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Tag: Open Access

In:  Aggregation  

Platinum indexing for platinum journals

Thank you to everyone who applied for the latest round of ScienceOpen’s free indexing competition! Following the major success of the first round, we are pleased to announce that we will be offering free abstracting and indexing services for the following journals:

  1. Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage
  2. Open Access Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
  3. Anti-Trafficking Review
  4. Path of Science

We also decided that one journal deserves a special free promotional journal collection: Anti-Trafficking Review. Congratulations!

Free to publish OA journals offer an incredible service to the research community and broader public, with editors often working long hours with little-no compensation. We want to recognise this effort and reward it with free indexing on our platform! But why should journal editors care?

More visibility for your journal

Journals indexed on ScienceOpen:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

To apply for the next round, an application form can be found here. Fill it out, and submit to our team. Simple, and hassle free!

 

New partnership with Cold Spring Harbor

 

At ScienceOpen we’re pleased to announce yet another new publishing partnership with Cold Spring Harbor. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is an internationally renowned publisher of books, journals, and electronic media, located on Long Island, New York, USA. Since 1933, it has helped to advance scientific knowledge in all areas of genetics and molecular biology, including cancer biology, plant science, bioinformatics, and neurobiology.

Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies is an open access, peer reviewed, international journal in the field of precision medicine. Anyone can now freely browse, sort, and peer review any content from the journal using our advanced discovery engine.

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Articles display scores from Altmetric, and like all other open access content on our platform display the little OA logo. Integrated into our existing corpus of 26 million articles and article records, Cold Spring Harbor content will be put into context through our citation and recommendation network.

For more information about our indexing services, please contact our Marketing Manager Agata Morka (agata.morka@scienceopen.com). We are still running our free indexing competition for APC-free open access journals, so get in touch if you qualify!

How to start an Open Science revolution! An interview with patient advocate, Graham Steel.

Continuing our Open Science Stars interview series, today we’re happy to bring to you Graham Steel, a relentless campaigner for all things Open!

Hi Graham, and thanks for joining us here! Could you start off by letting us know a little bit about your background?

For 25 years, my background (as in day job) was dealing with insurance claims for various insurers, legal firms and service providers. In my spare time as of around 2001, I became involved in research/science outreach and as of now, I would class myself as an open science enthusiast. From Jan 2015 – August 2016, I acted as Community Manager (then Social Media Manager) for ContentMine.

When did you first hear about open access/data/science? What were your initial thoughts?

In order, I first heard about open access late 2006, open science the following year and then open data. My initial thoughts were that all these entities were much needed and refreshing alternatives to all that I had seen or read about such topics up until then, i.e., closed access, prohibitive paywalls, “data not shown” etc.

You’re what some people call a ‘Patient Advocate’ – what is that, and what’s the story there?

The terms Patient Advocate and Patient Advocacy broadly speaking can mean a number of things. By definition, “Patient advocacy is an area of lay specialization in health care concerned with advocacy for patients, survivors, and carers”. For myself personally, this began in 2001 and mainly concerned bereaved relatives and then patients and their family members. See here for further details.

You relentlessly campaign for various aspects of open science – what drives you in this?

My means of background, I would say with certainty that during the period of around 2008 – 2011, the (sadly now deceased) social media aggregator site Friendfeed was the space in which the foundations for a lot of my current thinking were set out. Prior to that, having already been primed with open access and open data, that’s pretty much where open science really took off in earnest. Science and indeed research in the open is without question the way forward for all.

Science and indeed research in the open is without question the way forward for all.

Continue reading “How to start an Open Science revolution! An interview with patient advocate, Graham Steel.”  

In:  Other  
Putting open into action with ScienceOpen for OA Week 2016

Putting open into action with ScienceOpen for OA Week 2016

Open Access Week is the annual event to show our global support for all things open access! The theme this year is all about committing to putting open into action in order to take real steps towards open scholarship and supporting a stronger research framework.

SPARC have created an action portal of various activities you can undertake this week to help yourself and your colleagues support open access. These are:

  1. Make a list of open access journals in my discipline I would consider publishing in and share it with colleagues.
  2. Start a conversation about Open Access during a research group meeting, journal club, or staff meeting.
  3. Send at least one manuscript to an open-access journal within the next year.
  4. Deposit at least one of my articles into an open-access repository during Open Access Week and encourage colleagues to do the same.
  5. Use the SPARC author addendum on my next publication to reserve rights to make a copy of my work publicly accessible.
  6. Contribute to a conversation on campus about institutional support for Open Access.
  7. Sign the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment and commit to not using journal-based metrics in evaluation.
  8. Sign up for Impactstory to explore the online impact of your research and get an ORCID.

