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Tag: Genomics

Society publishing and open science: New research in genomic prediction on ScienceOpen

Photo credit: ‘Genomics of Gene Regulation (GGR)’, National Human Genome Research Institute, Flickr, CC BY 2.0

Society journal in a box

According to a recently published LSE Impact Blog article, society publishing might just be the key to realizing an open access future. Committed to open science practices, ScienceOpen has been supporting scholarly society journals since its foundation in 2013 and continues to do so by integrating society research on the platform in the form of featured Collections.

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New open access research in genetics on ScienceOpen

Photo source: Figure 3 (p. 515) from “Exploring a Nonmodel Teleost Genome Through RAD Sequencing—Linkage Mapping in Common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and Comparative Genomic Analysis”, G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics, vol. 6, March 2016, Open Access

To support open access scientific publishing and increase the discoverability of genetics and genomics research, ScienceOpen has partnered with the Genetics Society of America (GSA) to integrate the open access journal G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics into the ScienceOpen discovery environment in the form of a featured collection.

How are researchers working with genetics content on ScienceOpen? Our users have curated collections on topics such as higher order chromatin architecture, CRISPR/Cas9 editing in human blood, genome engineering using CRISPR, and the measurement of glucocorticoid receptor signaling in major depression. We always welcome more researcher-led collections in genetics on ScienceOpen so contact us today for editor status!

GSA’s open access journal G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics provides a forum for the publication of high-quality genetics and genomics research such as genome maps, single gene studies, genome‐wide association and QTL studies, as well as genome reports,  mutant screens, and advances in methods and technology. Furthermore, G3 has published thematic collections on Genomic PredictionMultiparental PopulationsGenetics of Immunity, and Genetics of Sex. As a featured collection on ScienceOpen, this journal is placed in a digital research environment of interactive tools that increases the discoverability of its findings.

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In:  Research  

Next level genomics at ScienceOpen

We’ve had some amazing new publications recently here at ScienceOpen, and with many more in the pipeline too! For us, every paper we publish is special, and we like to highlight the effort put into them by our authors as much as possible. One of our newest addition is from the field of molecular biology and genomics, a huge and rapidly advancing research domain.

The title of the work is “About the variability, quality and reproducibility of ChIP-seq data“, and is open access of course so everyone and anyone has the opportunity to read it. The new study comes from Hinrich Gronemeyer, a well-respected researcher and Research Director at the Institute of Genetics, Cellular & Molecular Biology (IGBMC) in Strasbourg-Illkirch, and his team.

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Data sharing is crucial for genomics research!

Our ongoing ‘Open Science Stars’ series has highlighted some of the vast variety of views, experiences, and facets of open science, and a cadre of great people working to drive real and positive change. This week, we spoke with Fiona Nielsen, who has founded two companies dedicated to the sharing of genomics data! Here’s her amazing story.

Hi Fiona! Thanks for joining us at the ScienceOpen blog. Could you start off by letting us know a bit about your background?

Pleased to join your blog series. 🙂

I am a bioinformatics researcher with a background in computer science. My first degree was a short computer science degree, which I then expanded by studying bioinformatics at the University of Southern Denmark, where I gradually moved more and more into genetics and DNA sequence analysis. After my masters I moved to Nijmegen, the Netherlands where I studied for a PhD in bioinformatics at the NCMLS. During my time as a PhD student, my mother was diagnosed with cancer, and I lost my motivation to work on scientific topics far removed from patient impact. I moved to Cambridge, UK to work for Illumina, and after two years I decided to leave my 9-5 job to start my own project: I founded first the charity DNAdigest and later the company Repositive to enable better data sharing within genomics research.

Cute! Had to share this from the Repositive site (https://repositive.io/)
Cute! Had to share this from the Repositive site (https://repositive.io/)

 

When did you first become interested in Open Access and Open Science? What was your initial reaction when you heard about it?

I do not recall when I first came across the terms of Open Access and Open Science, but I do recall that I repeatedly came across anecdotes from colleagues that could not access data or results from published papers, and how I looked up to the progressive researchers who would “go all the way” and make all data and results available immediately, even before publication of a paper.

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