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Tag: Open Access

In:  Announcements  
Open Access in the Cause of Social Clinical Health Support

Open Access in the Cause of Social Clinical Health Support

Today we’re happy to announce that the Open Access journal Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention is now available on ScienceOpen!

The journal was established by the International Scientific Group of Applied Preventive Medicine I-GAP Vienna, Austria in 2010. Their three-pronged commitment was to find solutions to the current demands in social work practice, to help clinical social work students to fully develop their knowledge, skills and qualification, and to foster dialogue between social workers, doctors and teachers. This resulted in an open, independent exchange forum covering topics from Social Work, Psychology and other Social Sciences. Although theoretical concepts and suggestions are also part of the professional discussion, the journal is strongly practice-oriented and shares case-studies, reports and problem-solving strategies for issues such as healthcare ethics, family policies, unemployment  or infectious diseases such as hepatitis or AIDS. The aim of supporting new generations is also represented in that students are encouraged to share their experiences and as such to add a fresh spirit to the value of the journal.

Continue reading “Open Access in the Cause of Social Clinical Health Support”  

In:  Announcements  
Medieval heritage unlimited

Medieval heritage unlimited

A colorful addition to our Humanities section: Magnificat Cultura i Literatura Medievals, an open-access, double-blind peer-reviewed yearbook on medieval culture and literature as well as digital humanities is now available on ScienceOpen. Distinguishing features are:

  • The multilingual character of the journal since it accepts works in numerous languages. Hitherto the majority of articles were written in English, Spanish and Catalan, but all abstracts are available in English.
  • Due to its digital format and annual publication frequency the journal favors articles longer than the usual standard (the longest one is a 267 page thorough study from Jaume J. Chiner Gimeno updating the biographical records of the writer Joan Roís de Corella (1435-1497)). This is especially beneficial in the case of such a textology & philology oriented field as medieval studies, where in many cases space constraints impede the sharing of authentic texts or data in full length. Eliminating this obstacle, the journal aims to give forth longer texts, manuscripts and literary texts, critical editions or biographical data which are well-deserved to be openly published.
  • The journal puts special emphasis on medievalism and the maintenance of medieval heritage by means of facilitating exchange on digitization projects.
  • Magnificat CLM is strongly committed to Open Access values and collaboration for boundless research.

The high quality of articles as well as meticulous editing is guaranteed by the prestigious editorial team from the Universitat de València.

The third volume is a hot release from 9 December. Diving into the issue, you can read about a Renaissance love story, on the early reception of Dante in Catalan culture, on the intriguing epigraphic inscriptions of Lara (of the famous infantes), on a critical edition of several mythological Corellan proses and finally, on the importance of ekphrasis in Ramon Llull’s writings.

Did we whet your appetite? Leave your comments on ScienceOpen!

In:  About SO  

Enhanced article context at ScienceOpen

As part of our ongoing development of ScienceOpen 2.017, we have designed an exciting and most importantly, pretty, new context-enhanced webpage for each of our 27 million article records. Such enriched article metadata is becoming increasingly important in defining the context of research in the evolution of scholarly communication, in which we are moving away from journal- to article-level evaluation.

Statistically significant upgrades

All of the statistics have been moved to the top of the page, including the number of page views or readers, the Altmetric score, the number of recommendations, and the number of social media shares.

Source

Newly featured statistics include the top references cited within, the top articles citing that paper, and the number of similar articles based on keywords and topics. These new features are great for authors as content creators, researchers as users, as well as publishers for understanding the popularity and context of research they publish.

Continue reading “Enhanced article context at ScienceOpen”  

In:  Other  

Welcome to ScienceOpen version 2.017

Kick off the new year with the new unified search on ScienceOpen! We have accomplished a lot over the last year and are looking forward to supporting the academic community in 2017.

In 2016 ScienceOpen brought you more context: Now your search comes with a new analytics bar that breaks down your search results by collections, journals, publishers, disciplines, and keywords for quicker filtering. Try a search for the pressing topics of 2016 like Zika or CRISPR and take the new features for a spin.

