Blog
About

Open Science Resources on ScienceOpen

Photo credit: ‘Unlock’, Thomas Ulrich, Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

ScienceOpen has been committed to making science open from its onset. Some of our latest projects in realizing this commitment have been launching the ‘UCL Open: Environment‘ megajournal, contextualizing the new open access journal ‘BMJ Open Science’ into the ScienceOpen research discovery environment of 53 million article records, and offering some ideas on how you can contribute to open science in small but significant ways.

In light of the 6th Open Science Conference organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science in Berlin this week, we decided to give you an overview of some of the most relevant and diverse research content on open science curated in the form of researcher-led collections on ScienceOpen. Our research recommendations below discuss some of the most pertinent issues in open science, such as the FAIR data principles, reproducible research, metadata, and open access scholarship. Enjoy!

Continue reading “Open Science Resources on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”