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Tag: Journals

Rewarding Open Access publishing with ScienceOpen

After several highly successful rounds of our free indexing competition (see here and here), we are pleased to announce a further 6 new journals will be added in the New Year, along with the 12 new publishing clients we recently added!

These journals are:

  1. Basic and Clinical Neuroscience (link)
  2. Health in Emergencies & Disasters Quarterly (HDQ) (with a promotional free collection) (link)
  3. Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies (link)
  4. Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology (JACIT) (link)
  5. Frattura ed Integrità Strutturale (Fracture and Structural Integrity) (link)
  6. Journal of Applied and Computational Mechanics (link)
Individual journals now come with their own highly-appealing set of re-use metrics.

Publishers working with ScienceOpen benefit from increased visibility, usage and branding for their indexed content. By getting indexed on ScienceOpen, you:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

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In:  About SO  

Enhanced journal pages at ScienceOpen

In case you missed it, to kick off the New Year we redesigned our search interface and made it more powerful and useful in a range of ways. You don’t even have to sign up to take advantage of our advanced search and discovery functions with metrics about your favorite journals and publishers.

Journal upgrades

One of our favourite upgrades is how each of more than 24,000 journals are featured and displayed. Now it is possible for anyone to see what journals exist on our platform and how many articles are tracked for each one of them. That’s the first step. Try searching for your favourite journal, or even a journal you work for, and seeing what we have for it.

24,000 journals, arranged by how much content we have indexed from each on our platform.

Continue reading “Enhanced journal pages at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Aggregation  

Platinum indexing for platinum journals

Thank you to everyone who applied for the latest round of ScienceOpen’s free indexing competition! Following the major success of the first round, we are pleased to announce that we will be offering free abstracting and indexing services for the following journals:

  1. Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage
  2. Open Access Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
  3. Anti-Trafficking Review
  4. Path of Science

We also decided that one journal deserves a special free promotional journal collection: Anti-Trafficking Review. Congratulations!

Free to publish OA journals offer an incredible service to the research community and broader public, with editors often working long hours with little-no compensation. We want to recognise this effort and reward it with free indexing on our platform! But why should journal editors care?

More visibility for your journal

Journals indexed on ScienceOpen:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

To apply for the next round, an application form can be found here. Fill it out, and submit to our team. Simple, and hassle free!

 

In:  Peer Review  

Peer review at ScienceOpen is surprisingly simple!

 

Peer review at ScienceOpen is all about post-publication*. Along with nearly 12 million full text Open Access (OA) articles and article records, we also have the original publications from our journal ScienceOpen Research. Of these, the vast majority have 2-3 peer reviews each, thanks to a mighty effort from our Editorial office in Berlin.

But did you know that anyone can review any article they want on ScienceOpen, and not just those from ScienceOpen Research? And perhaps more importantly, anyone can invite anyone else to review any article? That sounds an awful lot like the daytime job for Editors at traditional journals.. But with the power firmly in the hand of researchers and their communities. How cool is that?

Step 1
Step 1

It’s super easy to implement too. All you have to do is go to an article of choice, click the ‘Reviews’ button (Step 1), and then select the ‘Invite to Review’ button (Step 2). If you were feeling inclined, you could review the paper yourself too!

You can then simply select their ScienceOpen username (what, you don’t have one yet?!), or invite them by email (Step 3).

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Open science stars: An interview with Dr. Gal Schkolnik

Last week, we kicked off a series interviewing some of the top ‘open ​scientists’ by interviewing Dr. Joanne Kamens of Addgene, and had a look at some of the great work she’d been doing in promoting a culture of data sharing, and equal opportunity for researchers. Today, we’re bringing you another open science star, Dr. Gal Schkolnik, who recently published a really cool Collection with us on the bacterium Shewanella. Here’s her story!

Hi Gal! So can you tell us a bit about your research background, and how you originally got interested in science?

I did my BSc in Chemistry at the Tel Aviv University and my MSc at the Weizmann Institute, analyzing  the chemical composition of deforestation-fire smoke from the Amazon, where farmers and corporations yearly set hectares of rainforest on fire for agriculture and pasture. For my PhD at the Technische Universitaet Berlin I measured the electric fields at protein surfaces and self-assembled monolayers. Now I’m researching Shewanella, an electroactive bacterium that can transfer electrons across its outer membrane. As you can see, I always start on a completely new field, because my greatest passion in life is acquiring knowledge – so learning something new is my favorite kind of challenge. I’m basically just a kid who never got over the “why” stage, haha. Plus I had some very inspiring teachers at school – two wonderful women who nurtured my natural tendency to go deep in pursuit of answers to the hardest questions.

People who have no access to journal subscriptions can use ScienceOpen to gain more knowledge about electroactive bacteria and their possible applications.

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In:  Other  

Collections as the future of academic-led journals

ScienceOpen Collections are thematic groups of research articles that transcend journals and publishers to transform how we collate and build upon scientific knowledge.

What are Collections

The modern research environment is a hyper-dimensional space with a vast quantity of outputs that are impossible to manually manage. You can think of research like a giant Rubik’s cube: you have different ‘colours’ of research that you have to mix and match and play around with to discover how the different sections fit together to become something useful.

CC BY-SA 3.0,  Booyabazooka (Wikipedia)
CC BY-SA 3.0, Booyabazooka (Wikipedia)

We view Collections as the individual faces of a Rubik’s cube. They draw from the vast, and often messy, pool of published research to provide an additional layer of context and clarity. They represent a new way for researchers to filter the published record to discover and curate content that is directly relevant to them, irrespective of who published it or what journal it appears in.

Advantages of Collections

Perhaps the main advantage of Collections to researchers is that they are independent of journals or publishers and their branding criteria. Researchers are undoubtedly the best-placed to assess what research is relevant to themselves and their communities. As such, we see Collections as the natural continuing transformation of the concept of the modern journal, acting in almost full cycle to return them to their basic principles.

The advantage of using Collections is that they provide researchers with the power to filter and select from the published record and create what is in essence a highly-specialised virtual journal. This means that Collections are not pre-selective, but instead comprise papers discriminated only by a single criterion: research that is relevant to your peers, and also deemed relevant by them.

Filtering for Collections occurs at different levels depending on scope or complexity of research. For example, Collections can be designed to focus on different research topics, lab groups or research groups, communities, or even departments or institutions. Collections can also be created for specific conferences and include posters from these, published on ScienceOpen. You define the scope and the selection criteria.

Continue reading “Collections as the future of academic-led journals”