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New research in materials science on ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Michael de Volder, Carbon Nanotube Lanterns, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

For the official press release, visit our Press Room, STM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

At the border between chemistry and physics, between basic and industrial research, materials science draws inspiration from interdisciplinarity. It embraces a myriad of scientific disciplines—from established fields such as metallurgy and medicine, to ongoing research in nanotechnology and computer science—to develop countless products and technologies for a more comfortable and sustainable future. How ever we categorize it, discovering and engineering new materials to meet our modern challenges is crucial to our competitive technological global society.

How are ScienceOpen users working with materials science content on the platform? Researchers have started collections on silicon thin film solar cells, electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), photoluminescent nanomaterials, EU NanoSafety Cluster publications (journal articles), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We welcome more researcher-led collections in materials science so contact us today for editor status.

To bring together and increase the visibility of the latest materials research, ScienceOpen has joined efforts with Carl Hanser Verlag in a partnership that integrates all of Hanser’s journal content and highlights the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) in the ScienceOpen discovery environment in the form of a featured collection.

Hanser’s International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) publishes original, high quality experimental and theoretical papers and reviews on basic and applied research in the field of materials science and engineering, with focus on synthesis, processing, constitution, and properties of all classes of materials. The journal is edited by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde e.V. (DGM) and co-edited by Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux (SF2M), and Swiss Association for Materials Science and Technology (SVMT). All articles submitted to the journal are published in English language.

The ‘International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR)’ features content from the leading experts around the world, covering research topics such as: ‘A simple and economic approach to superhydrophobic films’—showing that these films could resist the external force well and exhibit a durable superhydrophobicity—, ‘Effect of sensitization on tribological behavior of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel’—aiming to evaluate the dry sliding wear of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel as a function of the applied load—, ‘Effect of alumina particles on structural changes in MoS 2 during a ball milling process’—studying the morphological evolution of molybdenite using a ball milling technique—, ‘Two-stage synthesis of ultrafine powder of chromium carbide’—proposing a new method for the synthesis of ultrafine powder of chromium carbide—, and ‘Three-body abrasive wear behaviour of metastable spheroidal carbide cast irons with different chromium contents’—researching the effect of heat treatment and chromium contents (up to 9.1 wt.%) on the wear resistance of spheroidal carbide cast iron (9.5 wt.% V) using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, dilatometry and three-body abrasive testing.

ScienceOpen’s collection of articles promotes this individually published content within the larger context of over 47 million academic articles and records on the platform. Indexing the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) with ScienceOpen enhances the discoverability of Hanser’s specialized publications in the discipline of materials science thanks to the customized search engine on the ScienceOpen platform. All articles on ScienceOpen can be sorted and filtered to find relevant research. Furthermore, by using the post-publication peer review feature on ScienceOpen, researchers can keep the scientific debate about their research going long after publication.

Stephanie Dawson, CEO of ScienceOpen, stated “We are excited to add more materials science content to ScienceOpen, particularly as this research is often situated on interdisciplinary borders and between academia and industry.“

This partnership between ScienceOpen and Carl Hanser Verlag contextualizes the ‘International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR)’ within the broader research environment on ScienceOpen for the purpose of enhancing the visibility and impact of scientific research in the field of materials science.

Diverse Approaches to Peer Review

Portrait of Albert Einstein in a museum. Source: pixabay.com

Peer Review Week, Sep 10-15, 2018

Peer Review Week is a global event celebrating the role of peer review in maintaining scientific quality. This year marks the event’s fourth anniversary of bringing together researchers, institutions, and organizations committed to the message that good peer review is crucial to scholarly communications. This year Peer Review Week on the topic of diversity aims:

  • To emphasize the central role peer review plays in scholarly communication
  • To showcase the work of editors and reviewers
  • To share research and advance best practices
  • To highlight the latest innovation and applications.
    (Source: https://peerreviewweek.wordpress.com/)

Although peer review itself is not as young as the week-long event organized in its celebration, it is still a relatively new invention. Albert Einstein published his original papers in non-peer-reviewed German journals through 1933, most famously in the Annalen der Physik. Max Planck, one of the journal’s editors of the time, described his editorial philosophy as:

To shun much more the reproach of having suppressed strange opinions than that of having been too gentle in evaluating them.