Researcher output, journal content, reference lists, citing articles can all be dynamically sorted and explored via Altmetric score, citations, date, activity. Statistics for journals, publishers and authors give overview of the content that we are indexing on ScienceOpen. Check out the most relevant journals on ScienceOpen, for example BMC Infectious Diseases or PloS Genetics for a new perspective. Or add your publications to your ORCID and get a dynamic view of your own output.

Image by Epic Fireworks, Flickr, CC BY

In 2016 ScienceOpen brought you more content: We welcomed publisher customers across the entire spectrum of disciplines to ScienceOpen and expect many more for the upcoming year. We added multiple journals from Brill, River Publishers, Open Library of Humanities, Higher Education Press and featured collections for PeerJ Computer Science, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Molecular Case Studies and the Italian Society for Victimology. We had the pleasure to work with a very diverse group, from STM to HSS, from open access to subscription-based journals, creating interdisciplinary bridges and new connections for their content. We further integrated all of SciELO on ScienceOpen this year for a more global perspective and have had a great time working with them. We are at over 27 million article records and adding content every day.

In 2016 ScienceOpen brought you more open: The ScienceOpen team participated in and helped organize numerous community events promoting Open Science. From Peer Review Week to OpenCon, talks at SSP in Vancouver and SpotOn in London, our team was on the road, debating hot issues in scholarly communication.

In order to bring more visibility to smaller community open access journals, very often with close to non-existent funding and run on a voluntary basis, we launched our platinum indexing competition. It was geared towards open access journals charging no APCs to their authors. Four successful rounds in, we have selected 18 journals to be indexed and awarded some of them with special featured collections on the ScienceOpen platform. This activity was particularly rewarding as we heard back from journals’ editors expressing their enthusiasm about the ScienceOpen project and enjoying bigger usage numbers on their content.

The ScienceOpen 2.017 version will continue to focus on context, content and open science. We are your starting point for academic discovery and networking. Together let’s explore new ways to support visibility for your publications, promote peer review, improve search and discovery and facilitate collection building. Here is to putting research in context! The year 2016 had some great moments – may 2017 bring many, many more!

Your ScienceOpen team

In:  About SO  

ScienceOpen launches new search capabilities

At ScienceOpen, we’ve just upgraded our search and discovery platform to be faster, smarter, and more efficient. A new user interface and filtering capabilities provide a better discovery experience for users. ScienceOpen searches more than 27 million full text open access or article metadata records and puts them in context. We include peer-reviewed academic articles from all fields, including pre-prints that we draw from the arXiv and which are explicitly tagged as such.

The current scale of academic publishing around the world is enormous. According to a recent STM report, we currently publish around 2.5 million new peer reviewed articles every single year, and that’s just in English language journals.

The problem with this for researchers and more broadly is how to stay up to date with newly published research. And not just in our own fields, but in related fields too. Researchers are permanently inundated, and we need to find a way to sift the wheat from the chaff.

The solution is smart and enhanced search and discovery. Platforms like ResearchGate and Google Scholar (GS) have just a single layer of discovery, with additional functions such as sorting by date to help narrow things down a bit. GS is the de facto mode of discovery of primary research for most academics, but it also contains a whole slew of ‘grey literature’ (i.e., non-peer reviewed outputs), which often interferes with finding the best research.

As well as this, if you do a simple search with GS, say just for dinosaurs, you get 161,000 returned results. How on Earth are you supposed to find the most useful and most relevant research based on this if you want to move beyond Google’s page rank, especially if you’re entering this from outside the area of specialisation? Simply narrowing down by dates does very little to prevent being overwhelmed with an absolute deluge of maybe maybe-not relevant literature. We need to do better at research discovery.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen launches new search capabilities”  

Prof. Kamel Belhamel: “For the global south, Open Access is an opportunity in terms of innovation, the diffusion of knowledge and the emergence of new ideas.”

Continuing the highly successful Open Science Stars series, this round we’re honoured to bring you Prof. Kamel Belhamel, the recently appointed DOAJ Ambassador for North Africa. Here’s his story.

Hi Kamel, and thanks for joining us here! Could you start off by letting us know a little bit about your background?

