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Category: Societies

ScienceOpen works with publishers to highlight Coronavirus research

ScienceOpen has released a Collection of COVID-19 research that highlights rigorous, peer-reviewed articles by reputable journals and publishers within the rapidly growing coronavirus knowledge base. Almost two dozen publishers have already participated in ScienceOpen’s initiative, bringing together 1000s of articles and enabling better discovery for the research community.

ScienceOpen offers powerful filters for enhanced discovery and interactive tools to recommend, review and share research. Publishers can create unique collection landing pages for their coronavirus-related content within the context of thousands of preprints and articles aggregated from around the world.  

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Publisher Collections of coronavirus research highlighted on ScienceOpen


File:Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.jpg - Wikipedia

The fast-paced research that we need to quickly understand the novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 and effectively find treatments has changed how scientists are communicating their results. Many researchers are posting their findings as preprints to speed up data sharing, rather than waiting for peer review and publication in an academic journal. But publishers are also stepping up and providing expedited processes to make peer reviewed information available as fast as possible, collecting all relevant publications together and making those freely accessible during this crisis.

Continue reading “Publisher Collections of coronavirus research highlighted on ScienceOpen”  

ScienceOpen features new Access Microbiology journal by the Microbiology Society

The Microbiology Society has launched a second journal portal on ScienceOpen. The recent release highlights the Society’s new Gold Open Access journal, Access Microbiology, which redefines the idea of ‘high impact’ research by emphasizing great value of methodologically sound and rigorous research for the broader scientific community.  

From early career researchers for early careeer researchers

Access Microbiology is an exciting journal for the Microbiology Society, built for and led by early career researchers and with the goal of ensuring that valuable research outputs are published, whether they are conference posters, negative results, or replication studies. We’ve been working with ScienceOpen for some time, initially for Microbial Genomics, and we know that making the work published in Access Microbiology more visible by showcasing it through ScienceOpen is a clear benefit to our authors. 

Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Director of Publishing at the Microbiology Society

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ScienceOpen and the IET launch two new collections in the fields of AI and Transport

ScienceOpen and the IET (The Institution of Engineering and Technology) are pleased to launch two featured collections: ‘ AI & Robotics’ and ‘Transport Engineering and Technology’ which integrate selected Open Access articles from IET’s peer-reviewed international journals in the ScienceOpen research discovery environment.

The new ScienceOpen Collections by the IET features recent scientific advances and increase their accessibility for the global audience with the overarching aim of informing next generations of engineers in the dynamically changing fields of artificial intelligence and of transport.

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Scholarly Societies and the Sustainable Development Goals on ScienceOpen

Ähnliches Foto

The unanimous adoption by UN Member States of the Sustainable Development Goals raised hopes that they would serve as a backbone for a global partnership for peace and prosperity. Yet, it is not only a political agenda: delivering the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals has become the focal point for many scientific communities across the globe.

Science, however, is a tremendously diverse practice with efforts always underway on multiple fronts simultaneously. As a result, it often proves difficult to find a unified platform where one could inform themselves in one place how different groups of scientists bring us closer toward accomplishing the sustainability goals.

The Microbiology Society, a leading organisation for research in microbes with over 10,000 publications indexed on ScienceOpen, decided to address this challenge and also highlight the vital role of learned societies in working together towards a sustainable future. The Society’s one-of-a-kind initiative culminated in the creation of the ScienceOpen Collection ‘A Sustainable Future’. This selection of research goes beyond the scope of microbiology and integrates contributions from nine scholarly organisations across topics such as ecology, medicine, social policy and welfare, environmental studies, and biochemistry. Offering this kind of unified learning experience is unprecedented, but this is not the only thing that makes this Collection unique!

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New Water Research from American Water Works Association

Plantschen, Spritzen, Aqua, Wasser, Gießen, Klar

ScienceOpen is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the American Water Works Association (AWWA) to showcase the new interdisciplinary journal, AWWA Water Science (AWS), which publishes original, peer-reviewed research on the science, engineering, and social aspects of water. Thanks to ScienceOpen’s unique infrastructure, authors who publish their research in AWS will have enhanced discoverability as well as access to a suite of features, such as community curation, article reviews, comments, and recommendations, all of which benefit the whole scientific community by facilitating public engagement with scholarly research.

