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Promote your conference at ScienceOpen

‘Emerging Alberta Deep Basin Early Cretaceous Tight Plays: Results from Field Mapping of Wilrich and Lower (Basal) Fahler Strata, Spirit River Formation, Grande Cache, Alberta’ – a poster on ScienceOpen

Organizing a conference this year? Publishing posters and proceedings on ScienceOpen is a low-cost alternative that puts your conference output in the context of over 50 million article records, with smart search and filtering tools and interactive features for the research community.

Posters are an effective way to communicate the essence of a research project in a compact space. They provide an opportunity to present preliminary results and get feedback from the scientific community before publishing. ScienceOpen has been publishing posters open access for years with over 170 posters on the platform. Now with an easy upload function, integration with ORCID and Crossref, and a full spectrum of usage metrics from citations to Altmetric Score, ScienceOpen offers a state-of-the-art platform for your conference. Users can bookmark their favourite posters, review, add comments, share to social media, recommend them to their peers, and cite. 

Continue reading “Promote your conference at ScienceOpen”  

ScienceOpen and IET partnership highlights power engineering research

For the official press release, please see our Press Room, Knowledgespeak, and Information Today.

ScienceOpen and the IET (The Institution of Engineering and Technology) are pleased to announce a partnership that integrates selected Open Access articles from IET’s power and energy journals in the ScienceOpen research discovery environment in the form of a featured collection.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen and IET partnership highlights power engineering research”  

UCL’s innovative open access megajournal starts taking submissions

For the official press release, please see our Press Room, UCL News, and Science|Business.  

UCL Press has launched its new open access megajournal ‘UCL Open’ and will start accepting academic research submissions from today (January 31, 2019).

It is the first university megajournal providing an open access and transparent end to end publishing model, enabling research to be accessible to everyone.

It is being piloted with UCL Open: Environment which focuses on environment-related research and will include contributions from life and earth sciences, as well as medical, physical, population, engineering, and social sciences. The model is expected to be developed and rolled out across a broad range of multidisciplinary research subjects.

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Kicking off the new year with 50 million article records!

Image by Epic Fireworks, Flickr, CC BY

We made it! ScienceOpen reached a major milestone: 50 million article records in 5 years of making science open! What’s more, this number is increasing faster and faster as we index more articles. ScienceOpen’s aggregation engine enables us to track citation genealogies and identify similar publications from published articles, making it possible to exponentially push the boundaries of our research discovery environment.

To mark our successful 5-year journey to 50 million records, ScienceOpen CEO Stephanie Dawson talks about the meaning of this milestone for ScienceOpen’s future and scholarly communication in general.

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New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

Source: pixabay.com

To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading “New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”  

The British Journal of Pharmacy joins ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Adrian Scottow, Pharmacy, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce a partnership with the University of Huddersfield Press, a primarily open access publisher of high quality research, to promote the British Journal of Pharmacy – a new featured collection of scientific articles in pharmaceutical sciences.

British Journal of Pharmacy is an online, peer-reviewed, open access journal with no article processing charges (APCs). This publication is a product of University of Huddersfield Press’ mission to improve access to scholarly work for the benefit of all by publishing innovative research as open access. The journal publishes research on the latest developments in pharmacy in the form of scholarly papers and critical reviews. Submissions can be accepted from a wide range of pharmaceutical sciences including, among others: pharmacy, molecular pharmacy, drug delivery and targeting, pharmacoeconomics, pharmacokinetics and therapeutics, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry, pharmacovigilance, and innovations in teaching pharmacy.

University Press & Marketing Manager, Megan Taylor, said “The University of Huddersfield Press aims to improve access to scholarly research for all – we are looking forward to working with ScienceOpen to make our innovative research available to even wider audiences.” Continue reading “The British Journal of Pharmacy joins ScienceOpen”  

In:  About SO  

How can you search on ScienceOpen?

