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UCL COVID-19 Collection—An interactive showcase of COVID-19 related research from the University College London

UCL COVID-19 Collection benefits authors, publishers, and users

The global pandemic has elicited a resounding response from the academic community in terms of research regarding the novel coronavirus disease. From the onset, ScienceOpen has been working with publishers and researchers to create COVID-19 resources that help organize the massive amount of research being published.  

Our most recent COVID-19 Collection has been created with the University College London library where we have made a collection indexing all UCL research related to the COVID-19 pandemic. This collection is automatically updated by pulling in records from the institutional repository UCL Discovery and affiliation metadata from records aggregated by the ScienceOpen platform. The automated setup easily manages the stream of new COVID-19 material being published and opens it up for exploration and interaction. In just the last week, there were 35 new publications added to the collection. Additional benefits of having all of the UCL published research relating to COVID-19 in one place is that it gives users easy and flexible tools for search and discovery such as changing the sort order from number of citations, AltmetricTM score or date. Users searching the contents of the collection, can narrow the number of articles in the collection by specific journals, publishers, or overlapping collections on the ScienceOpen platform. Thus, a user would be able to see publications that also appear in the Wiley: Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 and or in the UCL Press special issue Special series on COVID-19 interactions with our Environment collections.  This encourages users to browse the content and supports easy discovery of related research. Follow the UCL COVID-19 Collection for updates on new content or interactions! 

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A Workflow for Open Peer Review: Case Study UCL Press

Peer review is a key element of scholarly publishing, but for the past decade the research community has struggled to move beyond the black box and develop new open models of research evaluation. University College London and UCL Press would like to change that. Since the beginning, ScienceOpen has been committed to open peer review – now offering post-publication review options for over 62 million articles and preprints. So, with the vision of a university-led publishing platform based on open review principles, UCL Press teamed up with ScienceOpen to create the journal “UCL Open: Environment”.

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The Force – Meet the Technical Side of ScienceOpen

ScienceOpen has been promoting Open Science from the beginning. For years we helped advancing this goal by supporting researchers and publishers to make science more visible, accessible, and reproducible. With this we aim to meet the global call(s) for openness and offer solutions that can benefit all.

The technical backbone

The ScienceOpen platform provides a unique advanced indexing, hosting, and publishing environment that is freely accessible and embedded within an interactive discovery and communication infrastructure of more than 60 million publication records—including journal articles, conference papers, open peer reviews, preprints—and offers free poster and preprint publication (incl. versioning) for researchers.

Last year, we launched within our framework the UCL Open publishing platform for the UCL Open: Environment multi-disciplinary journal. In close collaboration with our partner UCL Press, an alternative space for new modes of scientific content community curation was created.

The platform received a new infrastructural branch to include books and book chapters, an essential advancement that offers an additional channel for our researchers, customers, and users to promote and discover relevant content and to expand their portfolio or profile.

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Open Science Resources on ScienceOpen

Photo credit: ‘Unlock’, Thomas Ulrich, Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

ScienceOpen has been committed to making science open from its onset. Some of our latest projects in realizing this commitment have been launching the ‘UCL Open: Environment‘ megajournal, contextualizing the new open access journal ‘BMJ Open Science’ into the ScienceOpen research discovery environment of 53 million article records, and offering some ideas on how you can contribute to open science in small but significant ways.

In light of the 6th Open Science Conference organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science in Berlin this week, we decided to give you an overview of some of the most relevant and diverse research content on open science curated in the form of researcher-led collections on ScienceOpen. Our research recommendations below discuss some of the most pertinent issues in open science, such as the FAIR data principles, reproducible research, metadata, and open access scholarship. Enjoy!

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I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers often pay substantial sums to make the results of their research freely accessible to all. But how to let potential readers know that it’s FREE?  If no one reads your open access paper, it’s like buying someone a gift certificate that they never use. So, the community has agreed on this solution: 

The open access symbol signals to readers that they can expect direct and unrestricted access to published scholarly works. Originally created by PLOS, it quickly gained broad usage on publisher webpages and other sites to identify open access articles. ScienceOpen displays this open access symbol on over 4 million articles.

So how does the open access symbol get there? When a publisher publishes an article, they deposit the article “metadata” – title, authors, abstract, journal, date, URL, etc. with the central DOI service Crossref. Part of the information that they can deposit is a machine-readable Creative Commons open access license. When ScienceOpen imports the metadata information about your publication, it will get an open access symbol if our computers find an open access license associated with it. If a publisher does not deposit license information, we assume that it is not open access. It’s that simple. Continue reading “I paid $$$ – Where is my open access symbol?”