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Reviewer under review: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel

Best wishes for the New Year 2019! Last month we bid farewell to 2018 by putting our topical researcher-led collections in focus and organizing a prize draw for an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet for researchers reviewing any paper on ScienceOpen in December. Today we would like to thank everyone who participated in the drawing and are pleased to announce the winner: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat Jena (Jena, Thüringen).

Prof. Beutel is editor of the collection ‘Coleoptera’, a comprehensive overview of over 9,000 research articles covering this immensely diverse group. This ScienceOpen collection goes beyond the traditional fields of taxonomy and morphology, and integrates an increasing number of open access records. Curated by an evolutionary biologist who considers himself primarily a systematist, the collection covers multiple lines of research, such as phylogeny, classification, genetics, and physiology. ‘Coleoptera’ is an indispensable tool in biodiversity research and provides an essential reference system for studies in other fields. Evolutionary biology of Coleoptera relates to topics such as physiological and genetic backgrounds of feeding habits or reproductive biology, making it an exciting group to study. This is especially true in our “age of phylogenomics”, when rapidly growing molecular data opens new fascinating perspectives in the research on beetles and other organisms.

Continue reading “Reviewer under review: Prof. Rolf Georg Beutel”  

Open Science: Is the future already here?

Photo credit: ‘Science is great, open it (open science)’, Martin Clavey, Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

How will we report the results of scholarly research in the future? Probably not on paper. Digital, accessible, machine-readable, reproducible describe the foundations of open science. And, increasingly, the question for funders, publishers, and institutes is becoming: can we influence how research is done by changing the requirements and attributes of the research “paper”?

With the growing opportunities of the digital world, the demand for open access to research articles developed into an open science movement that strives for science to be done in an “open, and reproducible fashion where all components of research are open”. The process of making all aspects of science open, transparent, and interoperable is a huge endeavour and means different things for different communities. ScienceOpen’s commitment to open science has been clear from its foundation: we make science open. Our latest project in the realization of this goal has been integrating ‘BMJ Open Science’ as a new open access featured collection on our platform.

Continue reading “Open Science: Is the future already here?”  

McGill Professors/MUHC RI scientists launch new Point-Of-Care Testing (POCT) Super Collection on Infectious Diseases on ScienceOpen

For the original press release, see our Press Room and Knowledgespeak

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce six new collections on Point-Of-Care Testing technologies  curated and organized by a team led  by Dr. Nitika Pant Pai, MD., MPH., PhD—a tenured Associate Professor at McGill University in the Department of Medicine and a Research Scientist at the MUHC Research Institute—as active contributions to the mission of open science medicine research for a positive global impact in healthcare. Her trainees, Anna De Waal, Alexie Kim, Nandi Belinsky, joined her in curating this collection. Continue reading “McGill Professors/MUHC RI scientists launch new Point-Of-Care Testing (POCT) Super Collection on Infectious Diseases on ScienceOpen”  

New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen

Source: pixabay.com

To increase the discoverability of latest research in linguistics and support open access scientific publishing, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to integrate Glossa and two more OLH open access linguistics journals—Journal of Portuguese Linguistics and Laboratory Phonology—in the ScienceOpen discovery environment as featured collections.

In November 2015, the entire editorial staff of the top journal in linguistics Lingua resigned in protest over high subscription prices imposed by the journal’s publisher, Elsevier. With the aim of producing a fully open access publication in linguistics, Lingua’s editors founded a new journal: Glossa. Since its foundation, Glossa has been committed to general linguistics, publishing contributions from all areas of the field researching the nature of language and the language faculty. Published by Ubiquity Press and supported by the Open Library of Humanities and LingOA, this journal is produced for all linguists, independent of their specialization.

To ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in making research publicly accessible, Glossa articles are made available online as soon as they are ready. The journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

ScienceOpen is committed to open exchange of research as a road to more progressive and open scientific societies worldwide. This partnership with the Open Library of Humanities contributes to globally open science by placing the featured collection ‘Glossa: a journal of general linguistics’ in the research discovery environment of over 47 million articles that can be filtered and sorted using ScienceOpen’s customized search engine to ensure all users find exactly what they are looking for. Continue reading “New open access research in linguistics on ScienceOpen”  

I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”  

New research in materials science on ScienceOpen

Image Credit: Michael de Volder, Carbon Nanotube Lanterns, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

For the official press release, visit our Press Room, STM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

At the border between chemistry and physics, between basic and industrial research, materials science draws inspiration from interdisciplinarity. It embraces a myriad of scientific disciplines—from established fields such as metallurgy and medicine, to ongoing research in nanotechnology and computer science—to develop countless products and technologies for a more comfortable and sustainable future. How ever we categorize it, discovering and engineering new materials to meet our modern challenges is crucial to our competitive technological global society.

How are ScienceOpen users working with materials science content on the platform? Researchers have started collections on silicon thin film solar cells, electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), photoluminescent nanomaterials, EU NanoSafety Cluster publications (journal articles), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We welcome more researcher-led collections in materials science so contact us today for editor status.

To bring together and increase the visibility of the latest materials research, ScienceOpen has joined efforts with Carl Hanser Verlag in a partnership that integrates all of Hanser’s journal content and highlights the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR) in the ScienceOpen discovery environment in the form of a featured collection. Continue reading “New research in materials science on ScienceOpen”  

ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science

Suzhou, China

See below for the Chinese language translation.