After moving to the US, Einstein was so shocked that his paper submitted to the Physical Review in 1936 was met with negative criticism that he decided not to publish with them at all. Ironically, the paper in question hypothesized that gravitational waves do not exist. In retrospect, peer review saved Einstein the controversy and the embarrassment that would have ensued if he had published his original article.

Einstein’s anecdotal experience with non-/peer review journals both points to the necessity of peer review in quality scholarly publishing and to the danger of excluding scientific arguments from the academic narrative. ScienceOpen bridges the gap between these two opposite approaches by making both preprints and peer-reviewed scholarly articles accessible through its discovery environment with a unified review framework for researchers to evaluate results.

The “preprint” enables researchers to openly share their results with peers at an early stage and still publish the peer-reviewed final version of their findings in a journal of their choice. To help the researcher find preprints or concentrate only on peer-reviewed literature, searches on ScienceOpen can be filtered to view only preprints or may exclude preprints. We are currently tracking preprints from arXiv, bioRxiv, PeerJ, Preprints.org, ChemRxiv, and the Open Science Framework repositories.

Once a preprint has been published, ScienceOpen offers a full set of tools to peer-review and curate the content. Users can organize and manage the review entirely on their own. Found an interesting preprint, but want an expert opinion before using it in your research? Invite a reviewer! Researchers can either review an article themselves or invite an expert colleague to do so with one click of a button on every article page. Reviewers currently need a minimum of 5 records attached to their ORCID. ScienceOpen encourages everyone to openly participate in this process, thereby contributing to the diversification of expert opinions on a specific topic.

The fact that a paper has been published, and therefore peer-reviewed, does not mean that the research should stop. ScienceOpen enables post-publication peer review across 45 million article records, in the form of final-version comments. Article reviews, modeled after book reviews, are published with the author’s name and should provide orientation and an evaluation of the research for readers. Peer review as an open dialogue between experts actively contextualizes the research into ongoing scientific debates and helps researchers gain a deeper insight into a specific topic.

In order to fully recognize the contribution of reviewers and ensure maximal discoverability for authors, ScienceOpen integrates seamlessly with Crossref and ORCID. ScienceOpen has linked users with ORCID from the beginning. Recently, ScienceOpen has been actively participating in Crossref’s development of peer review content registration. In their recent press release, ‘Crossref facilitates the use of essential peer review information for scholarly communications‘, Crossref emphasized the importance of persistent records for peer review and commended ScienceOpen on successfully implementing metadata that enriches “scholarly discussion, reviewer accountability, transparency, and peer review analysis”. Stephanie Dawson, CEO of ScienceOpen, added that rich metadata is key to discoverability – for research articles, preprints, books, conference proceedings, and now for peer review reports. Crossref is making these reviews easier to identify and find, which translates into “more impact for researchers and publishers”. Anyone can retrieve the data necessary for their integration and analysis. As the Crossref press release concludes, rich metadata helps institutions and researchers build a better picture around the role of peer review in scholarly communications as a whole, not only in terms of identifying and assessing their own contributions.

Peer review is necessary to ensure quality scientific publishing, but it still needs to be honed to the greater benefit of the researcher, the scientific community, and ultimately the whole society. ScienceOpen contributes to this goal by integrating rich metadata, featuring preprints, and enabling post publication peer review. We look forward to hearing additional potential solutions to the diversification of the peer review process for a greater impact during #PeerReviewWeek18!

Beyond the Journal: ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society Launch Collaboration on New Cross-Disciplinary Collections

For formal press release, see our Press RoomKnowledgespeak and Information Today, Inc.

 

ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society are pleased to announce a collaboration on new ways to showcase cross-disciplinary research. The ScienceOpen discovery environment provides state-of-the-art technological infrastructure to promote exciting new initiatives from the Society’s journals.

Interdisciplinarity is key for the Microbiology Society in reaching a wide range of researchers, from microbiologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, social scientists and policymakers to physicists, chemists and engineers. In line with their mission to advance the understanding and impact of microbiology by connecting communities worldwide, the Society is exploring new ways to package digital information, from pop-up journals to mini-review formats, to bring diverse researchers together to solve global problems.