Thankfully, ScienceOpen is here to make these things even easier for you! Some related things you can do are:

  • Use our discovery and filter tools to discover journals in your research field.
  • Start a research collection for you and your colleagues.
  • Peer review any of 26 million research articles, and receive credit for openly sharing your expertise.
  • ScienceOpen is already linked with ImpactStory and ORCID, making cross-platform integration even easier!

 

 

 

 

 

OpenCon Berlin 2016: Advancing Openness in Research and Education

OpenCon Berlin 2016: Advancing Openness in Research and Education

ScienceOpen has teamed up with OpenAIRE and Digital-Science, alongside two of their portfolio companies – Figshare and Overleaf, to organise an OpenCon ‘satellite’ event to be held in Berlin on the 24-26th November.

This event will form one of the many international satellite events of the bigger OpenCon 2016 conference that will take place two weeks earlier in Washington, DC.

OpenCon is the student and early career academic professional conference that focuses on Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data. It seeks to empower the next generation to advance openness in research and education.

OpenCon satellite events are organised by those who are passionate about communicating the important messages of Open Information with the world, and are welcome to anyone interested in joining the conversation and connecting with a community of like-minded individuals.

When: 24th to 26th of November 2016.

Where: Humboldt University Berlin.

What: The event:will focus on putting Open Science into action through open collaboration. On Thursday evening (24th) we will be hosting a hackathon to get people in the mood and have a chance to get settled before the main event!

Hashtag: #OpenConBerlin

Our keynote speaker (Friday 25th, 10am), will be Julia Reda MEP – a woman on a mission to reform copyright legislation.

Alongside presentations and interesting talks made by those who have benefited and gained from open information, we’ll run focused workshops on themes you’ll choose via crowdsourcing.

During the event, we will run a few short and themed focus group sessions; in each session we hope to start a conversation where people share advice and success stories about the industry. Discussions and resources willbe collated via open documents like etherpads and collected as outputs of the event.

We’re all in the business of collaboration and we hope the event will inspire those who attend to do just that!

Registration: OpenCon Berlin 2016 is free to attend, but you must RSVP via the OpenCon Berlin 2016 website: http://www.opencon2016.org/opencon_2016_berlin

Useful links:

OpenCon: http://www.opencon2016.org/

ScienceOpen: https://www.scienceopen.com/

Digital Science: https://www.digital-science.com/

OpenAIRE: https://www.openaire.eu/

Etherpad: https://public.etherpad-mozilla.org/p/OpenConBerlin2016 – updates, the agenda, and notes will all be posted here.

A thoroughly British interview with Matthew Partridge

Cup of tea, anyone?
 
Continuing our amazing Open Science Stars series, we’re going a little closer towards my own routes today. We spoke with Matthew Partridge, a biochemist at Cranfield University in the UK about his experiences and thoughts on all things academia and open science. Caution: this post contains sarcasm.
 
Hi Matt! Thanks for joining us. Could you tell us a bit about your background?
 
No problem, happy to be here! And by here I mean ‘at my laptop 2 months after you sent me these questions, and several more weeks before it’s published’…
 
I’m not sure what to tell you about my background really (your next question deals with the ‘scientist’ bit) so I guess I could fill you in on the non-science part of my backstory. I’m British and in my mid 30’s and I currently work at Cranfield University – which is pretty much slap bang in the dead centre of England. My first degree is in BioChemistry, after which I spent 6 years toiling away in industrial medical device research. I then rejoined academia to do a PhD and have stayed ever since.
 
Matt assures me this a realistic representation of him..
Matt assures me this a realistic representation of him..
 
When did you first realise you wanted to be scientist? What was it that turned you?
I don’t think there was a time when I didn’t want to be a scientist. At various points in my life I’ve wanted to be various kinds of scientist – at one point even a pathologist. Both my parents were pharmacists so I was raised in a pretty pro-science house and it just appealed to me really. Although I did question it once when my science teacher wrote in final report (before moving to a bigger school) “Matthew should consider any career except science”. Since finding this out a few years ago, I have strongly resisted the urge to mail him 1,000 copies of my PhD thesis.
 