Source: pixabay.com

 

 

ScienceOpen has a myriad of features and filters to help you navigate through the 47 million records published on our platform. How many of them are you familiar with? Our customized search engine enables users to quickly find articles they are looking for. Familiarizing yourself with our easily accessible features can save you time on the technicalities. For example, did you know that you can save and export any search results or filter articles for preprints?

 

 

Filters

Open Access
If are interested in Open Access (OA) publications on ScienceOpen, you can easily filter your search to return only those results. Simply click on ‘Add Filter’ below the search(box), then click on ‘Open Access’ and hit the ‘Search’ button. Your results now include exclusively OA records.

Continue reading “How can you search on ScienceOpen?”  

In:  About SO  

What can a Researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Image by Steve Rainwater, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen provides researchers with a wide range of tools to support their research – all for free. Here is a short checklist to make sure you are getting the most of the technological infrastructure and content that we have to offer. What can a researcher do on ScienceOpen?

Discover

  • Multi-dimensional search in millions of article records for quick orientation: Filter your search by 18 filters including open access, preprint, author, affiliation, keyword, content type, source, and more. Sort your results by Altmetric score, citations, date, usage, and rating. Use the article Collections by other researchers to help narrow your search.
  • Export search results in EndNote, BibTex, and Reference Manager (RIS) formats for easy integration with other reference management systems. Up to 200 citations exported at a time.
  • Save your search to find the newest articles in your field with one click. ScienceOpen is adding thousands of articles to the database daily.
  • Bookmark the articles you are interested to explore later.

Continue reading “What can a Researcher do on ScienceOpen?”  

Read what you are looking for! ScienceOpen integrates more Open Access data

One of the biggest challenges for researchers is time. So when you find an abstract of interest and have just a moment to actually read, you need the full text right now. With our newest release, the ScienceOpen discovery environment incorporates open access data from Impactstory to provide researchers with more ways to read the paper.

Institutional repositories, open access aggregators, self-archiving, preprint servers – the last years have seen a proliferation of access options. The new ScienceOpen article page, therefore, aims for transparency and choice on nearly 40 million article records.

ScienceOpen is excited to work with the Unpaywall data from Impactstory to provide more information about open access licenses and access options for our users. This powerful dataset is being used by several discovery engines to enrich the search experience. Jason Priem of Impactstory says, “we’re thrilled to welcome ScienceOpen as our latest partner to integrate Unpaywall data, and excited about how this new integration furthers our goal to make Open Access content truly ubiquitous for researchers and readers.”

Potsdamer Platz Berlin, Andreas Levers, Traffic Light, Flickr, CC BY-NC

A green light for reading

The publisher’s version of record is a reader’s most reliable source. With our latest release we highlight this version on the article page with a green “Publisher” button for better orientation. Editors and publishers work hard to make the most accurate version of research results available to the community and changes to the version of record are often tracked on the publisher website via Crossref’s Crossmark service. With so little time in the day, reading the original is your best bet.

However, if further freely-accessible versions are available according to data from Unpaywall, these links are also provided and clearly labelled. Repository versions can be helpful outside of academic settings. And sometimes we have not identified an Open Access license, but Unpaywall has – so we, of course, want to give the reader this information as well!

If ScienceOpen indexing is based on the full text XML available on our platform (Open Access Hosting customers or PubMed Central Open Access articles), then the ScienceOpen access button is highlighted green. The same is true if we are getting our indexing information from SciELO. Our goal is always to help users find the best version for their needs.

“By offering more access choices, ScienceOpen has become so much more useful for researchers,” said Nina Tscheke, who has been involved in research community outreach over the past year. “This is an important step towards meeting researchers needs.”

ScienceOpen continues to develop tools and features for researchers and publishers to provide a superior discovery environment for scholarly research. If you are a publisher, editor, society or institute, talk to us today about our platform technology. Contact Stephanie Dawson for more information.

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