ScienceOpen has created a flexible “Collection” product to highlight publisher content within the larger context of academic research – with over 43 million articles and records on the site. The Microbiology Society is taking advantage of the full scope of interactive features available to researchers on ScienceOpen. As well as promoting the Open Access journal Microbial Genomics, the Society is using ScienceOpen to promote cross-disciplinary products that draw on articles from multiple journals, such as the new pop-up journal on antimicrobial resistance X-AMR, the Microbiome collection created in conjunction with the British Society for Immunology, and the Microbe and Virus Profiles created in conjunction with top microbiologists and the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, both of which offer concise reviews for experts and beyond.

Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Director of Publishing at the Microbiology Society, believes “As publishers, we have to reach out to researchers on the platforms they use, rather than expecting them to come to us. ScienceOpen offers us an opportunity to do that. The new Collections offering is a great supplement to the journal promotion tools on the platform, and we’ve particularly appreciated being able to curate collections that draw on content from multiple journals and even multiple publishers”.

CEO of ScienceOpen, Stephanie Dawson, said “We are excited about these new collections that go beyond the journal. As a discovery platform ScienceOpen is uniquely situated to help advance cross-disciplinary research. We aim to support publishers in reaching new audiences and authors in this space with our Collection product.”

A range of aggregated collection- and article-level metrics will provide enriched usage statistics to track the success of these experiments in ScienceOpen’s continuously expanding research database.

About ScienceOpen: ScienceOpen, founded in 2013 in Berlin and Boston by Alexander Grossmann and Tibor Tscheke, is a freely-accessible, interactive discovery platform for scholarly research. From smart, multidimensional search to research collections and open peer review, it offers a full spectrum of options to effectively find and share research results.

About the Microbiology Society: The Microbiology Society is a membership charity for scientists interested in microbes, their effects and their practical uses. It is one of the largest microbiology societies in Europe, with a worldwide membership based in universities, hospitals, research institutes and schools.

In:  Announcements  

Boost your open citations with our new article request feature

Missing an article or citation from ScienceOpen, or want to add more of your own publications? Users can now request articles to be integrated into our database via their dashboard. These can be your own articles, or someone else’s – the choice is yours!

All we need are either a list of:

  • CrossRef DOIs
  • DOAJ IDs
  • PubMed IDs

Simply upload a file or copy and paste them in, click the button and away you go! We’ll send you a notification by email to let you know the status of each article. We’ll work our magic behind the scenes and integrate your selection as soon as is computationally possible.

Find this feature on your user dashboard.

Boost your citations

One of the great things about this new feature is that you can add a list of DOIs of articles that cite your own work. We provide a free and open citation network for each of our users, based on extracting citation data from peer reviewed publications. Thanks to initiatives like I4OC, it is becoming easier to provide enriched citation information like we do for researchers for free.

To find your Dashboard, click on the My ScienceOpen tab at the top!

By adding research that cites your work, we provide an easy and great way to make sure that your citation profile is complete! This isn’t gaming the system, it’s simply making it comprehensive and open. That’s important. Put this in the context of our recently launched author-metrics, and you’re on to a winning academic profile!

For collection editors

If you have a collection at ScienceOpen, you can specify that these records be automatically integrated into them. You can add these in bulk, with 100 DOIs per request for now. Personalising your collections and making them complete has never been easier! If you want to set up your own collection and try out these features, contact us here!

Integration and validation

By using the new ‘claim authorship’ feature, your articles will be directly integrated with your ScienceOpen profile and ORCID. This provides crucial cross-validation of your research history, a unique feature of ScienceOpen. If you’re adding you own article records, these will be available in your ‘Claim your articles’ section of the Dashboard, where you can easily add them to your profile.

Collecting and Connecting with ORCID!

We recognise that no research database is complete, and ScienceOpen is no exception. We work closely with publishers, ORCID, and platforms like PubMed to integrate new content on a daily basis. But we can’t pick up everything, and that’s where you come in!

By adding personalised content, you help us to fill in the blank spots in our database. This helps to enrich our network by putting this content into our semantically linked network.  We are currently only indexing research articles and not book chapters, proceedings or other content types.

