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Free Open Access Journal Hosting on ScienceOpen to Kick Off the New Year

Image: Tom Magliery, Flickr, CC-BY NC SA

2020 will ring in a decade of more openness in scholarly research – more open access, more open peer review, more open source development, more open humanities and science. ScienceOpen is thrilled to support this development with a wide range of technology solutions. After all, it has been part of our mission statement, and our name, from day one.

For small publishing organizations like library publishers, societies, university presses or single journals, metadata generation and distribution can be a time-consuming manual effort. Sometimes important information is left out simply due to technical restrictions. ScienceOpen can take the pain out of these processes, saving you time and resources and providing richer metadata to your partners. Turning these technical tasks over to ScienceOpen as professional service provider can free up your time to focus on more important editorial goals.

For open access journals we now offer full journal hosting within our unique interactive discovery environment of over 60 million article records. With Crossref DOI deposit, ORCID integration, open review infrastructure, long term archiving, and state-of-the-art indexing and SEO, your open access journal can make ScienceOpen its home base and tap into the full infrastructure of scholarly publishing, all for a very reasonable price. We want to see open access journals grow and flourish in the next year and decade!

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In:  Other  

Thank you for a successful 2019!

As the year draws to a close, we would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our users, editors, publishers and supporters for a successful 2019.

Cheers!

This has been a year of big growth – we hit 60 million publication records, all linked and contextualized in our citation graph. That adds up to a lot of computing power without a day of down-time and freely-accessible around the globe. We also saw over 50% more visitors in the last three months than the same period last year. Keep on coming back! You don’t have to register to use the ScienceOpen discovery tools, but in 2019 we also hit 40,000 registered users. That’s a lot of ORCID power. Thanks to our authors who published preprints and posters on ScienceOpen and to those who added a lay summary to their articles.

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In:  Other, Research  

Search for science with us at Berlin Science Week!

Berlin Science Week will take place between 1-10 November and ScienceOpen is preparing something special for the occasion!

Make sure to kick off the Week right by coming to our workshop on Friday, Nov. 1, 17:00-20:00 (save the date!). This year we are focusing on going beyond Google in your online search for verified scientific resources.

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ScienceOpen launches hosting services for conference proceedings with BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT

Photo credit: ‘Quantum computing’, Kevin Dooley, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

For the official press release, visit our Press Room.

Beginning July 2019, the conference proceedings from the Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC) organized by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT will be fully hosted on ScienceOpen to contextualize and advance computing research in the form of an interactive featured collection within the discovery environment. Following our hosting cooperation with UCL Press, this partnership marks a new milestone in ScienceOpen’s portfolio of hosting features for publishers to contextualize and increase the discoverability of their content.

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Toast to knowledge and celebrate research discovery at Pint of Science Germany

Photo Credit: Elizabeth Pankratz, Pint of Science

It’s time for beer… and science! Sounds unlikely? Not for Pint of Science, a non-profit organization that brings esteemed scientists to your local pub for a few days in May every year to discuss their research with you over a beer. No prior knowledge is required, and everyone is invited to participate. This your chance to meet the scientists who shape our world and future! ScienceOpen is especially proud to be a sponsor for this year’s Pint of Science in Berlin taking place May 20-22, 2019. Continue reading “Toast to knowledge and celebrate research discovery at Pint of Science Germany”  

Open Science Resources on ScienceOpen

Photo credit: ‘Unlock’, Thomas Ulrich, Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

ScienceOpen has been committed to making science open from its onset. Some of our latest projects in realizing this commitment have been launching the ‘UCL Open: Environment‘ megajournal, contextualizing the new open access journal ‘BMJ Open Science’ into the ScienceOpen research discovery environment of 53 million article records, and offering some ideas on how you can contribute to open science in small but significant ways.

In light of the 6th Open Science Conference organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science in Berlin this week, we decided to give you an overview of some of the most relevant and diverse research content on open science curated in the form of researcher-led collections on ScienceOpen. Our research recommendations below discuss some of the most pertinent issues in open science, such as the FAIR data principles, reproducible research, metadata, and open access scholarship. Enjoy!

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Kicking off the new year with 50 million article records!

Image by Epic Fireworks, Flickr, CC BY

We made it! ScienceOpen reached a major milestone: 50 million article records in 5 years of making science open! What’s more, this number is increasing faster and faster as we index more articles. ScienceOpen’s aggregation engine enables us to track citation genealogies and identify similar publications from published articles, making it possible to exponentially push the boundaries of our research discovery environment.

To mark our successful 5-year journey to 50 million records, ScienceOpen CEO Stephanie Dawson talks about the meaning of this milestone for ScienceOpen’s future and scholarly communication in general.

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Open Science: Is the future already here?

Photo credit: ‘Science is great, open it (open science)’, Martin Clavey, Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

How will we report the results of scholarly research in the future? Probably not on paper. Digital, accessible, machine-readable, reproducible describe the foundations of open science. And, increasingly, the question for funders, publishers, and institutes is becoming: can we influence how research is done by changing the requirements and attributes of the research “paper”?

With the growing opportunities of the digital world, the demand for open access to research articles developed into an open science movement that strives for science to be done in an “open, and reproducible fashion where all components of research are open”. The process of making all aspects of science open, transparent, and interoperable is a huge endeavour and means different things for different communities. ScienceOpen’s commitment to open science has been clear from its foundation: we make science open. Our latest project in the realization of this goal has been integrating ‘BMJ Open Science’ as a new open access featured collection on our platform.

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New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

Source: pixabay.com

To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading “New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”  

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