Tag: Google Scholar

ScienceOpen: Publisher Services for the Digital Age


Image by Matthias Wewering from Pixabay 

The Challenge: Academic publishing is transitioning to a fully digital industry which means publishers need access to state-of-the-art technology to keep up with ever-changing best practices. It faces the pressures and challenges of establishing new business models, products, and reputation structures. The cost of innovating is especially high for smaller participants.

The Solution: Discovery is key in the digital space. ScienceOpen offers unique technologies for academic publishers to create, host, and promote their content, whether it be journals, books, conferences, or preprints. Our services also include integrating your content within a freely accessible discovery environment with next-generation metrics and curation tools for reputation management and dissemination. Working closely with all types of scholarly publishers from across the world, ScienceOpen works on an individual base to develop solutions for publisher’s content.


ScienceOpen has a wide range of packages and customizable services, and we are constantly evolving to meet the needs of the future. We have put together below an overview of our services to give an updated account of what we can offer publishers. Contact us to find out even more because we have projects in the pipeline and can often build a new solution to fit the needs of your program.

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ScienceOpen: The Publisher Partner for Best-Practice Metadata

Metadata Services at ScienceOpen 

Image by Manfred Steger from Pixabay

For many publishers the requirements of modern digital publishing can be dizzying – XML DTDs, PIDs, DOIs, metatags. At ScienceOpen we have been consulting publishers on their metadata for years to help get the most visibility possible for academic publications. We have increasingly built systems with our technical partner, Ovitas, to support publishers with metadata creation and distribution and made each new tool available to the next customer.  As a metadata technical hub, we can automate time-consuming tasks and let publishers concentrate on the content. Here are a few of the services that we can provide to help take the pain out of publishing: 

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Moving beyond a journal-based filtering system

The amount of published scientific research is simply enormous. Current estimates are over 70 million individual research articles, with around 2 million more being published every year. We are in the midst of an information revolution, with the World Wide Web offering rapid, structured and practical distribution of knowledge. But for researchers, this creates the monolith task of manually finding relevant content to fuel their work, and begs the question, are we doing the best we can to leverage this knowledge?

There are already several well-established searchable archives, scientific databases representing warehouses for all of our knowledge and data. The most well-known include the Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, and Google Scholar, which together are the de facto mode for current methods of information retrieval. The first two of these are paid services, and attempts to replicate searches between all platforms produce inconsistent results (e.g., Bakkalbasi et al., Kulkarni et al.), raising questions about each of their methods of procurement. The search algorithms for each are also fairly opaque, and the relative reliability of each is quite uncertain. Each of them, though, have their own benefits and pitfalls, which are far better discussed elsewhere (e.g. Falagas et al.).

So where does this leave discoverability for researchers in a world that is becoming more and more ‘open’?

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