So pop over to your dashboard, try it out, and let us know what you think!

In:  About SO  

Making your science work for society

Recently, we announced new features enabling authors to add non-specialist summaries to their articles indexed on ScienceOpen. We believe that having authors add these to their articles helps to make them more accessible to a wider audience, increase their reach. It makes a clear statement that they care about the societal impact of their research.

Value added!

Well, clearly you are all seeing the value in these features too! We’ve already had over 170 great authors writing non-specialist summaries since making the announcement. By integrating this into our research engine, we are seeing those articles gaining a huge boost in popularity! These authors have also added extra keywords and thumbnails to their articles to make them more visible and discoverable on ScienceOpen.

Great author summary of important groundwater research in Indonesia (Source)

Making an impact in the open

We are extremely happy to see authors keen to make their work more accessible. The great thing about adding these summaries is that they are valuable whether or not the articles are published Open Access.

Some of our favourites so far are:

Continue reading “Making your science work for society”  

Manage your research articles freely on ScienceOpen

In the current ecosystem of academic publishing, research outputs make a long journey from the desks of researchers to research platforms. Once a preprint has been turned into a published paper, authors have almost no influence on metadata tagging, or whether their articles got indexed in a whole world of databases and research platforms. If you have ever come across a ‘ghost profile’ of yourself on the Web, this is where it came from.

With MyScienceOpen, our vision was to create a holistic platform where researchers can flexibly interact with their research outputs, and control the content themselves. In addition to our range of visibility enhancement services and impact monitoring tools, it remains crucial to enable authors to freely manage their articles on our platform and add new content easily and in a 100% legal way.

Flexible interaction with content from publishers

As a result, we are excited to announce our new article integration feature. This is the first time that a major research networking platform facilitates interaction with content from publishers, as opposed to manually uploaded[1] records from individual authors.

In a time where we are all over-worked, it is crucial not to add to researcher fatigue. This is why we leverage ORCID for seamless and efficient integration of your research outputs into ScienceOpen.

Here, we will briefly guide you through our new content management features and share some tips and tricks to make the most out of them. Ready?

How to add your content to ScienceOpen and manage your publications

At the moment, you can add content to your ScienceOpen profile from two sources: from ORCID or form our existing corpus of 32 million article records. In addition, collection editors are also welcome to submit DOI lists, and BibTex or RefWorks files to us, and let us work our magic behind the scenes to integrate these into our database or your profile.

  • Via ORCID

ORCID integration on ScienceOpen has never been easier. Your ScienceOpen profile and list of publications can be updated directly using your ORCID profile, providing effortless integration of the two.

This means that there’s no journal policy checking, no manual uploading, and no takedown notices, as the whole thing is based directly on your publication record itself.

ORCID integration on ScienceOpen
Seamless ORCID integration on ScienceOpen 1.

Continue reading “Manage your research articles freely on ScienceOpen”  

In:  About SO  

Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?

MyScienceOpen is your ScienceOpen

Last week, we unveiled MyScienceOpen, our new professional networking platform for researchers. MySciencOpen comes with a whole cadre of new features that combine the functionality of a range of existing social platforms, and bring them directly to you all in one place. You get access to all of this at the click of a button through our ORCID integration. Free, legal, and easy!

One of the main new features we’ve added is the ability for authors to upload non-specialist summaries to their articles. This is great for increasing the visibility and impact of your research at the point of discovery.

But how can you track this increased impact? Aha, well, we thought of that. Every user at ScienceOpen now has a whole suite of brand new metrics that track how their content is being re-used across ScienceOpen.

Quantifying your context

Everyone can see the tab for your content in context. These show how many total ‘nodes’ or connections your work forms in the context of the ScienceOpen platform. We show:

  • Your total number of publications
  • Your total number of different journals published in
  • How many co-authors you’ve published with
  • How many articles you’ve referenced
  • How many articles in our database have cited you
Exhibit 1

Continue reading “Metrics are dead! Long live… metrics?”  