Continue reading “A thoroughly British interview with Matthew Partridge”  

In:  Other  

A whistle-stop tour of Open Access in China

Open Access is not a research issue. It’s not a European issue. It’s not a publisher or policy issue. Open Access is a global issue.

Knowledge is a public good, and forms the basis of an environment in which everyone can develop and build inclusively. It can help to inspire publication innovation and entrepreneurship. Open Access to research sits at the core of this on a global level.

As part of our ‘Open Science Stars’ series, we’ve been trying to expose some of the views and experiences of people from the world of open around the world. This global perspective is important, because researchers have a responsibility to contribute to the open sharing of results around the world, and not take a free ride based on elite privilege.

Open Access and China

Today, we wanted to delve a bit into the status of OA in China. Recently, we partnered with Higher Education Press, one of the top publishers in China, to index one of their flagship journals, and to demonstrate China’s continued support for more open research practices. China has committed to rapid growth in scientific research and development recently, and this is reflected in the solid evidence for a strongly developing open access research base.

Continue reading “A whistle-stop tour of Open Access in China”  

In:  Other  

Hassle-free indexing at ScienceOpen!

This post announces a call for journals that are Open Access and also charge no APCs (article-processing charges) to apply for our next-generation abstracting and indexing services on ScienceOpen for free!

Free to publish Open Access journals offer an incredible service to the research community and broader public, with editors often working long hours with no compensation. We want to recognise this effort and reward it with free indexing on our platform!

More visibility for your journal

Journals indexed on ScienceOpen:

  • Reach new audiences and maximize your readership
  • Drive more usage to your journals
  • Upload your content to a unique search/discovery and communication platform
  • Open up the context of your content

What do we need from you?

An application form can be found here. Fill it out, and submit to our team. Simple!

On the last day of every month, we will select and announce the winners via social media, and begin the next cycle! Out of the applicants, we will select up to 10 journals per month for free indexing, and the best application will get a free featured journal collection too! All others will roll over into the next month.

Continue reading “Hassle-free indexing at ScienceOpen!”  

In:  About SO  

Envisioning the next generation of scholarly communications

For years now, the journal and the publisher have held sway over many aspects of discovery and evaluation of research and researchers. The development of the Web was expected to disrupt this, but innovation has been slow. Collectively, the research community have been cautious in embracing the power that has been granted to us for integration, sharing, and using semantic technologies to enhance how we read, communicate, and re-use the scientific record.

At ScienceOpen, we believe that opening up article-level information will be part of the next wave of innovation in scholarly publishing and communications. Our CEO, Stephanie Dawson, spoke about this with Research Information recently, conveying the idea that we need to embrace the power of modern technologies to unlock the multi-dimensional intrinsic value of articles in their broader ‘context’.

Continue reading “Envisioning the next generation of scholarly communications”  

Open Science Stars: Jacinto Dávila and Open Access in Venezuela

If there’s one thing that this Open Science Stars series has shown us, it is that there is a great diversity of perspectives and experiences in the world of scholarly publishing and communications. This week, we have the absolute please of giving you all an interview with Prof. Jacinto Dávila, a researcher based in Venezuela. Here’s his open story.

Hi Jacinto! Thanks for joining us here. Could you start off by letting us know a little bit about your background?

Hello Jon. I am a computational logician. That is probably a label, invented at Imperial College (Ed: yay!). So, I would add that I am System Engineer and also got a PhD in Logic from Imperial. But almost all my professional life has been spent teaching and doing research at Universidad de Los Andes, in Venezuela. Thus, I will call myself a computer scientist in the third world.

Credit: Jacinto Davila
Credit: Jacinto Dávila

When did you first hear about open access and open science? What were your initial thoughts?

We had news of the rising movement back in 2005, thanks to Jean-Claude Guedón. I used to be at the computing academic board of my University and we got serious about it in 2006, submitting a proposal for our rector to sign the Berlin Declaration, which he did on October, 2006[1]. By then, we already had a fully operational repository[2], which have been up and running since 1995. We saw the open access initiative as a fantastic opportunity to level the game because we have historically suffered to have access to international results, which is always an expensive deal. We also thought, naively in retrospect¸that just by going open we would have a fair chance of publishing our own work too.

We need to change the defaults views on sharing knowledge, at least for public works.

Continue reading “Open Science Stars: Jacinto Dávila and Open Access in Venezuela”