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Tag: Cell Biology

New Collection on Marine Science on ScienceOpen

Not so long ago have we celebrated the diversity of Chinese research that ScienceOpen opens up for the world to see. As a result, the pleasure to announce yet another Collection from a Chinese publisher is even greater. This time we are putting in the highlight an international peer-reviewed journal dedicated to new discoveries and theories associated with marine organisms, bioresources, and biotechnology: Marine Life Science and Technology. The journal is intended for marine scientists, biological oceanographers, conservation biologists, marine technologists, policy makers and legislators. It publishes original research papers across a broad range of marine life sciences and technologies with an emphasis on synergistic interactions of multiple disciplines.

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Gautam Dey, UCL’s Cell Biology rockstar: Publish your cake, and eat it.

Hi Gautam! Thanks for joining us here. Could you start off by letting us know a little bit about your background?

Hi Jon, thanks for having me here!

Credit: Gautam Dey

I’m a postdoc in Buzz Baum’s lab at UCL working on the evolution of cell division- all the way from Archaea to unicellular eukaryotes. I found myself in London in mid-2015 after a bit of continent-hopping that included a stint as a cell-biologist-in-training at the National Centre for Biological Sciences in Bangalore and a PhD in Systems Biology at Stanford University.

When did you first hear about open access and open science? What were your initial thoughts?

Back in 2005, when I was an undergraduate in India without proper library access. PLOS and PMC came to the rescue! At the time paywalls were a very real and practical hindrance, but I must confess I didn’t think much about the actual ethics of publishing until well into my PhD.

As a postdoc in the UK, how do you feel about recent policy changes around Open Access?

I think the UK is making some positive moves, such as requiring Open Access for compliance with the Research Evaluation Framework. Funding agencies like the BBSRC and Wellcome Trust defray the costs of “gold” Open Access for published research supported by their grants. However, in the absence of accompanying reforms in the publishing industry or revised evaluation criteria for scientists, many of these policy changes will simply funnel more taxpayer money towards established scientific journals, providing more of a stopgap than a long-term solution.

I must confess I didn’t think much about the actual ethics of publishing until well into my PhD

Continue reading “Gautam Dey, UCL’s Cell Biology rockstar: Publish your cake, and eat it.”