In:  About SO  

Enhanced services for publishers and editors

At ScienceOpen, we are constantly upgrading and adapting our platform to meet the needs of the different stakeholders in scholarly publishing. We work with a huge range of publishers (e.g., BrillOpen Library of HumanitiesHigher Education Press PeerJCold Spring Harbor) and listen to the needs of researchers, together building solutions to help enhance the global research process.

With the re-launch of ScienceOpen, we really are pushing forward to create a multi-purpose, solution-oriented platform that aligns with ongoing trends in scholarly publishing.

ScienceOpen for publishers and editors

Our new platform provides an invaluable service for publishers and editors. We provide aggregate metrics for re-use, including the number of readers on our platform and the summed Altmetric score. As you can see in the example below for BioMed Central, these numbers can be used to look at how well you’re competing with other publishers, as well as how your content is being read and re-used by researchers. Content on the site is aggregated through PubMed Central, SciELO, ORCID and arXiv or added via reference analysis with a DOI metadata check with Crossref. Or publishers can work directly with us to add their content to the site for a fee. We now offer extra features like a “read” button link back to the publisher version of record. We are happy to index content of all license types.

The more of your content we have on our platform, the better the level of service we can provide for you.

More than 200,000 articles from BioMed Central with a whole cadre of useful metrics and filtering tools

Continue reading “Enhanced services for publishers and editors”  

In:  Collections  
ScienceOpen collections are now even more useful for researchers

ScienceOpen collections are now even more useful for researchers

In the new year, we re-launched ScienceOpen and basically made it even more epic for publishers and researchers.

We have unified our search interface and applied it to all of our author/member profiles, collections, journals and publishers. That’s a whole lot more research context, metadata, metrics, and useful functionality. The newly upgraded usage statistics are incredibly useful in seeing who us re-using your work and how. This additional dimension is built on top of our newly enhanced search and discovery platform, and provides a powerful way for researchers to develop research, article context, and also their individual profiles within the research community, and all in the open.

We built a ‘research collider’ to make magic happen

At ScienceOpen, we offer a platform where any researcher can comment on, and post-publication peer review any research article they want to. By creating thematic collections, you can bring this into a community space, putting work and additional commentary in the context of related research. By having collection editors that can invite people to review articles, we retain the moderation aspect that is crucial to developments in open peer review. We give the power to researchers to do what they want, when they want, and to use and share their expertise in the most efficient possible way.

Continue reading “ScienceOpen collections are now even more useful for researchers”  

In:  Other  

Collections as the future of academic-led journals

ScienceOpen Collections are thematic groups of research articles that transcend journals and publishers to transform how we collate and build upon scientific knowledge.

What are Collections

The modern research environment is a hyper-dimensional space with a vast quantity of outputs that are impossible to manually manage. You can think of research like a giant Rubik’s cube: you have different ‘colours’ of research that you have to mix and match and play around with to discover how the different sections fit together to become something useful.

CC BY-SA 3.0,  Booyabazooka (Wikipedia)
CC BY-SA 3.0, Booyabazooka (Wikipedia)

We view Collections as the individual faces of a Rubik’s cube. They draw from the vast, and often messy, pool of published research to provide an additional layer of context and clarity. They represent a new way for researchers to filter the published record to discover and curate content that is directly relevant to them, irrespective of who published it or what journal it appears in.

Advantages of Collections

Perhaps the main advantage of Collections to researchers is that they are independent of journals or publishers and their branding criteria. Researchers are undoubtedly the best-placed to assess what research is relevant to themselves and their communities. As such, we see Collections as the natural continuing transformation of the concept of the modern journal, acting in almost full cycle to return them to their basic principles.

The advantage of using Collections is that they provide researchers with the power to filter and select from the published record and create what is in essence a highly-specialised virtual journal. This means that Collections are not pre-selective, but instead comprise papers discriminated only by a single criterion: research that is relevant to your peers, and also deemed relevant by them.

Filtering for Collections occurs at different levels depending on scope or complexity of research. For example, Collections can be designed to focus on different research topics, lab groups or research groups, communities, or even departments or institutions. Collections can also be created for specific conferences and include posters from these, published on ScienceOpen. You define the scope and the selection criteria.

Continue reading “Collections as the future of academic-led journals”