ScienceOpen and CompuScript/International Science Editing partnership in China

For the formal press release, see our Press RoomSTM Publishing News, and Knowledgespeak.

Chinese researchers face tremendous hurdles in communicating their research results to the rest of the world – from language barriers to internet restrictions and the traditional western bias of the scientific literature.

Confronted with the danger of being left out of the global scholarly communications, Chinese editors often publish in partnerships with publishers outside of China. This often leaves them having to give up control over the content to their global partners. However, to increase the discoverability of Chinese research in wider scientific circles, journals based in China now have new options to reach out to international audiences.

Over their 15-year history in China, CompuScript/International Science Editing—a leading European provider of publishing services to the scientific community headquartered in Ireland—have built a strong local network to help overcome these challenges, providing editorial and technical support to Chinese researchers, editors, and institutions. To support Chinese researchers and publishers and contribute to the mission of global open science, CompuScript/International Science Editing in China and ScienceOpen have partnered up to develop new products tailored specifically for the Chinese market and to utilize the full set of tools ScienceOpen offers for greater discoverability of Chinese research. Continue reading “ScienceOpen Supports Chinese Journals for Globally Inclusive Open Science”  

Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen

Image credit: Fotolia

You can now publish your preprint directly to ScienceOpen. The discovery platform ScienceOpen will put your work in context and open it up to review with a wide range of author-mediated peer review tools.

Preprints, first draft research manuscripts, have existed almost as long as the Internet. Scientists have been taking advantage of online communication to speed up research for almost 3 decades. ScienceOpen understands the importance of allowing researchers to openly share their results with the scientific community at an early stage in their research. The advantage for researchers is that they get early feedback from peers but can still publish the final version in most peer-reviewed journals of their choosing. To support researchers in fully utilizing the benefits of preprint publishing, ScienceOpen is pleased to launch open and free preprint publishing on our platform! With this beta service, anyone can now upload, publish, and promote their preprint using a free and simple interface with access to a full suite of tools for peer review, constructive discussion through comments, and usage and impact tracking.

We have supported the essential role of preprints in speeding up science from the beginning by integrating arXiv preprints on the platform. Records for over 27,000 bioRxiv preprints in our discovery environment followed suit, along with the capacity to add records from other preprint serves such as Preprints.org, PeerJ Preprints, ChemRxiv, and Open Science Framework repositories. Given our belief in the benefits of preprints in advancing science, it seemed only logical to develop a new feature that will enable all researchers to take advantage of preprints in scholarly research and communications. Continue reading “Publish your Preprint at ScienceOpen”  

Diverse Approaches to Peer Review

Portrait of Albert Einstein in a museum. Source: pixabay.com

Peer Review Week, Sep 10-15, 2018

Peer Review Week is a global event celebrating the role of peer review in maintaining scientific quality. This year marks the event’s fourth anniversary of bringing together researchers, institutions, and organizations committed to the message that good peer review is crucial to scholarly communications. This year Peer Review Week on the topic of diversity aims:

  • To emphasize the central role peer review plays in scholarly communication
  • To showcase the work of editors and reviewers
  • To share research and advance best practices
  • To highlight the latest innovation and applications.
    (Source: https://peerreviewweek.wordpress.com/)

Although peer review itself is not as young as the week-long event organized in its celebration, it is still a relatively new invention. Albert Einstein published his original papers in non-peer-reviewed German journals through 1933, most famously in the Annalen der Physik. Max Planck, one of the journal’s editors of the time, described his editorial philosophy as:

To shun much more the reproach of having suppressed strange opinions than that of having been too gentle in evaluating them.

After moving to the US, Einstein was so shocked that his paper submitted to the Physical Review in 1936 was met with negative criticism that he decided not to publish with them at all. Ironically, the paper in question hypothesized that gravitational waves do not exist. In retrospect, peer review saved Einstein the controversy and the embarrassment that would have ensued if he had published his original article. Continue reading “Diverse Approaches to Peer Review”  

Beyond the Journal: ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society Launch Collaboration on New Cross-Disciplinary Collections

For formal press release, see our Press RoomKnowledgespeak and Information Today, Inc.

 

ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society are pleased to announce a collaboration on new ways to showcase cross-disciplinary research. The ScienceOpen discovery environment provides state-of-the-art technological infrastructure to promote exciting new initiatives from the Society’s journals.

Interdisciplinarity is key for the Microbiology Society in reaching a wide range of researchers, from microbiologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, social scientists and policymakers to physicists, chemists and engineers. In line with their mission to advance the understanding and impact of microbiology by connecting communities worldwide, the Society is exploring new ways to package digital information, from pop-up journals to mini-review formats, to bring diverse researchers together to solve global problems.

ScienceOpen has created a flexible “Collection” product to highlight publisher content within the larger context of academic research – with over 43 million articles and records on the site. The Microbiology Society is taking advantage of the full scope of interactive features available to researchers on ScienceOpen. As well as promoting the Open Access journal Microbial Genomics, the Society is using ScienceOpen to promote cross-disciplinary products that draw on articles from multiple journals, such as the new pop-up journal on antimicrobial resistance X-AMR, the Microbiome collection created in conjunction with the British Society for Immunology, and the Microbe and Virus Profiles created in conjunction with top microbiologists and the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, both of which offer concise reviews for experts and beyond. Continue reading “Beyond the Journal: ScienceOpen and the Microbiology Society Launch Collaboration on New Cross-Disciplinary Collections”