Thank you for interviewing me Jon and congratulations on receiving your hard-earned doctoral degree. Best wishes for the future. (Ed: Thank you!! 🙂)

Image credit: Kamel Belhamel
Image credit: Kamel Belhamel

I am Kamel Belhamel, full Professor of Chemistry at the University of Bejaia, director of the Laboratory of Organic Materials and Editor in chief of Algerian Journal of Natural Products (E-ISSN: 2353-0391). I graduated in Chemistry at the University of Setif- Algeria and achieved my PhD at the same University in the field of Process Engineering and Chemistry of Materials. I have taken part to several international projects such as: Italian project, German – DAAD, French- Algerian framework programme CMEP and co-ordinator of several Algerian national research projects, CNEPRU, PNR). My scientific activity is focused on the chemistry of macrocycles; Solvent extraction of metal ions from ores and waste solutions; Extraction and study of chemical composition from plant extract; Electrodeposition of metals and alloys. I am author/co-author of 20 scientific papers in international scientific journals and more than 50 abstract books in national and international conferences. I was Supervisor of many Master’s and 11 PhD students. I am a member of the Scientific Committee of the Faculty of Technology, the Algerian Chemical Society, and Training Manager of Master of Science: pharmaceutical processes at the University of Bejaia. Recently, I was appointed as the DOAJ Ambassador for North Africa.

When did you first hear about open access/data/science? What were your initial thoughts?

I have heard about open access journals during my first scientific visit to Freie Universität, Berlin in 2000. When I selected an open access journal, Molecules, and edited by MDPI, in order to publish our research results, my friend, Prof. Rainer Ludwig, has refused to publish in this journal because, in this period it hadn’t obtained an impact factor and asked for high APCs (article-processing charges). One important element to keep in mind when discussing Open science, that this concept is very old. By the 12th century, Bejaia, my city was an important port and an open centre of science in the North Africa. The Italian mathematician Fibonacci (c. 1170 – c. 1250) has studied Arabic numerals and algebraic notation in Bejaia. He introduced these and modern mathematics into medieval Europe in his famous book Liber Abaci. Another influential North African Muslim thinker of the 14th century, Ibn Khaldun, has been extensively studied in the Western world with special interest. He has written a part of his famous Muqaddimah “Introduction” in Bejaia. This document, summarize his theories of the science of sociology, was the greatest legacy that he freely offered for all of humanity and the generations to come.

 

The bust of Ibn Khaldun  and the entrance door of the Casbah of Bejaia (built in 1154, place of learning for Ibn Khaldun , Fibonacci and other scientists). Image credit: Kamel Belhamel
The bust of Ibn Khaldun and the entrance door of the Casbah of Bejaia (built in 1154, place of learning for Ibn Khaldun , Fibonacci and other scientists). Image credit: Kamel Belhamel

You recently were appointed as the DOAJ Ambassador for North Africa – congratulations! What sort of activities does this role entail? Continue reading “Prof. Kamel Belhamel: “For the global south, Open Access is an opportunity in terms of innovation, the diffusion of knowledge and the emergence of new ideas.””  

In:  Aggregation  

Platinum indexing for platinum journals

Thank you to everyone who applied for the latest round of ScienceOpen’s free indexing competition! Following the major success of the first round, we are pleased to announce that we will be offering free abstracting and indexing services for the following journals:

  1. Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage
  2. Open Access Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
  3. Anti-Trafficking Review
  4. Path of Science

We also decided that one journal deserves a special free promotional journal collection: Anti-Trafficking Review. Congratulations!

Free to publish OA journals offer an incredible service to the research community and broader public, with editors often working long hours with little-no compensation. We want to recognise this effort and reward it with free indexing on our platform! But why should journal editors care?

More visibility for your journal

Journals indexed on ScienceOpen:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

To apply for the next round, an application form can be found here. Fill it out, and submit to our team. Simple, and hassle free!

