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In:  Announcements  

Boost your open citations with our new article request feature

Missing an article or citation from ScienceOpen, or want to add more of your own publications? Users can now request articles to be integrated into our database via their dashboard. These can be your own articles, or someone else’s – the choice is yours!

All we need are either a list of:

  • CrossRef DOIs
  • DOAJ IDs
  • PubMed IDs

Simply upload a file or copy and paste them in, click the button and away you go! We’ll send you a notification by email to let you know the status of each article. We’ll work our magic behind the scenes and integrate your selection as soon as is computationally possible.

Find this feature on your user dashboard.

Boost your citations

One of the great things about this new feature is that you can add a list of DOIs of articles that cite your own work. We provide a free and open citation network for each of our users, based on extracting citation data from peer reviewed publications. Thanks to initiatives like I4OC, it is becoming easier to provide enriched citation information like we do for researchers for free.

To find your Dashboard, click on the My ScienceOpen tab at the top!

By adding research that cites your work, we provide an easy and great way to make sure that your citation profile is complete! This isn’t gaming the system, it’s simply making it comprehensive and open. That’s important. Put this in the context of our recently launched author-metrics, and you’re on to a winning academic profile!

For collection editors

If you have a collection at ScienceOpen, you can specify that these records be automatically integrated into them. You can add these in bulk, with 100 DOIs per request for now. Personalising your collections and making them complete has never been easier! If you want to set up your own collection and try out these features, contact us here!

Integration and validation

By using the new ‘claim authorship’ feature, your articles will be directly integrated with your ScienceOpen profile and ORCID. This provides crucial cross-validation of your research history, a unique feature of ScienceOpen. If you’re adding you own article records, these will be available in your ‘Claim your articles’ section of the Dashboard, where you can easily add them to your profile.

Collecting and Connecting with ORCID!

We recognise that no research database is complete, and ScienceOpen is no exception. We work closely with publishers, ORCID, and platforms like PubMed to integrate new content on a daily basis. But we can’t pick up everything, and that’s where you come in!

By adding personalised content, you help us to fill in the blank spots in our database. This helps to enrich our network by putting this content into our semantically linked network.  We are currently only indexing research articles and not book chapters, proceedings or other content types.

So pop over to your dashboard, try it out, and let us know what you think!

Taking Open Access Beyond Articles and Institutes

In the current ecosystem of scholarly communication, effective infrastructures for the responsible and open dissemination of intellectual output are an inevitability, especially for research institutions.

Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH is one of the biggest research institutes in Europe with about 5,900 employees and publishes its own open access journals.

At ScienceOpen, we are always looking for ways to help maximize the visibility of institutional research output. Today, we are happy to announce that the two Forschungszentrum Jülich open access journals, Journal of large-scale research facilities and Collective Dynamics, are now indexed on ScienceOpen. Here we have compiled a brief description of both journals.

Instruments with DOIs: Journal of large-scale research facilities

The Journal of large-scale research facilities allows large-scale equipment to be cited properly by assigning DOIs to the articles describing them. It covers large-scale equipment from all scientific disciplines and is also mostly intended for use by scientists not affiliated to the institution operating the facilities (dedicated user operation). Furthermore, it provides operators of large-scale research facilities with the opportunity to describe their equipment. In order to keep the focus on the facilities themselves, all articles are published in the name of the operating institution (corporate author). There are now descriptions of more than 120 large-scale facilities from the Helmholtz Association, the large scientific organization of which Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH is a member.

Among the facilities covered by the journal are:

  • MARIA, the magnetic reflectometer with high incident angle
  • RESEDA, the resonance spin echo spectrometer
  • MEPHISTO, a facility for particle physics with cold neutrons
  • TOFTOF, the cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer
  • GALAXI, the gallium anode low-angle x-ray instrument
  • BALU, the largest autoclave research facility in the world
Dr. Wolfgang Häußler shows RESEDA on a lab course at Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (source).

Make them citable

Assigning DOIs (digital object identifiers) to research facilities and integrating them into the common system of linking scholarly references makes them:

  • Easier to find, cite, link, and identify.
  • Easier to track their usage and trace research networks to the facility it is used by.
  • Easier to track their evaluations and assess their impact.

Additional benefits include:

  • Users of the facilities can cite the equipment unambiguously in their publications with the aid of the article.
  • An additional benefit for users is that they do not need to repeat the description of the instrument in each of their papers.

Research on the crossroads and beyond: Collective Dynamics

The peer-reviewed open access journal Collective Dynamics publishes the latest innovations in the fields of pedestrian dynamics, crowds, vehicular traffic, and other systems of self-driven particles, such as molecular motors, animal groups, or agents. Articles are written in a way that makes them accessible to a wide range of scientific disciplines.

They reveal:

Shibuya crossing

Being indexed on ScienceOpen will help these journals to reach out to readers and to gain maximum visibility and re-use of the articles.

To learn more about indexing on ScienceOpen, contact us here.

 

In:  Announcements  

Review any of 1.3million+ OA articles on the ScienceOpen platform – receive a DOI so your contribution can be found and cited

Image credit: International Health Academy
Image credit: International Health Academy

At ScienceOpen, the research + publishing network, we’re enjoying some of the upsides of being the new kid on the Open Access (OA) block. Innovation and building on the experiments of others is easier when there’s less to lose but we are also the first to admit that life as a start-up is not for the faint hearted!

In the years since user generated comments and reviews were first introduced, those of us who strive to improve research communication have wrestled with questions such as: potential for career damage; content for peer and public audiences; comments from experts, everyone or a mix and lower than anticipated participation.

We want to acknowledge the many organizations who have done a tremendous job at showing different paths forward in this challenging space. Now it’s our turn to try.

Since launch, ScienceOpen has assigned members different user privileges based on their previous publishing history as verified by their ORCID ID. This seemed like a reasonable way to measure involvement in the field and provided the right level of publishing experience to understand the pitfalls of the process. This neat diagram encapsulates how it works.

Scientific and Expert Members of ScienceOpen can review all the content on the site which includes 1.3million+ OA articles and a very small number of our own articles (did we mention, we’re new!).

All reviews require a four point assessment (using five stars) of the level of: importance, validity, completeness and comprehensibility and there’s space to introduce and summarize the material. Inline annotation captures reviewer feedback during reading. Next up in the site release cycle, mechanisms to make it easy for authors to respond to in-line observations.

In a move sure to please busy researchers tired of participating without recognition, each review, including the subsequent dialogue, receives a Digital Object Identified (DOI) so that others can find and cite the analysis and the contribution becomes a registered part of the scientific debate.

Welcome to our wonderful world of Reviewing! Please share your feedback here or @Science_Open.