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In:  Societies  

Quick update on AAAS letter

Just posting this quick update because the discussion about the AAAS letter, the response of their CEO, and subsequent coverage in Times Higher Education is moving rapidly this morning. With many different time zones involved, it can be tricky to keep up for the few of us who occasionally like to sleep! Here’s a round-up for those on the West Coast who are just waking up to this or anyone who is interested.

As some of you may know, last week 115 people from the the Research and Open Access (OA) community (including some from ScienceOpen and our Boards) sent this letter to the AAAS to protest the pricing level and structure for the new OA journal Science Advances.

Science Advances has a new Twitter stream which has but one tweet:

A couple of things to point out here, Possibly in an effort not to give the open letter more publicity, the AAAS don’t say in the tweet what they are responding to (no mention of open letter or link) and neither do they say in the response. A quick read of the AAAS CEO response (who is Alan Leshner, also not named!), shows it to be a classic PR piece that copiously links to previous corporate (but it’s a non-profit member led organization) AAAS statements about Science Advances, but nowhere to the letter!

Thankfully, the AAAS CEO response does now have a link to the open letter, published at The Winnower, via a comment from Ernesto Priego, a Lecturer in Library Science at the Dept of Library and Information Science, City University, London.

Paul Jump, science and research reporter for Times Higher Education to whom the AAAS response is addressed, has today written an article entitled “Shock and derision as Kent Anderson named Science publisher” which does mention and link to the letter and clears up the confusion. However, it is also worth noting that although the article headline is true, the open letter itself doesn’t make mention of Kent Anderson and focuses on pricing and licensing. 

The team behind the open letter (Erin McKiernan and Jon Tennant plus others) are strategizing their response and I will update this post as the days (probably minutes!) unfold.

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The story unfolds:

New 1: 8/28 – the follow up email to  was published as a comment on the original letter. 

New 2: 8/30 – took AAAS a few days to come up with this “response” to the letter, an achingly funny corporate FAQ which doesn’t mention the original or the follow up letter and fails to address any community concerns. Hmm. verdict = lame.

New 3: 9/1 – over the weekend, community get a bit fed up with not being heard by AAAS (a non-profit member organization that is meant to Advance Science). Some prominent news outlets interview Jon Tennant and Erin McKiernan.  First result, this excellent article by New Statesman.

New 4: 9/3 – Second result, excellent article by The Conversation.

In:  Societies  

Open Letter to the Society for Neuroscience

Dear Society for Neuroscience,

This is an open letter concerning the recent launch of the new open access journal, eNeuro.

We welcome the diversification of journal choices for authors looking for open access venues, as well as the willingness of eNeuro to accept negative results and study replications, its membership in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium, the publication of peer review syntheses alongside articles, and the requirement that molecular data be publicly available.

As strong supporters of open access, we welcome the commitment of the Society to making the works it publishes freely and openly available. However, we are concerned with several aspects of the specific approach, and outline herein a number of suggestions that would allow eNeuro to provide the full benefits of open access to the communities the journal aims to serve.  Continue reading “Open Letter to the Society for Neuroscience”  

In:  Societies  

Open letter to the AAAS

Image credit: justinc, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA
Image credit: justinc, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Dear AAAS,

This is an open letter concerning the recent launch of the new open access journal, Science Advances. In addition to the welcome diversification in journal choices for authors looking for open access venues, there are many positive aspects of Science Advances: its broad STEM scope, its interest in cross-disciplinary research, and the offering of fee waivers. While we welcome the commitment of the Association to open access, we are also deeply concerned with the specific approach. Herein, we outline a number of suggestions that are in line with both the current direction that scholarly publishing is taking and the needs expressed by the open access community, which this journal aims to serve. Continue reading “Open letter to the AAAS”