 

New partnership with Cold Spring Harbor

 

At ScienceOpen we’re pleased to announce yet another new publishing partnership with Cold Spring Harbor. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is an internationally renowned publisher of books, journals, and electronic media, located on Long Island, New York, USA. Since 1933, it has helped to advance scientific knowledge in all areas of genetics and molecular biology, including cancer biology, plant science, bioinformatics, and neurobiology.

Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies is an open access, peer reviewed, international journal in the field of precision medicine. Anyone can now freely browse, sort, and peer review any content from the journal using our advanced discovery engine.

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Articles display scores from Altmetric, and like all other open access content on our platform display the little OA logo. Integrated into our existing corpus of 26 million articles and article records, Cold Spring Harbor content will be put into context through our citation and recommendation network.

For more information about our indexing services, please contact our Marketing Manager Agata Morka (agata.morka@scienceopen.com). We are still running our free indexing competition for APC-free open access journals, so get in touch if you qualify!

How to start an Open Science revolution! An interview with patient advocate, Graham Steel.

Continuing our Open Science Stars interview series, today we’re happy to bring to you Graham Steel, a relentless campaigner for all things Open!

Hi Graham, and thanks for joining us here! Could you start off by letting us know a little bit about your background?

For 25 years, my background (as in day job) was dealing with insurance claims for various insurers, legal firms and service providers. In my spare time as of around 2001, I became involved in research/science outreach and as of now, I would class myself as an open science enthusiast. From Jan 2015 – August 2016, I acted as Community Manager (then Social Media Manager) for ContentMine.

When did you first hear about open access/data/science? What were your initial thoughts?

In order, I first heard about open access late 2006, open science the following year and then open data. My initial thoughts were that all these entities were much needed and refreshing alternatives to all that I had seen or read about such topics up until then, i.e., closed access, prohibitive paywalls, “data not shown” etc.

You’re what some people call a ‘Patient Advocate’ – what is that, and what’s the story there?

The terms Patient Advocate and Patient Advocacy broadly speaking can mean a number of things. By definition, “Patient advocacy is an area of lay specialization in health care concerned with advocacy for patients, survivors, and carers”. For myself personally, this began in 2001 and mainly concerned bereaved relatives and then patients and their family members. See here for further details.

You relentlessly campaign for various aspects of open science – what drives you in this?

My means of background, I would say with certainty that during the period of around 2008 – 2011, the (sadly now deceased) social media aggregator site Friendfeed was the space in which the foundations for a lot of my current thinking were set out. Prior to that, having already been primed with open access and open data, that’s pretty much where open science really took off in earnest. Science and indeed research in the open is without question the way forward for all.

Science and indeed research in the open is without question the way forward for all.

Continue reading “How to start an Open Science revolution! An interview with patient advocate, Graham Steel.”  

In:  Other  
Putting open into action with ScienceOpen for OA Week 2016

Putting open into action with ScienceOpen for OA Week 2016

Open Access Week is the annual event to show our global support for all things open access! The theme this year is all about committing to putting open into action in order to take real steps towards open scholarship and supporting a stronger research framework.

SPARC have created an action portal of various activities you can undertake this week to help yourself and your colleagues support open access. These are:

  1. Make a list of open access journals in my discipline I would consider publishing in and share it with colleagues.
  2. Start a conversation about Open Access during a research group meeting, journal club, or staff meeting.
  3. Send at least one manuscript to an open-access journal within the next year.
  4. Deposit at least one of my articles into an open-access repository during Open Access Week and encourage colleagues to do the same.
  5. Use the SPARC author addendum on my next publication to reserve rights to make a copy of my work publicly accessible.
  6. Contribute to a conversation on campus about institutional support for Open Access.
  7. Sign the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment and commit to not using journal-based metrics in evaluation.
  8. Sign up for Impactstory to explore the online impact of your research and get an ORCID.

Thankfully, ScienceOpen is here to make these things even easier for you! Some related things you can do are:

  • Use our discovery and filter tools to discover journals in your research field.
  • Start a research collection for you and your colleagues.
  • Peer review any of 26 million research articles, and receive credit for openly sharing your expertise.
  • ScienceOpen is already linked with ImpactStory and ORCID, making cross-platform integration even easier!