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New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

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To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for.

Martin Paul Eve, Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London and a CEO of the Open Library of Humanities said: “we have been delighted by the response of the linguistics community to the launch of Glossa. The study of language, across cultures, is an area in which open access makes eminent sense. By including these collections in ScienceOpen we hope to assist with the discoverability of this material and to ensure the broadest audience for the study of linguistics.”

The latest research presented in ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ includes an investigation of an understudied type of RTO construction in the Philippine-type Austronesian language Puyuma in ‘The raising-to-object construction in Puyuma and its implications for a typology of RTO’; a discussion on the use of big corpuses or databases as a first step for qualitative analysis of linguistic data in ‘Exploiting microvariation: How to make your best with incomplete data’; a focused analysis of subject extraction in Māori, the indigenous Polynesian language of New Zealand, in ‘Māori subject extraction’; an experiment to determine the extent to which concept pre-activation and the function of the definite and indefinite article affect referent activation during retrieval and integration as well as referent activation at the sentence level in ‘A Dual-Process Activation Model: Processing definiteness and information status’; and, among others, a thorough theoretical investigation of the sign language phenomenon in ‘The syntax of sign language agreement: Common ingredients, but unusual recipe’.

In addition to diverse scholarship in ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’, ScienceOpen now indexes research on Portuguese linguistics and scientific study of phonological and phonetic aspects of language in the form of  featured collections ‘Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’ and ‘Laboratory Phonology’.

Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’ is concerned with all branches of linguistics and aims at publishing high-quality papers in the field of Portuguese linguistics, including the comparison between any varieties of Portuguese and any other language(s). This English-language online journal welcomes contributions from linguists in all countries, and from different linguistic theories and frameworks, including theoretically oriented work, comparative work, experimental studies, and interdisciplinary contributions.

Laboratory Phonology’ is the official open access journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology. It publishes reports on the scientific study of all phonological/phonetic aspects of spoken and signed language through scholarly exchange across disciplines, including all domains of linguistics (phonology, phonetics, syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics), as well as from related disciplines, including psychology, speech & hearing science, communication science, computer science, electrical & computer engineering, and other related fields.

ScienceOpen and the Open Library of Humanities believe that ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’, ‘Journal of Portuguese Linguistics’, and ‘Laboratory Phonology’ will be a great asset to all users interested in linguistics, accommodating a range of research topics in this field. We invite you to browse, discuss, and engage with our three new collections of peer-reviewed, open access articles through the many tools available on the ScienceOpen interactive platform.

New featured collection: Trace Elements and Electrolytes

Ever wondered about the relationship between mental strain and Magnesium loss? Or questioned whether there is more to transdermal absorption of magnesium than make-believe? Maybe you have heard that effort, performance, and recreation need can be predicted by metabolic markers including electrolytes?  If you would like to find answers to the many questions related to trace elements and electrolytes, look no further than the brand new online collection of articles published by Dustri-Verlag on ScienceOpen: Trace Elements and Electrolytes.

ScienceOpen and Dustri-Verlag, a German publishing house specializing in medical literature, are happy to announce that the first 39 articles from Dustri’s international English-language journal Trace Elements and Electrolytes have found a new form of representation in the collection of the same name. Embedded in the ScienceOpen platform, you can filter these articles by publication date, title, discipline and much more, as well as sort your results by Altmetric score, view count, citations, date, relevance, and rating.

Dustri’s Trace Elements and Electrolytes is a quarterly journal that publishes reviews and editorials, original papers, short communications, and reports on recent advances in the entire field of trace elements. This journal accepts papers on experimental findings if they bear a close relationship to human diseases. It also publishes correspondence (letters to editors) and current information, including book announcements. Managed by Jörg Feistle, Trace Elements and Electrolytes is the official organ of “Society of Magnesium Research”, Germany, and the German Working Group “Trace Elements and Electrolytes in Radiation Oncology” AKTE Germany.

ScienceOpen and Dustri-Verlag believe that Trace Elements and Electrolytes, a collection of carefully curated peer-reviewed scientific articles, will be helpful to all researchers studying trace elements and electrolytes. We invite you to discuss and engage with its diverse content through the many tools our interactive platform has to offer or to help spread the word on social media about scientific topics such as Boron’s potentially essential role in the metabolism of the connective tissue of the biological bone matrix, the role of serum zinc and copper levels in predicting malignancy in differentiated thyroid cancers, or how the levels of homocysteine and zinc could be an important parameter in the follow-up of hypertension.

Interview with Advisory Board member Peter Suber

As a newcomer on the Open Access publishing scene, ScienceOpen relies on the support of a wide range of academics. With this interview we would like to profile Advisory Board member Peter Suber (http://bit.ly/petersuber ) and share the valuable perspective he brings to our organization.

One of the original founders of the Open Access movement, Peter Suber is currently director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication ( https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/ ) and the Harvard Open Access Project ( http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/hoap ). His latest book, Continue reading “Interview with Advisory Board member Peter Suber”  

ScienceOpen Editorial Board: Anthony Atala, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

The Editorial Board is at the heart of any publishing project. In this interview series, ScienceOpen would like to highlight some of the scientists who are supporting us as members of the editorial board and their reasons for getting involved in the Open Access movement. We’re delighted to welcome expert member Anthony Atala, M.D ( http://goo.gl/ynLgGq ) – Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the W. H. Boyce Professor and Chair of the Department of Urology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center – to our Research + Publishing Network .
Anthony is an Continue reading “ScienceOpen Editorial Board: Anthony Atala, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine”  

ScienceOpen Author Interview Series – Lorenzo Iorio

ScienceOpen continues our series of interviews with our new authors with Professor Lorenzo Iorio (https://www.scienceopen.com/profile/lorenzo_iorio ), who has just published an article on ScienceOpen entitled „Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system.“ ( http://goo.gl/kCYgwd )

Professor Iorio is a physicist working in the field of general relativity and gravitation. He has published over 180 articles and holds a permanent position at the Continue reading “ScienceOpen Author Interview Series – Lorenzo Iorio”  

Give the pioneers a chance – OA and closing the reputational gap for young scientists.

The last time I attended a panel discussion on scholarly publishing, I realized that a significant part of the audience were Ph.D. students or post-docs. When one of the speakers talked about new opportunities in Open Access publishing, a very intensive discussion began. Almost all young scientists in the audience were excited and motivated by the principles and vision behind Open Access. They said they would like to change Continue reading “Give the pioneers a chance – OA and closing the reputational gap for young scientists.”  

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Open Access in Physics: Do we need something outside the arXiv?

Over the last few days I attended the Spring Meeting of the German Physical Society (DPG) in Berlin. Physicists are considered sometime as a very special species among scientists, and not only because the characters introduced in the “Big Bang Theory” sitcom. Physicists developed the World Wide Web in the late eighties which became the starting point for all internet activities today. In 1991 Paul Ginsparg started to post preprints of research articles in a repository at Los Alamos National Laboratory which is known as “arXiv” ( www.arXiv.org ) which now consists of more than Continue reading “Open Access in Physics: Do we need something outside the arXiv?”