Blog
About

Category: Peer Review

Trust in Transparency: Join us and UCL Press for a Peer Review Week Event

Explore new tools for next-generation, open peer review 

In concurrence with Peer Review Week 2020, Stephanie Dawson and Ian Caswell of UCL Press will host a virtual event this Thursday, September 24th, describing the Open Peer Review tools behind UCL Open: Environment. The event will have the form of a case study, and Ian and Stephanie will explain the editorial workflow of UCL Open in addition to sharing their experience in implementing open publishing models on ScienceOpen. Come and tune in if you are a publisher, an editor, or simply an open science enthusiast, and get unique insight into the practical aspects of open publishing! This event will take place over Zoom at 4 pm CEST (UTC+2) on this coming Thursday. Go to the event page here to register so you can take part in this discussion! 

Continue reading “Trust in Transparency: Join us and UCL Press for a Peer Review Week Event”  

Open peer review: A live demo by ScienceOpen and UCL Press

ScienceOpen Webinar for Open Publishing Fest

Explore new tools for next-generation, open peer review. ScienceOpen and UCL Press offer an interactive, hands-on, online workshop to demo the open peer review tools behind UCL’s interdisciplinary publishing platform UCL Open: Environment for researchers and editors.


Click here for the webinar registration link

Continue reading “Open peer review: A live demo by ScienceOpen and UCL Press”  

A Workflow for Open Peer Review: Case Study UCL Press

Peer review is a key element of scholarly publishing, but for the past decade the research community has struggled to move beyond the black box and develop new open models of research evaluation. University College London and UCL Press would like to change that. Since the beginning, ScienceOpen has been committed to open peer review – now offering post-publication review options for over 62 million articles and preprints. So, with the vision of a university-led publishing platform based on open review principles, UCL Press teamed up with ScienceOpen to create the journal “UCL Open: Environment”.

Continue reading “A Workflow for Open Peer Review: Case Study UCL Press”  

Explore COVID-19 researcher-led resources and share your own expertise on the ScienceOpen platform

Help us inform others and get credit for it! At ScienceOpen, we are catalysing the information campaign around the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19. Our Collections infrastructure is available to use free-of-charge, for both publishers and researchers alike. Everyone can join us to build a rich network of knowledge around the coronavirus, and each individual contribution is very important and valued on our platform!

In this post, we want to showcase a number of coronavirus-related Collections curated by researchers, and to present to you how to use the ScienceOpen platform to share own research and create digital resources for others to learn from.

Continue reading “Explore COVID-19 researcher-led resources and share your own expertise on the ScienceOpen platform”  

Quality in Peer Review

The long-awaited Peer Review Week has just started, and we could not be more excited! This year’s edition is all about quality in peer review. So, what does quality peer review look like and why is it important?  

Peer review is key to facilitating the growth of scientific knowledge. It allows the community to pool its resources, provide guidance and maintain a common standard of research. It is in everybody’s interest to ensure its highest quality, and the more is invested into this process, the higher the returns. However, the lack of transparency, accountability, and recognition for reviewers creates an unsustainable model of peer review and hampers realizing its full potential. 

ScienceOpen is set to change this!  

Continue reading “Quality in Peer Review”  

DIY with ScienceOpen’s fully-loaded publishing platform

Launching a new open access journal or an open access press? ScienceOpen now provides full end-to-end open access publishing solutions – embedded within our smart interactive discovery environment. A modular approach allows open access publishers to pick and choose among a range of services and design the platform that fits their goals and budget.

You want to create a unique publishing identity? Book your own sub-domain powered by ScienceOpen to manage and host existing open access publications or start new journals. ScienceOpen can provide technical infrastructure for manuscript submission, peer review management, open access hosting, article versioning, distribution, analytics and APC management for journals and (coming soon) books. The ScienceOpen platform has its own powerful citation index and is uniquely integrated with ORCID, Crossref and Altmetric to immediately plug your publications into the infrastructure of global scholarly communication.

Continue reading “DIY with ScienceOpen’s fully-loaded publishing platform”  

Reviewer under review: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel

Best wishes for the New Year 2019! Last month we bid farewell to 2018 by putting our topical researcher-led collections in focus and organizing a prize draw for an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet for researchers reviewing any paper on ScienceOpen in December. Today we would like to thank everyone who participated in the drawing and are pleased to announce the winner: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat Jena (Jena, Thüringen).

