments or feedback at your experiences with ScienceOpen? Let us know! Contact Jon.Tennant@scienceopen.com

In:  Other  

Why ‘context’ is important for research

Context is something we’ve been thinking a lot about at ScienceOpen recently. It comes from the Latin ‘con’ and ‘texere’ (to form ‘contextus’), which means ‘weave together’. The implications for science are fairly obvious: modern research is about weaving together different strands of information, thought, and data to place your results into the context of existing research. This is the reason why we have introductory and discussion sections at the intra-article level.

But what about context at a higher level?

Context can defined as: “The circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood.” Simple follow on questions might be then, what is the context of a research article? How do we define that context? How do we build on that to do science more efficiently? The whole point for the existence of research articles is that they can be understood by as broad an audience as possible so that their re-use is maximised.

There are many things that impinge upon the context of research. Paywalls, secretive and exclusive peer review, lack of discovery, lack of inter-operability, lack of accessibility. The list is practically endless, and a general by-product of a failure for traditional scholarly publishing models to embrace a Web-based era.

Continue reading “Why ‘context’ is important for research”  

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