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The British Journal of Pharmacy joins ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Adrian Scottow, Pharmacy, Flickr, CC BY-SA

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce a partnership with the University of Huddersfield Press, a primarily open access publisher of high quality research, to promote the British Journal of Pharmacy – a new featured collection of scientific articles in pharmaceutical sciences.

British Journal of Pharmacy is an online, peer-reviewed, open access journal with no article processing charges (APCs). This publication is a product of University of Huddersfield Press’ mission to improve access to scholarly work for the benefit of all by publishing innovative research as open access. The journal publishes research on the latest developments in pharmacy in the form of scholarly papers and critical reviews. Submissions can be accepted from a wide range of pharmaceutical sciences including, among others: pharmacy, molecular pharmacy, drug delivery and targeting, pharmacoeconomics, pharmacokinetics and therapeutics, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry, pharmacovigilance, and innovations in teaching pharmacy.

University Press & Marketing Manager, Megan Taylor, said “The University of Huddersfield Press aims to improve access to scholarly research for all – we are looking forward to working with ScienceOpen to make our innovative research available to even wider audiences.”

The new featured collection ‘British Journal of Pharmacy’ brings together articles from the diversity of topics relevant to the field of pharmacy. For example, ‘Medical Pharmacology and Therapeutics’ by Derek G. Waller and Anthony P. Sampson provides a deeper understanding of the principles of drug usage by explaining the basic science behind the clinical application of pharmacological agents. The critical review ‘Going Natural: Using polymers from nature for gastroresistant applications’ by Joao A.C. Barbosa, Barbara R Conway, and Hamid A. Merchant examines natural substances employed in producing gastroresistant products, their shortcomings and potential industrial applications, therein identifying the gaps in our current knowledge to encourage future research. Similarly, ‘Systematic Review of Medicine-Related Problems in Adult Patients with Atrial Fibrillation on Direct Oral Anticoagulants’ by Huda Alewairdhi, Nkiruka Umaru, and Zoe Aslanpour exemplifies the “value of systematic review of medications to inform clinical practice” by identifying the inconclusiveness on major safety end points, including major bleeding, in English language literature on medicine-related problems of direct oral anticoagulants DOACs in the treatment of adults with atrial fibrillation.

Contextualizing pharmacy in Britain as a research field contingent upon global political conditions, the journal features two papers by key opinion leaders about the implications of Brexit on the world of pharmacy. ‘Brexit – What are the potential consequences for pharma patents and SPCs?’ by Jamie Fraser and James Stone addresses the uncertain future of patents and SPCs if the UK fails to reach an agreement with the EU. In ‘Breaking up the band: European regulatory cooperation in a post-Brexit world’ , Virginia Acha argues that—given all the implications of Brexit—the best decision is to maintain cooperation between the regulatory agencies Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) under new structures.

ScienceOpen and University of Huddersfield Press hope that all our users interested in pharmaceutical sciences will enjoy browsing and reading the carefully curated, peer-reviewed, open access articles in our new featured collection British Journal of Pharmacy.

Beetle boom on ScienceOpen: recent additions from the field of entomology

(Credit: Christopher Marley, Pinterest)

Insects are everywhere. The fact that their diversity surpasses any other group of organisms is an amazing evolutionary success story, and they have a significant impact on the environment and therefore upon our own lives. Our recent additions from the field of entomology open up new perspectives to the study of these colourful creatures. They help us to develop a better understanding on the role insects play within a range of environments, and the solutions they can provide to everyday  and global problems.

More specifically, they tell us about:

  • The significance of their contribution to biodiversity and its critical role in human culture
  • The role that insects play within a given environment
  • The kinds of ecological interactions with humans and other lifeforms on earth and the ways people benefit from sharing their life space with insects
  • Their positions in food webs
  • Their morphology, evolution, and biomechanics
  • The challenges in the description and classification of this diverse group of animals

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In:  Announcements  

Digging dinosaurs at ScienceOpen

Today, we’re happy to announce the integration of the Journal of Paleontological Techniques (JPT) onto our platform! This journal is all about sharing and opening up the methods that palaeontologists use in their day-to-day research.

So if you love Jurassic Park and dinosaurs, this collection is perfect for you! All articles are Open Access, which means they are free to read, share, and re-use by anyone.

Sophie the Stegosaurus, on display at the Natural History Museum in London (source)

Here are some of our absolute favourite new articles:

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In:  Other  

Why ‘context’ is important for research

Context is something we’ve been thinking a lot about at ScienceOpen recently. It comes from the Latin ‘con’ and ‘texere’ (to form ‘contextus’), which means ‘weave together’. The implications for science are fairly obvious: modern research is about weaving together different strands of information, thought, and data to place your results into the context of existing research. This is the reason why we have introductory and discussion sections at the intra-article level.

But what about context at a higher level?

Context can defined as: “The circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood.” Simple follow on questions might be then, what is the context of a research article? How do we define that context? How do we build on that to do science more efficiently? The whole point for the existence of research articles is that they can be understood by as broad an audience as possible so that their re-use is maximised.

There are many things that impinge upon the context of research. Paywalls, secretive and exclusive peer review, lack of discovery, lack of inter-operability, lack of accessibility. The list is practically endless, and a general by-product of a failure for traditional scholarly publishing models to embrace a Web-based era.

Continue reading “Why ‘context’ is important for research”