Prof. Beutel is editor of the collection ‘Coleoptera’, a comprehensive overview of over 9,000 research articles covering this immensely diverse group. This ScienceOpen collection goes beyond the traditional fields of taxonomy and morphology, and integrates an increasing number of open access records. Curated by an evolutionary biologist who considers himself primarily a systematist, the collection covers multiple lines of research, such as phylogeny, classification, genetics, and physiology. ‘Coleoptera’ is an indispensable tool in biodiversity research and provides an essential reference system for studies in other fields. Evolutionary biology of Coleoptera relates to topics such as physiological and genetic backgrounds of feeding habits or reproductive biology, making it an exciting group to study. This is especially true in our “age of phylogenomics”, when rapidly growing molecular data opens new fascinating perspectives in the research on beetles and other organisms.

Continue reading “Reviewer under review: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel”  

Submit an article review and win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet!

To celebrate the winter holidays and reward one lucky researcher, we would like to announce a prize draw to win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet this month! To participate, all you need to do is review an article on ScienceOpen before the end of December and we will automatically consider you for the drawing.

An article review on ScienceOpen functions like a book review – it should help readers to understand the strengths and weaknesses of an interpretation or a data set. As an expert, you can review any article in your field across 49 million article records on our platform. Reviewing requires an ORCID and 5 publications. Interested in reviewing an article but don’t have 5 publications linked to your ORCID? Contact us! Your review will receive a Crossref DOI and can be linked to your ORCID publication record. Continue reading “Submit an article review and win an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet!”  

Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen

Image credit: Fotolia

You can now publish your preprint directly to ScienceOpen. The discovery platform ScienceOpen will put your work in context and open it up to review with a wide range of author-mediated peer review tools.

Preprints, first draft research manuscripts, have existed almost as long as the Internet. Scientists have been taking advantage of online communication to speed up research for almost 3 decades. ScienceOpen understands the importance of allowing researchers to openly share their results with the scientific community at an early stage in their research. The advantage for researchers is that they get early feedback from peers but can still publish the final version in most peer-reviewed journals of their choosing. To support researchers in fully utilizing the benefits of preprint publishing, ScienceOpen is pleased to launch open and free preprint publishing on our platform! With this beta service, anyone can now upload, publish, and promote their preprint using a free and simple interface with access to a full suite of tools for peer review, constructive discussion through comments, and usage and impact tracking.

We have supported the essential role of preprints in speeding up science from the beginning by integrating arXiv preprints on the platform. Records for over 27,000 bioRxiv preprints in our discovery environment followed suit, along with the capacity to add records from other preprint serves such as Preprints.org, PeerJ Preprints, ChemRxiv, and Open Science Framework repositories. Given our belief in the benefits of preprints in advancing science, it seemed only logical to develop a new feature that will enable all researchers to take advantage of preprints in scholarly research and communications. Continue reading “Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen”  

Diverse Approaches to Peer Review

Portrait of Albert Einstein in a museum. Source: pixabay.com

Peer Review Week, Sep 10-15, 2018

Peer Review Week is a global event celebrating the role of peer review in maintaining scientific quality. This year marks the event’s fourth anniversary of bringing together researchers, institutions, and organizations committed to the message that good peer review is crucial to scholarly communications. This year Peer Review Week on the topic of diversity aims:

  • To emphasize the central role peer review plays in scholarly communication
  • To showcase the work of editors and reviewers
  • To share research and advance best practices
  • To highlight the latest innovation and applications.
    (Source: https://peerreviewweek.wordpress.com/)

Although peer review itself is not as young as the week-long event organized in its celebration, it is still a relatively new invention. Albert Einstein published his original papers in non-peer-reviewed German journals through 1933, most famously in the Annalen der Physik. Max Planck, one of the journal’s editors of the time, described his editorial philosophy as:

To shun much more the reproach of having suppressed strange opinions than that of having been too gentle in evaluating them.

After moving to the US, Einstein was so shocked that his paper submitted to the Physical Review in 1936 was met with negative criticism that he decided not to publish with them at all. Ironically, the paper in question hypothesized that gravitational waves do not exist. In retrospect, peer review saved Einstein the controversy and the embarrassment that would have ensued if he had published his original article. Continue reading “Diverse Approaches to Peer Review”  

  Previous page
1235